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  2. brentmccaleb

    Interested in 2018

    Hello everyone, This is Dr. Brent McCaleb from Bayfront Health St Petersburg and All Children's Hospital. I am the Chief Resident for the upcoming year of the Family Medicine Residency at Bayfront. We work very closely with the Pediatric Residency at All Children's Hospital. Several of us are avid gamers. I speak on behalf of the Family Medicine Residents and we would like to join in this years Extra Life event. I would love to speak with the leaders of the guild to see what we could help with. Looking forward to hearing from you all!
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  6. McKenzie Olivas

    Guild Meeting

    Sounds great, can't wait to meet everybody!
  7. Welcome to the May 2018 monthly roundup of events and news for the Extra Life Calgary Guild. Neighbour Day Event - BYOBGBBQ (Bring Your Own Board Game BBQ) Join the Extra Life Calgary Guild this Neighbour Day for fun, food, and board games: Saturday, June 16, 2018 starting at 11am Edworthy Park, Site 6 Bring your own board games and picnic blankets. BBQ food available with donation. Check out more information about the event on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/2047255765489120/ Guild Meeting (on Discord this month) Wednesday, May 30, 2018 from 6:30-8:30pm This meeting will be held virtually through our Discord at https://discord.gg/YNPXN2j Everyone is welcome to attend the meeting, and volunteers are always welcome. *** Thanks for reading! If you'd like to keep up to date with us, we'll be posting monthly round-ups right here and you can also find us on Twitter @ExtralifeYYC or on Facebook at Extra Life Calgary Guild
  8. Take a journey with us back to the ye olden days of 2009 when the war between casual and hardcore gamers raged. While it would take many years for the conflict to settle to a low simmer, one game seemed to unite the two sides in harmony; a tower defense game with retro roots, a sunny disposition, and a quirky sense of humor. Plants vs. Zombies catapulted developer PopCap Games to indie stardom and became their fastest selling game to date, leveraging a position in the then-curated Steam store to appeal to the hardcore crowd and its inherent lightheartedness to bring in the more casually oriented gamers. Almost ten years later, should Plants vs. Zombies be considered one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past 'Fushigina Forest' by Laura Shigihara (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02329) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  9. Take a journey with us back to the ye olden days of 2009 when the war between casual and hardcore gamers raged. While it would take many years for the conflict to settle to a low simmer, one game seemed to unite the two sides in harmony; a tower defense game with retro roots, a sunny disposition, and a quirky sense of humor. Plants vs. Zombies catapulted developer PopCap Games to indie stardom and became their fastest selling game to date, leveraging a position in the then-curated Steam store to appeal to the hardcore crowd and its inherent lightheartedness to bring in the more casually oriented gamers. Almost ten years later, should Plants vs. Zombies be considered one of the best games of all-time? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past 'Fushigina Forest' by Laura Shigihara (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02329) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  10. Emokidcries

    Game nights!!!

    Hi Lifers!!! As discussed at the recent guild meeting looking at doing a game night this Friday 25th of May 2018 from 7 pm - 12 am If you could please vote for the games below: 1. ultimate chicken horse 2. Magika 3. Keep talking or we all explode 4. League of legends 5. Player unknown battlegrounds 6. Fortnite 7. Any others one could suggest.
  11. Beth

    Registered? Now What?

    Welcome new members of the Atlanta Extra Life community! While your personal extra-life.org participant pages offer tons of suggestions with next steps after registration, the Extra Life Atlanta Guild has compiled additional resources in the Google Docs link below to further your Extra Life efforts. Check out the list below and be sure to reach out with any questions...or ideas! Thank you for your continued support of our miracles! Extra Life Atlanta: Additional Local Support Materials: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1qzYvFoB0mdSxSYcVQDlHwVYjBxjiRraP?usp=sharing Extra Life/CMN/CHOA social media handles EL 2018 CHOA Funding Area EL Volunteer Tip Sheet**includes EL and CHOA talking points great to share with supporters! EL Overview EL Workplace/Community Engagement Opportunities---*coming soon to include Game Day Marathon 2018 ticket/sponsorship details EL Multimedia Kit: here Seeking a few Extra Life ideas from a pro? Check out supporter, Lizzy "JEZ" Fountain's Extra Life page for some great tips and ideas! Beth Agee Program Coordinator, Children's Miracle Network Hospitals Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Foundation P: 404.785.7366 | E: beth.agee@choa.org www.choa.org/cmn
  12. herobyclicking

    Eastern Indiana

    Welcome @Nerdishgeek! Be sure to check out our Best Practices and Articles on the community site! Don't forget to join the official Extra Life Discord too! https://discord.gg/extralife4kids Thanks for taking a look at the forums Chad! I try to monitor new people coming to the community and redirect to more active areas.
  13. Chuckles

