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Found 70 results

  1. With the recent release of Dishonored 2, let's take a look at Arkane's first outing to the city-state of Dunwall. As the body-guard turned supernatural assassin, Corvo, players navigate the political turmoil left by an assassinated empress to save her daughter. The 2012 release of Dishonored was met with an overwhelmingly positive reception, but has it aged well since then? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Final Fantasy IX 'Não Está Sozinho' by Tomo Club (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03441) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  2. With the recent release of Dishonored 2, let's take a look at Arkane's first outing to the city-state of Dunwall. As the body-guard turned supernatural assassin, Corvo, players navigate the political turmoil left by an assassinated empress to save her daughter. The 2012 release of Dishonored was met with an overwhelmingly positive reception, but has it aged well since then? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Final Fantasy IX 'Não Está Sozinho' by Tomo Club (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03441) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  3. The company behind the critically acclaimed Skyrim and Fallout 4 announced a major shift in their stance on reviews yesterday. In a blog post titled "Bethesda & Game Reviews," the video game company explained that it would not be sending out review copies except for one day prior to release. "While we will continue to work with media, streamers, and YouTubers to support their coverage – both before and after release – we want everyone, including those in the media, to experience our games at the same time," read the official reasoning for the change. Bethesda tested the waters with this practice with the release of Doom earlier this year. They sent out review copies one day prior to launch, which led many media outlets and professionals to question whether Doom would be a disaster. A company not sending out early review copies typically shows a lack of faith in the product. Companies who doubt how well their game will be received historically try to maximize profit by sending late review copies in order to rake in as many sales as possible before the game gets panned by critics. However, Doom wasn't a colossal flop, garnering critical and commercial success. Because of that success, Bethesda is pointing to Doom as a model for future game releases. The company wants to draw a parallel between Doom and all of its future releases. Obviously that only works if all future game releases are guaranteed to be of the same quality as Doom - a guarantee that's impossible to give. People often talk about Bethesda in a general sense when it is actually composed of two different companies: Bethesda Softworks and Bethesda Game Studios. Softworks operates as the publishing arm while Game Studios develops their in-house titles. This decision regarding review copies affects both parts of Bethesda. While many people might have faith in future installments of The Elder Scrolls or Fallout, what about the games Bethesda publishes? What about the future games they publish that take after Rogue Warrior or Brink? "At Bethesda, we value media reviews. We read them. We watch them. We try to learn from them when they offer critique. And we understand their value to our players," read the opening lines of Bethesda's announcement. What should people who want to make informed game purchases do? Luckily Bethesda has an answer, "We also understand that some of you want to read reviews before you make your decision, and if that’s the case we encourage you to wait for your favorite reviewers to share their thoughts." To paraphrase: Bethesda understands the value of reviews and the effect they can have on our sales. If you value reviews, just wait. Wait for them until after we've made money off the people who didn't wait and bought on release day. It's time to be blunt. Bethesda can't predict the future. It can no more guarantee that its future games will be universally amazing than it can guarantee that you will live forever. Bethesda also doesn't care if everyone experiences their games at the same time, despite their official line on the matter. Bethesda is a company, not an altruistic patron of the arts and certainly not your friend. Bethesda exists to make money, and if it can do that more effectively by blocking potential bad press until a few days after release, it will. They got away with this anti-consumer behavior with Doom and now they will be trying to get away with it again for the release of Skyrim Special Edition and Dishonored 2. To clarify: We have never received early review copies from Bethesda. This piece doesn't come from a place of spite. While the decision to only send out review copies one day prior to release turns reviewing a game on the scale of Skyrim into a grueling race for many media outlets, that's not a problem for our reviews. The real disservice here isn't to media, it is to Bethesda's customers - to you. If you want to show Bethesda that their tactics to keep you uninformed until after you buy their games won't work - take their advice: Wait. Don't pre-order. Don't buy on release day. Don't make your purchase before reviews come out and you can make a decision while armed with information. If enough people do that, Bethesda will be forced to adjust their practices accordingly.