    Eastern Indiana

    Welcome Vinnie. My name is Chad and I'm on our guild development committee. I know that in the past we haven't used the community pages because we've found them horrible to navigate so we've mostly just used our Facebook page and Discord channel. I've provided links to both for you. I know that we've discussed the need to be more active in the community pages, but none of us has done a terribly good job of that yet. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ExtraLifeIndianapolis/ Discord: https://discord.gg/a4nYNTh
  14. Nerdishgeek

    Eastern Indiana

    Hello everyone! My name is Vinnie and I just learned about this Extra Life through school. I was excited to see something like this and immediatly signed up. I am located over here in East Central Indiana, I noticed there isn't much activity here on the guild. Is there a reason? I was kind of hoping we we're more active.
  15. NodnarbDude

    May Guild Meeting Recap

    Hey everyone this is the recap for th meeting this past Saturday. We had a meeting over discord since several people couldn't make it in person. Attendence-5 via discord We talked a bit about some of the conventions that are coming up. Prattcon-June 23rd (10am-3pm) This is a one day con at the southeast anchor Enoch pratt free library. John and I will be manning a table here. Diversitycon(11am-8pm) This is also a one day con at the comic shop Amazing Spiral in north baltimore. James said he should be available this day and will likely be manning a table here for part of the day as well. Otakon (Aug. 10th-12th) this is confirmed. james will more than likely be out of town,Drew will be there all weekend and will likely be able to setup and takedown, I will be available periodically thoughout the weekend. we can talk more detail on schedules as the time gets closer. these are some unconfirmed cons that we are waiting to hear back from. more info to come Artscape(July 20th-22nd) Blerdcon(July 27th) Bitgen(July 28th) We are still looking into the gametruck idea and seeing if they are still partnered with Extra Life and if we can do something with 98 rock. more details to come. OUR NEXT MEETINGS our next meeting will be via discord on june 16th at 12pm Our next in person meeting will be july 14th at Savage Mill Next Game Day Our game day this past friday sortof fell through so we are doing one this coming friday the 25th from 7pm-midnight. some suggested games were -keep talking and nobody explodes -ultimate chicken horse -monoco (there were a few others but these were the only ones i caught the names of, sorry)
  16. Every year since 2011, Sega-Addicts.com has done a Dreamcast Dreamless 24-Hour Marathon. From 2015 forward I have taken the reigns and hosted it from my home with staff members and friends joining. Most recently we learned about Extra Life and thought the Marathon was a great chance to raise some money! Collectively over the last two years we have raised over $1,500 for a local children's hospital! And now we are inviting all of you to join us on the internet to raise money for kids while enjoying Sega's last great console on 09/01/2018. This year, we are hosting from the Mega Visions Magazine Twitch page and more ready than ever to tackle some Dreamcast insanity to help the kids! You can check out last year's marathon on YouTube here. Stay tuned for the final schedule in the coming months! We also have a Reddit topic for game recommendations here! Now the die-hard Dreamcast fans will immediately notice we are not celebrating on the actual anniversary (09/09/99) of the console. We are celebrating on Labor Day weekend to allow easier travel for the out-of-towners. We hope you understand and decided to join the insanity on Twitch! Thanks for taking a look, folks. If you feel like helping out, you can print the flyer from the group page and share to all!
  17. Ceraph1216

    May guild meeting

    Just a reminder that today's meeting is now ONLY on Discord! Hope to hear from you all :D
  18. Marcus Stewart