  4. The company behind the critically acclaimed Skyrim and Fallout 4 announced a major shift in their stance on reviews yesterday. In a blog post titled "Bethesda & Game Reviews," the video game company explained that it would not be sending out review copies except for one day prior to release. "While we will continue to work with media, streamers, and YouTubers to support their coverage – both before and after release – we want everyone, including those in the media, to experience our games at the same time," read the official reasoning for the change. Bethesda tested the waters with this practice with the release of Doom earlier this year. They sent out review copies one day prior to launch, which led many media outlets and professionals to question whether Doom would be a disaster. A company not sending out early review copies typically shows a lack of faith in the product. Companies who doubt how well their game will be received historically try to maximize profit by sending late review copies in order to rake in as many sales as possible before the game gets panned by critics. However, Doom wasn't a colossal flop, garnering critical and commercial success. Because of that success, Bethesda is pointing to Doom as a model for future game releases. The company wants to draw a parallel between Doom and all of its future releases. Obviously that only works if all future game releases are guaranteed to be of the same quality as Doom - a guarantee that's impossible to give. People often talk about Bethesda in a general sense when it is actually composed of two different companies: Bethesda Softworks and Bethesda Game Studios. Softworks operates as the publishing arm while Game Studios develops their in-house titles. This decision regarding review copies affects both parts of Bethesda. While many people might have faith in future installments of The Elder Scrolls or Fallout, what about the games Bethesda publishes? What about the future games they publish that take after Rogue Warrior or Brink? "At Bethesda, we value media reviews. We read them. We watch them. We try to learn from them when they offer critique. And we understand their value to our players," read the opening lines of Bethesda's announcement. What should people who want to make informed game purchases do? Luckily Bethesda has an answer, "We also understand that some of you want to read reviews before you make your decision, and if that’s the case we encourage you to wait for your favorite reviewers to share their thoughts." To paraphrase: Bethesda understands the value of reviews and the effect they can have on our sales. If you value reviews, just wait. Wait for them until after we've made money off the people who didn't wait and bought on release day. It's time to be blunt. Bethesda can't predict the future. It can no more guarantee that its future games will be universally amazing than it can guarantee that you will live forever. Bethesda also doesn't care if everyone experiences their games at the same time, despite their official line on the matter. Bethesda is a company, not an altruistic patron of the arts and certainly not your friend. Bethesda exists to make money, and if it can do that more effectively by blocking potential bad press until a few days after release, it will. They got away with this anti-consumer behavior with Doom and now they will be trying to get away with it again for the release of Skyrim Special Edition and Dishonored 2. To clarify: We have never received early review copies from Bethesda. This piece doesn't come from a place of spite. While the decision to only send out review copies one day prior to release turns reviewing a game on the scale of Skyrim into a grueling race for many media outlets, that's not a problem for our reviews. The real disservice here isn't to media, it is to Bethesda's customers - to you. If you want to show Bethesda that their tactics to keep you uninformed until after you buy their games won't work - take their advice: Wait. Don't pre-order. Don't buy on release day. Don't make your purchase before reviews come out and you can make a decision while armed with information. If enough people do that, Bethesda will be forced to adjust their practices accordingly. View full article
  5. Usually, each week we tackle a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. This week, we make an exception and break from convention to talk about the best and worst games shown at E3 this year. Jeremy and Daniel talk about the various reveals shown at the E3 press conferences and what each of the major developers and publishers are bringing to the biggest gaming show of the year. They also touch on issues related to VR that appeared on the show floor, Father's Day, and generally digest all the E3 news with some friendly banter. This episode strays into some NSFW territory, so heads up on that fact. Outro music: Super Mario 64 'Ripples of Hope' by Chimpazilla and Emunator (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03366) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monda View full article
  6. Usually, each week we tackle a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. This week, we make an exception and break from convention to talk about the best and worst games shown at E3 this year. Jeremy and Daniel talk about the various reveals shown at the E3 press conferences and what each of the major developers and publishers are bringing to the biggest gaming show of the year. They also touch on issues related to VR that appeared on the show floor, Father's Day, and generally digest all the E3 news with some friendly banter. This episode strays into some NSFW territory, so heads up on that fact. Outro music: Super Mario 64 'Ripples of Hope' by Chimpazilla and Emunator (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03366) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monda
  7. ...But it wont be out for a LOOOONG time. Todd Howard interview ...dang.
  8. Many wondered what Bethesda would show at their pre-E3 conference this year. Would they show a Skyrim remaster? Prey 2? Evil Within 2? Bethesda threw a mixed bag at its audience this year with some predictions coming to pass, some only slightly happening, and others not appearing at all in their announcement line-up. The pre-E3 Bethesda press conference began with a bang that many weren't expecting so close on the heels of Doom's release. A new entry in the Quake series, Quake Champions burst into glorious existence in a hail of gunfire. The team at id Software supposedly have the title running at an impressive 120hz with an unlocked framerate and the cinematic trailer that heralded Quake's revival looked fantastic. The multiplayer arena shooter boasts new characters with unique abilities, each one catering to a different playstyle. Several of Quake's champions show their signature moves in the reveal trailer. The conference then moved through a brief retrospective of what had happened over the past year. The surprise success of Fallout Shelter, The Elder Scrolls Online hanging on and managing to survive, the release of Fallout 4 and Doom were all touched upon. Bethesda then described The Elder Scrolls Legnds, a card game that delves into the lore of The Elder Scrolls universe. Told by a Moth Priest named Kellen, Legends follows the legend of Elder Scrolls lore and pairs that with a strategic card game. The intro cinematic was shown and allowed to speak for itself as to what Legends will be about. Players can join the beta of Legends on the Bethesda website. Moving on to Fallout things, three new expansions to Fallout 4 were briefly teased during the Bethesda showcase. The first, Contraptions Workshop, will allow players to build all kinds of new things in their settlements like elevators, conveyor belts, racks for weapons and armor, ball tracks, and more! Contraptions becomes available on June 14. The second Fallout 4 expansion shown, called Vault-Tec Workshop, grants players the ability to build their own Vaults. Of course, it appear that building a new Vault comes with its own unique challenges, like angry underground monsters, raiders, and more. Once the Vault attracts some residents, players can start conducting experiments on the new inhabitants. The final DLC was revealed with a short camera pan up from the Wasteland to an abandoned Nuka-Cola-themed park. Appropriately enough, this expansion is titled Nuka World and takes place in a long abandoned theme park. No release dates were given for Vault-Tec Workshop or Nuka World. Rounding out the Fallout news, Fallout Shelter's 1.6 update overhauls combat, adds questing, new items, characters, and locations. The addition of questing has apparently bolstered Bethesda's confidence in the mobile title enough to bring it to PC. The update and PC version will be releasing sometime next month. And yes, Bethesda is working on a Skyrim remaster. Titled Skyrim Special Addition brings massively overhauled graphics to the world of Skyrim for Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC, along with full PC mod support for the consoles. Since the announcement of its existence, Bethesda tweeted that those who own Skyrim and all its add-ons or own the Steam Legendary Edition will receive a free upgrade to Skyrim Special Edition. Skyrim Special Edition releases on October 28. Perhaps the most surprising moment of the night was the reveal of Prey, Arkane Studio's reimagining/reboot of the 2006 Prey. Instead of highlighting spiritual aspects of Native American culture as gameplay mechanics and story beats, the new Prey puts a psychological twist on everything. Forsaking former protagonist Domasi "Tommy" Tawodi, Prey centers on the tormented struggle of Morgan Yu as he awakens on the Talos 1 space station. With a mysterious alien force in pursuit and a growing sense of urgency, Morgan will need to harness his mind-bending abilities to uncover the secrets of the station and get through his ordeal alive. While certainly not the Prey 2 that was once teased in years long past or even the remnants of that amazing "what could have been" game, Prey looks like an interesting project to keep an eye on. Arkane states that Prey will release in 2017 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. A multitude of free new updates are on the way for Doom's SnapMap, allowing players to create new single-player experiences to share online with new props, logic options, and visual themes. New multiplayer content is on the way as well, with new game modes like Exodus, Sector, and three free-for-all modes. Next month a premium DLC pack will release. Called Unto the Evil, it will focus on multiplayer with three new maps, a new demon, a new gun, and more. Perhaps the coolest part of the Doom announcements was the nod to Doom's roots as a shareware title. Following the Bethesda conference, anyone who does not own a copy of Doom can play the first level of the title on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC for free. Bethesda followed up the Doom portion of the presentation to talk about The Elder Scrolls Online. A Japanese release of the MMO is on the way, opening up the community of seven million players to Eastern markets. The majority of the ESO talk focused on the release of the The Dark Brotherhood DLC for PC/Mac today and Xbox One/PlayStation 4 on June 14. Bethesda then announced their Bethesda VR initiative which allows players to take a virtual tour of Hell in the world of Doom and play Fallout 4, wandering the Wasteland in full VR. Fallout 4 VR will be possible with Vive support later this fall. The crowning part of the evening was an in-depth look at the gameplay of Dishonored 2 through the eyes of new protagonist Emily Kaldwin. New powers, expanded verticality, and powerful gadgets await players who wish to dive into all that stealth has to offer. Honestly, it looks very slick, so just watch the gameplay. Dishonored 2 releases on November 11 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. That wraps up pretty much everything that Bethesda touched on during their press conference. You can watch the full broadcast on Bethesda's YouTube channel. For more E3 press conference news, check out our coverage of EA's press event! View full article
  9. Many wondered what Bethesda would show at their pre-E3 conference this year. Would they show a Skyrim remaster? Prey 2? Evil Within 2? Bethesda threw a mixed bag at its audience this year with some predictions coming to pass, some only slightly happening, and others not appearing at all in their announcement line-up. The pre-E3 Bethesda press conference began with a bang that many weren't expecting so close on the heels of Doom's release. A new entry in the Quake series, Quake Champions burst into glorious existence in a hail of gunfire. The team at id Software supposedly have the title running at an impressive 120hz with an unlocked framerate and the cinematic trailer that heralded Quake's revival looked fantastic. The multiplayer arena shooter boasts new characters with unique abilities, each one catering to a different playstyle. Several of Quake's champions show their signature moves in the reveal trailer. The conference then moved through a brief retrospective of what had happened over the past year. The surprise success of Fallout Shelter, The Elder Scrolls Online hanging on and managing to survive, the release of Fallout 4 and Doom were all touched upon. Bethesda then described The Elder Scrolls Legnds, a card game that delves into the lore of The Elder Scrolls universe. Told by a Moth Priest named Kellen, Legends follows the legend of Elder Scrolls lore and pairs that with a strategic card game. The intro cinematic was shown and allowed to speak for itself as to what Legends will be about. Players can join the beta of Legends on the Bethesda website. Moving on to Fallout things, three new expansions to Fallout 4 were briefly teased during the Bethesda showcase. The first, Contraptions Workshop, will allow players to build all kinds of new things in their settlements like elevators, conveyor belts, racks for weapons and armor, ball tracks, and more! Contraptions becomes available on June 14. The second Fallout 4 expansion shown, called Vault-Tec Workshop, grants players the ability to build their own Vaults. Of course, it appear that building a new Vault comes with its own unique challenges, like angry underground monsters, raiders, and more. Once the Vault attracts some residents, players can start conducting experiments on the new inhabitants. The final DLC was revealed with a short camera pan up from the Wasteland to an abandoned Nuka-Cola-themed park. Appropriately enough, this expansion is titled Nuka World and takes place in a long abandoned theme park. No release dates were given for Vault-Tec Workshop or Nuka World. Rounding out the Fallout news, Fallout Shelter's 1.6 update overhauls combat, adds questing, new items, characters, and locations. The addition of questing has apparently bolstered Bethesda's confidence in the mobile title enough to bring it to PC. The update and PC version will be releasing sometime next month. And yes, Bethesda is working on a Skyrim remaster. Titled Skyrim Special Addition brings massively overhauled graphics to the world of Skyrim for Xbox One, PlayStation 4 and PC, along with full PC mod support for the consoles. Since the announcement of its existence, Bethesda tweeted that those who own Skyrim and all its add-ons or own the Steam Legendary Edition will receive a free upgrade to Skyrim Special Edition. Skyrim Special Edition releases on October 28. Perhaps the most surprising moment of the night was the reveal of Prey, Arkane Studio's reimagining/reboot of the 2006 Prey. Instead of highlighting spiritual aspects of Native American culture as gameplay mechanics and story beats, the new Prey puts a psychological twist on everything. Forsaking former protagonist Domasi "Tommy" Tawodi, Prey centers on the tormented struggle of Morgan Yu as he awakens on the Talos 1 space station. With a mysterious alien force in pursuit and a growing sense of urgency, Morgan will need to harness his mind-bending abilities to uncover the secrets of the station and get through his ordeal alive. While certainly not the Prey 2 that was once teased in years long past or even the remnants of that amazing "what could have been" game, Prey looks like an interesting project to keep an eye on. Arkane states that Prey will release in 2017 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. A multitude of free new updates are on the way for Doom's SnapMap, allowing players to create new single-player experiences to share online with new props, logic options, and visual themes. New multiplayer content is on the way as well, with new game modes like Exodus, Sector, and three free-for-all modes. Next month a premium DLC pack will release. Called Unto the Evil, it will focus on multiplayer with three new maps, a new demon, a new gun, and more. Perhaps the coolest part of the Doom announcements was the nod to Doom's roots as a shareware title. Following the Bethesda conference, anyone who does not own a copy of Doom can play the first level of the title on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC for free. Bethesda followed up the Doom portion of the presentation to talk about The Elder Scrolls Online. A Japanese release of the MMO is on the way, opening up the community of seven million players to Eastern markets. The majority of the ESO talk focused on the release of the The Dark Brotherhood DLC for PC/Mac today and Xbox One/PlayStation 4 on June 14. Bethesda then announced their Bethesda VR initiative which allows players to take a virtual tour of Hell in the world of Doom and play Fallout 4, wandering the Wasteland in full VR. Fallout 4 VR will be possible with Vive support later this fall. The crowning part of the evening was an in-depth look at the gameplay of Dishonored 2 through the eyes of new protagonist Emily Kaldwin. New powers, expanded verticality, and powerful gadgets await players who wish to dive into all that stealth has to offer. Honestly, it looks very slick, so just watch the gameplay. Dishonored 2 releases on November 11 for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC. That wraps up pretty much everything that Bethesda touched on during their press conference. You can watch the full broadcast on Bethesda's YouTube channel. For more E3 press conference news, check out our coverage of EA's press event!
  10. This week voice actress, cosplayer, and Australian wrestling commissioner, Elizabeth DeLoria, joins us to take a hard look at Fallout 3. Released on PC, Xbox 360, and PlayStation 3, Fallout 3 was hailed as an incredible milestone for the video game industry. It was one of the most expansive and lovingly rendered open-worlds of the time. Despite a myriad of glitches, Bethesda's 2008 open-world RPG managed to establish an iconic look and feel that many have used as a benchmark for RPGs in the years since. Does the Capital Wasteland's world, story, and soundtrack hold up eight years later? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod You can find the talented Elizabeth DeLoria on Twitter as well: @elizabethdanger Outro music: Fallout 3 'The Fallout of Eli' by Brynner Agassi and Mazedude (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02077) New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  11. This week voice actress, cosplayer, and Australian wrestling commissioner, Elizabeth DeLoria, joins us to take a hard look at Fallout 3. Released on PC, Xbox 360, and PlayStation 3, Fallout 3 was hailed as an incredible milestone for the video game industry. It was one of the most expansive and lovingly rendered open-worlds of the time. Despite a myriad of glitches, Bethesda's 2008 open-world RPG managed to establish an iconic look and feel that many have used as a benchmark for RPGs in the years since. Does the Capital Wasteland's world, story, and soundtrack hold up eight years later? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod You can find the talented Elizabeth DeLoria on Twitter as well: @elizabethdanger Outro music: Fallout 3 'The Fallout of Eli' by Brynner Agassi and Mazedude (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02077) New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  12. The live-action trailer for Bethesda's Doom has landed and it is looking pretty snazzy in its full metal jacket. Directed by Joe Kosinski, best known for helming Tron: Legacy and Oblivion, the trailer plays almost like a minute long montage of moments as a long space marine makes his way through the demon-infested corridors of a space base. As the marine wades through the demonic forces, the song "New Noise" by Refused plays, adding additional metal flair to a pretty great minute-long video. Bethesda said that the trailer was made to represent the three pillars of Doom: Action, demons, and guns. Doom releases this coming May on the 13th, which happens to be a Friday, for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  13. The live-action trailer for Bethesda's Doom has landed and it is looking pretty snazzy in its full metal jacket. Directed by Joe Kosinski, best known for helming Tron: Legacy and Oblivion, the trailer plays almost like a minute long montage of moments as a long space marine makes his way through the demon-infested corridors of a space base. As the marine wades through the demonic forces, the song "New Noise" by Refused plays, adding additional metal flair to a pretty great minute-long video. Bethesda said that the trailer was made to represent the three pillars of Doom: Action, demons, and guns. Doom releases this coming May on the 13th, which happens to be a Friday, for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  14. Have you ever been playing one of the previous Doom titles and wondered what it would be like to control the monstrosities that you encounter? Bethesda will finally give players the opportunity to live that daydream in multiplayer combat against other human adversaries. They have released a trailer showing off four of the playable demons along with a small selection of power-ups and power weapons that players can use to level the playing field. Chainsaw in the back? Check. BFG? Double check. Players will also be able to turn invisible and quadruple their damage with power-ups. Doom appears to be well on the way to being a bloody good time, emphasis on the bloody. The trailer features several decapitations, jaw ripping, copious amounts of blood, and more. In terms of cathartic violence, it looks fantastic. However, it probably isn't the best game for children, which should shock absolutely no one familiar with the franchise. Doom releases on May 13 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  15. There are tears in my eyes. As I step carefully through the dead halls of a long-opened vault, the haunting voice of Skeeter Davis serenades the end of the world. Skeletons of drug addicts, dead for centuries, lay around in their final poses, boney arms still grasping for their next fix. I know what happened here, about the experiments and the desperate, doomed struggle these people faced while imprisoned with the very things they sought to escape on the surface. And as I explore the remnants of their homes, I see the small stories that made up their lives. Two people, probably alcoholics, lay on the floor in front of a liquor cabinet. Another locked themselves in the bathroom and overdosed on psycho. One of the last rooms contains a small, scattered pile of supplies and a PC that holds the final journal entries for an inhabitant that tried to stay clean, but eventually gave in to the temptation and died with his friends. I see all these small tragedies play out as I explore the vault and I can feel my heart constrict in my chest as Davis sings of loss. “Why does my heart go on beating? Why do these eyes of mine cry? Don’t they know it’s the end of the world?” croons Skeeter Davis as I take in the stories. It all comes rushing in: The destruction of the old world; the callous cruelty with which the end was prepared; and all the rage, sorrow, and despair my character must feel after the incredible losses she has endured. It’s all brought to a sharp, poignant moment of empathy through Fallout 4’s brilliant storytelling and characterization. Many people think of story as something that is delivered through dialogue and text. However, games also tell many little stories through environment design. While Bethesda has a long tradition of skillfully telling stories through their environments, Fallout 4 has some of the best instances of this. There are hundreds of small stories waiting in the wasteland. Some require some detective-like snooping to uncover and others don’t even have markers on the map, but observant players will find these glimpses into pre-fallout life scattered everywhere. The stories themselves aren’t always the most interesting, but the sheer number of them give weight to the Boston area. This was a place that once teemed with human life and could again one day, if the factions at work in the Commonwealth could be left to their own devices. Unfortunately, the different factions of the Commonwealth can’t seem to leave one another alone and that tension ties in with the profound disaster that takes place in the opening minutes of Fallout 4. The journey to resolve the initial conflict that begins the protagonist’s journey serves as the crux of some of the game’s most interesting ethical dilemmas (that consequently have sweeping ramifications for the wider game). Those hard choices are kept grounded in a personal reality by the relationships that players build with their companions, NPCs who serve as actual characters with opinions on how the protagonist interacts with the world and its inhabitants. This improves dramatically on the follower system that has appeared in previous Bethesda titles, by endowing these friendly NPCs with real character bonds become stronger and decisions farther down the line become more difficult. You will remember the likes of Piper, Nick Valentine, and Curie long after your time with Fallout 4 comes to an end. Fallout 4 impresses me with the many improvements that take the elements established in Fallout 3 and brings them to the next level. The most easily seen improvement appears in the graphical presentation, with lighting and details that can sometimes draw gapes and awe. Most critically, the facial animation has drastically improved, with compelling facial performances matching vastly improved voice acting (with a few exceptions). Facial expressions in particular are very expressive and characters are given the chance to show a wide range of different emotions. And, after so many years of being irritated by hair clipping through faces, Bethesda has finally devised a system that creates decent facial hair and long hair that generally avoids clipping. It’s a small improvement, but for me it eliminates something that I’ve found irritating for a long time. Also, explosions look absolutely stunning. While a new sheen of graphical paint does the franchise a world of good, subtle changes to underlying systems create a familiar experience that offers fresh gameplay and narrative experience. The new dialogue system has been trimmed down to four responses for any given conversation. Some might see this as a limit to the number of choices you can make in any given scenario, much less than the various options Fallout 3 could potentially offer, but I think that the presentation and overall storytelling benefits from the more fleshed out dialogue. This also allows for the protagonist to be voiced and deliver lines, which leads to an actual character that feels more real than the voiceless husk players projected themselves into in Fallout 3. There are undeniably less dialogue options, but those that remain feel more meaningful. Bethesda’s overhaul of the gunplay is certainly the best improvement made from Fallout 3 to Fallout 4. It is actually possible to play the game entirely without using the VATS targeting system, as the shooting can now hold its own as a gameplay mechanic. It leads to a combat system that feels fluid, effortless transitioning between the tactical VATS view that allows for players to call their shots on specific body parts while slowing time and the often frantic shooting in real-time. It’s a simple, straightforward change, but it feels like the most necessary update to the franchise. While most of the changes have been overwhelmingly for the better, some wrinkles persist. The user interface for Fallout 4 feels muddled and messy. Forgetting the name of an important audio tape or note could leave you searching through your inventory for several minutes. Spending a scant few minutes searching through an inventory pales in comparison to one of Fallout 4’s biggest irritations: Finding dismissed companions. Every time a new companion is recruited, the previous companion can be sent to any settlement under the player’s control. At first this isn’t a huge problem, but once the pool of companions expands and you learn that you can only send one or two companions to the same settlement it becomes a colossal issue to track down a particular sidekick. At one point I spent almost two hours trying to find Preston Garvey, one of the first companions the game throws your way. Even if you manage to track down the right settlement it can be difficult to spot a human NPC milling around with the twenty other settlers living in your settlement. A small UI tweak noting where to find each of your recruited companions on the list of controlled settlements or a companion-only base would have been a huge help. One of the main systems that Fallout 4 introduces early on is the ability to control and build in settlements. Players are supposed to build structures that feed, water, and shelter potential settlers. The building mechanics are actually really fun and reward players who can’t help picking up everything they see. Building possesses one huge drawback: There is almost no incentive to do it. Building successful settlements doesn’t have a reward and never expands much past the initial concept. These settlers never come to your aid in a Wasteland war or provide amazing, unique items; they just wander around and sometimes do the jobs you assign to them. The building is fun, but that fun is its own reward. That doesn’t make it bad, I certainly enjoyed more than a few hours building settlements and growing them as large as possible. However, the lack of tangible benefits does make building defenses and homes feel like a time sink when you ultimately realize you could be exploring new locations, meeting new challenges, and interacting with interesting quests and characters. Conclusion: Despite the issues a new era have ushered into the franchise, I don’t feel like I’m being hyperbolic when I say that Bethesda’s latest venture into the post-apocalypse could very well be their best game to date. I’ve poured over 100 hours into Fallout 4 and, while I’ve finished the main campaign and a decent amount of exploration, there are still vast areas that remain undiscovered and unexamined. The irradiated area around Boston jealously guards some of its most potent secrets. To see and find everything would take hundreds more hours. That Fallout 4 managed to reach something raw and emotional in me after dozens of hours spent becoming desensitized to the misery and violence of the Commonwealth’s new world testifies to the underlying power at Bethesda’s fingertips. While almost every single Bethesda title has been revolutionary in some way and highly polished, Fallout 4 strikes me like the herald of something even better. I don’t know what that might be, but the developers have the talent to do something not just good or great, but something earthshattering; glimmers of that potential can be seen in Fallout 4. My time with Fallout 4 has been a roller coaster, both inside the game and in the real world. I started playing it the day it released, the day after my great aunt Winnie passed away. I continued to trek through the post-apocalypse as terror attacks unfolded in France, Lebanon, and Nigeria, an earthquake and tsunami hit Japan, and as I received news that one of my aunts has cancer. The world has seemed like a pretty horrible place for the last couple of weeks. Fully aware of the irony, I found comfort in the war-strewn, harsh, and violent landscapes of Fallout 4. Our world is a complicated place, full of shades of grey, competing agendas, and people who are perfectly willing to exemplify the worst of what humanity can be. Bethesda’s Fallout 4 has a lot of that, too, but it is also full of compelling characters that bring out the good in people. Even in that world of radiation and unchanging war, a city can rise from the ashes and people can stand up for one another. It reminded me that good exists out in our world, too; it can be easy to forget that when faced with hate and happenstance. Like Diamond City rising from the ruins of Boston, We can build our own communities while embracing our differences and looking out for one another… and that’s something I’d like to believe that’s what we’ve been doing here at Extra Life. So, thank you to all of you for being a force for good in a world that sometimes seems to have gone completely mad. Bethesda teased hope out of a scorched and tortured world and that hope is worth experiencing for yourself. Fallout 4 was reviewed on PC and is currently available for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. View full article
  16. There are tears in my eyes. As I step carefully through the dead halls of a long-opened vault, the haunting voice of Skeeter Davis serenades the end of the world. Skeletons of drug addicts, dead for centuries, lay around in their final poses, boney arms still grasping for their next fix. I know what happened here, about the experiments and the desperate, doomed struggle these people faced while imprisoned with the very things they sought to escape on the surface. And as I explore the remnants of their homes, I see the small stories that made up their lives. Two people, probably alcoholics, lay on the floor in front of a liquor cabinet. Another locked themselves in the bathroom and overdosed on psycho. One of the last rooms contains a small, scattered pile of supplies and a PC that holds the final journal entries for an inhabitant that tried to stay clean, but eventually gave in to the temptation and died with his friends. I see all these small tragedies play out as I explore the vault and I can feel my heart constrict in my chest as Davis sings of loss. “Why does my heart go on beating? Why do these eyes of mine cry? Don’t they know it’s the end of the world?” croons Skeeter Davis as I take in the stories. It all comes rushing in: The destruction of the old world; the callous cruelty with which the end was prepared; and all the rage, sorrow, and despair my character must feel after the incredible losses she has endured. It’s all brought to a sharp, poignant moment of empathy through Fallout 4’s brilliant storytelling and characterization. Many people think of story as something that is delivered through dialogue and text. However, games also tell many little stories through environment design. While Bethesda has a long tradition of skillfully telling stories through their environments, Fallout 4 has some of the best instances of this. There are hundreds of small stories waiting in the wasteland. Some require some detective-like snooping to uncover and others don’t even have markers on the map, but observant players will find these glimpses into pre-fallout life scattered everywhere. The stories themselves aren’t always the most interesting, but the sheer number of them give weight to the Boston area. This was a place that once teemed with human life and could again one day, if the factions at work in the Commonwealth could be left to their own devices. Unfortunately, the different factions of the Commonwealth can’t seem to leave one another alone and that tension ties in with the profound disaster that takes place in the opening minutes of Fallout 4. The journey to resolve the initial conflict that begins the protagonist’s journey serves as the crux of some of the game’s most interesting ethical dilemmas (that consequently have sweeping ramifications for the wider game). Those hard choices are kept grounded in a personal reality by the relationships that players build with their companions, NPCs who serve as actual characters with opinions on how the protagonist interacts with the world and its inhabitants. This improves dramatically on the follower system that has appeared in previous Bethesda titles, by endowing these friendly NPCs with real character bonds become stronger and decisions farther down the line become more difficult. You will remember the likes of Piper, Nick Valentine, and Curie long after your time with Fallout 4 comes to an end. Fallout 4 impresses me with the many improvements that take the elements established in Fallout 3 and brings them to the next level. The most easily seen improvement appears in the graphical presentation, with lighting and details that can sometimes draw gapes and awe. Most critically, the facial animation has drastically improved, with compelling facial performances matching vastly improved voice acting (with a few exceptions). Facial expressions in particular are very expressive and characters are given the chance to show a wide range of different emotions. And, after so many years of being irritated by hair clipping through faces, Bethesda has finally devised a system that creates decent facial hair and long hair that generally avoids clipping. It’s a small improvement, but for me it eliminates something that I’ve found irritating for a long time. Also, explosions look absolutely stunning. While a new sheen of graphical paint does the franchise a world of good, subtle changes to underlying systems create a familiar experience that offers fresh gameplay and narrative experience. The new dialogue system has been trimmed down to four responses for any given conversation. Some might see this as a limit to the number of choices you can make in any given scenario, much less than the various options Fallout 3 could potentially offer, but I think that the presentation and overall storytelling benefits from the more fleshed out dialogue. This also allows for the protagonist to be voiced and deliver lines, which leads to an actual character that feels more real than the voiceless husk players projected themselves into in Fallout 3. There are undeniably less dialogue options, but those that remain feel more meaningful. Bethesda’s overhaul of the gunplay is certainly the best improvement made from Fallout 3 to Fallout 4. It is actually possible to play the game entirely without using the VATS targeting system, as the shooting can now hold its own as a gameplay mechanic. It leads to a combat system that feels fluid, effortless transitioning between the tactical VATS view that allows for players to call their shots on specific body parts while slowing time and the often frantic shooting in real-time. It’s a simple, straightforward change, but it feels like the most necessary update to the franchise. While most of the changes have been overwhelmingly for the better, some wrinkles persist. The user interface for Fallout 4 feels muddled and messy. Forgetting the name of an important audio tape or note could leave you searching through your inventory for several minutes. Spending a scant few minutes searching through an inventory pales in comparison to one of Fallout 4’s biggest irritations: Finding dismissed companions. Every time a new companion is recruited, the previous companion can be sent to any settlement under the player’s control. At first this isn’t a huge problem, but once the pool of companions expands and you learn that you can only send one or two companions to the same settlement it becomes a colossal issue to track down a particular sidekick. At one point I spent almost two hours trying to find Preston Garvey, one of the first companions the game throws your way. Even if you manage to track down the right settlement it can be difficult to spot a human NPC milling around with the twenty other settlers living in your settlement. A small UI tweak noting where to find each of your recruited companions on the list of controlled settlements or a companion-only base would have been a huge help. One of the main systems that Fallout 4 introduces early on is the ability to control and build in settlements. Players are supposed to build structures that feed, water, and shelter potential settlers. The building mechanics are actually really fun and reward players who can’t help picking up everything they see. Building possesses one huge drawback: There is almost no incentive to do it. Building successful settlements doesn’t have a reward and never expands much past the initial concept. These settlers never come to your aid in a Wasteland war or provide amazing, unique items; they just wander around and sometimes do the jobs you assign to them. The building is fun, but that fun is its own reward. That doesn’t make it bad, I certainly enjoyed more than a few hours building settlements and growing them as large as possible. However, the lack of tangible benefits does make building defenses and homes feel like a time sink when you ultimately realize you could be exploring new locations, meeting new challenges, and interacting with interesting quests and characters. Conclusion: Despite the issues a new era have ushered into the franchise, I don’t feel like I’m being hyperbolic when I say that Bethesda’s latest venture into the post-apocalypse could very well be their best game to date. I’ve poured over 100 hours into Fallout 4 and, while I’ve finished the main campaign and a decent amount of exploration, there are still vast areas that remain undiscovered and unexamined. The irradiated area around Boston jealously guards some of its most potent secrets. To see and find everything would take hundreds more hours. That Fallout 4 managed to reach something raw and emotional in me after dozens of hours spent becoming desensitized to the misery and violence of the Commonwealth’s new world testifies to the underlying power at Bethesda’s fingertips. While almost every single Bethesda title has been revolutionary in some way and highly polished, Fallout 4 strikes me like the herald of something even better. I don’t know what that might be, but the developers have the talent to do something not just good or great, but something earthshattering; glimmers of that potential can be seen in Fallout 4. My time with Fallout 4 has been a roller coaster, both inside the game and in the real world. I started playing it the day it released, the day after my great aunt Winnie passed away. I continued to trek through the post-apocalypse as terror attacks unfolded in France, Lebanon, and Nigeria, an earthquake and tsunami hit Japan, and as I received news that one of my aunts has cancer. The world has seemed like a pretty horrible place for the last couple of weeks. Fully aware of the irony, I found comfort in the war-strewn, harsh, and violent landscapes of Fallout 4. Our world is a complicated place, full of shades of grey, competing agendas, and people who are perfectly willing to exemplify the worst of what humanity can be. Bethesda’s Fallout 4 has a lot of that, too, but it is also full of compelling characters that bring out the good in people. Even in that world of radiation and unchanging war, a city can rise from the ashes and people can stand up for one another. It reminded me that good exists out in our world, too; it can be easy to forget that when faced with hate and happenstance. Like Diamond City rising from the ruins of Boston, We can build our own communities while embracing our differences and looking out for one another… and that’s something I’d like to believe that’s what we’ve been doing here at Extra Life. So, thank you to all of you for being a force for good in a world that sometimes seems to have gone completely mad. Bethesda teased hope out of a scorched and tortured world and that hope is worth experiencing for yourself. Fallout 4 was reviewed on PC and is currently available for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.
  17. A ton of amazing games came out during 2015. Jeremy, Daniel, and Jack bring their number one game of the year along with one honorable mention apiece. What game will be remembered as one of the best games period in several years? Feel free to share your top pick and honorable mention in the comments. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it (though this week's is delayed due to recording late)! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod Outro music: Metal Gear Solid 3 'Innocent Deception' by Claire Yaxley and Dj Mystix (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02573) New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  18. A ton of amazing games came out during 2015. Jeremy, Daniel, and Jack bring their number one game of the year along with one honorable mention apiece. What game will be remembered as one of the best games period in several years? Feel free to share your top pick and honorable mention in the comments. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it (though this week's is delayed due to recording late)! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod Outro music: Metal Gear Solid 3 'Innocent Deception' by Claire Yaxley and Dj Mystix (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02573) New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  19. If you were hoping for a new massively open world set on the continent of Tamriel any time soon, you might want to adjust your expectations. Dualshockers spoke recently with Pete Hines, Bethesda's VP of marketing, about The Elder Scrolls Online. When asked about a follow-up to Skyrim, Hines stated that he didn't think we would be seeing another single-player Elder Scrolls title "for a very long time." Instead, the company will be focusing all of its attention on DLC for The Elder Scrolls Online and Fallout 4's core game, DLC, and mod support. Once all of that is done we might hear about a new Elder Scrolls, but we could also always hear about a new IP. Fallout 4 is currently slated for release in November. View full article
  20. If you were hoping for a new massively open world set on the continent of Tamriel any time soon, you might want to adjust your expectations. Dualshockers spoke recently with Pete Hines, Bethesda's VP of marketing, about The Elder Scrolls Online. When asked about a follow-up to Skyrim, Hines stated that he didn't think we would be seeing another single-player Elder Scrolls title "for a very long time." Instead, the company will be focusing all of its attention on DLC for The Elder Scrolls Online and Fallout 4's core game, DLC, and mod support. Once all of that is done we might hear about a new Elder Scrolls, but we could also always hear about a new IP. Fallout 4 is currently slated for release in November.
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