    Review: Florence

    Finding love for the first time can be the best thing to ever happen. Just ask Florence Yeoh, a 25-year old aspiring artist, who feels trapped in her monotonous daily routine. Her office job bores her. An overbearing mother routinely hounds her about finding a boyfriend. Life appears generally unfulfilling–until she stumbles upon a charming musician named Krish. Their friendship soon blossoms into something more, and Florence’s world expands as a result. Mountains’ debut title takes players through the ups and downs of this relationship, delivering a message that’s moving in its sincerity. Florence and Krish’s short and sweet journey takes about 30 minutes to get through. Despite its whimsical presentation the story comes off as overwhelmingly honest and written from a place of experience. Nothing feels heavy-handed or contrived. I related to Florence’s high of unlimited hope during her initial honeymoon period. Watching the pair have their first fight while grocery shopping felt comically on-point (the first grocery trip with a partner will always be a minefield for conflict). If you’ve experienced even a mildly serious relationship, odds are Florence’s tale will resonate on some level. The couple’s happy times are genuinely heartwarming, but the story makes its biggest impact during the rough patches. Primarily because it does a great job of portraying how things have to get worse in order for life to become better–much to our chagrin. Discussing specifics without spoiling is tough. However, the conclusion wonderfully illustrates the little ways that love helps us grow beyond just living happily ever after. I’m no pessimist, but I walked away from the game with an even greater positive outlook on relationships overall. Despite the heavy doses of mushy stuff, Florence is still a video game–a good playing one at that. The inventive and varied touch controls charmed me with how they successfully game-ify the elements of dating. For example, conversing on the first date requires piecing together the puzzle of a dialogue bubble. The more dates that occur, the easier the puzzle becomes–a brilliant method of illustrating Florence’s growing comfort around Krish. Other interactions range from emotionally affecting to just plain cute. I smiled while designing Florence’s childhood art pieces. Turning a clock and watching photos of her friends gradually age and drift apart bummed me out in its truthfulness. Gameplay even teaches the give and take couples go through each day. When Krish moves in, deciding which of Florence’s belongings to box up in order to make room for his stuff acts as an effective exercise in compromise. Rapidly completing word bubbles to out-talk Krish during a fight made me consider easing up to balance the debate. Despite having no idea why they were arguing, for some reason I didn’t want to appear domineering. Who knows; you just might discover a little bit about your own behavior as a girlfriend or boyfriend. I’d be remiss to not praise Florence’s presentation. In short, the comic strip-esque art design and animations look fantastic. A phenomenal soundtrack primarily consisting of piano and violin arrangements effectively convey emotional turns in place of voice acting. The score stands alongside my favorites of the year. I even left the game idle at times just to enjoy it. Conclusion: Florence paints an honest and affecting love story backed by imaginative gameplay. Depending on your love life, past or present, the game can easily strike an emotional cord at several spots. Tack on charming interactions, top-notch music, and a digestible length, and Florence stands as one of the most thoughtful and touching experiences of 2018.
  19. Marcus Stewart

    Feature: Review: Florence

    Finding love for the first time can be the best thing to ever happen. Just ask Florence Yeoh, a 25-year old aspiring artist, who feels trapped in her monotonous daily routine. Her office job bores her. An overbearing mother routinely hounds her about finding a boyfriend. Life appears generally unfulfilling–until she stumbles upon a charming musician named Krish. Their friendship soon blossoms into something more, and Florence’s world expands as a result. Mountains’ debut title takes players through the ups and downs of this relationship, delivering a message that’s moving in its sincerity. Florence and Krish’s short and sweet journey takes about 30 minutes to get through. Despite its whimsical presentation the story comes off as overwhelmingly honest and written from a place of experience. Nothing feels heavy-handed or contrived. I related to Florence’s high of unlimited hope during her initial honeymoon period. Watching the pair have their first fight while grocery shopping felt comically on-point (the first grocery trip with a partner will always be a minefield for conflict). If you’ve experienced even a mildly serious relationship, odds are Florence’s tale will resonate on some level. The couple’s happy times are genuinely heartwarming, but the story makes its biggest impact during the rough patches. Primarily because it does a great job of portraying how things have to get worse in order for life to become better–much to our chagrin. Discussing specifics without spoiling is tough. However, the conclusion wonderfully illustrates the little ways that love helps us grow beyond just living happily ever after. I’m no pessimist, but I walked away from the game with an even greater positive outlook on relationships overall. Despite the heavy doses of mushy stuff, Florence is still a video game–a good playing one at that. The inventive and varied touch controls charmed me with how they successfully game-ify the elements of dating. For example, conversing on the first date requires piecing together the puzzle of a dialogue bubble. The more dates that occur, the easier the puzzle becomes–a brilliant method of illustrating Florence’s growing comfort around Krish. Other interactions range from emotionally affecting to just plain cute. I smiled while designing Florence’s childhood art pieces. Turning a clock and watching photos of her friends gradually age and drift apart bummed me out in its truthfulness. Gameplay even teaches the give and take couples go through each day. When Krish moves in, deciding which of Florence’s belongings to box up in order to make room for his stuff acts as an effective exercise in compromise. Rapidly completing word bubbles to out-talk Krish during a fight made me consider easing up to balance the debate. Despite having no idea why they were arguing, for some reason I didn’t want to appear domineering. Who knows; you just might discover a little bit about your own behavior as a girlfriend or boyfriend. I’d be remiss to not praise Florence’s presentation. In short, the comic strip-esque art design and animations look fantastic. A phenomenal soundtrack primarily consisting of piano and violin arrangements effectively convey emotional turns in place of voice acting. The score stands alongside my favorites of the year. I even left the game idle at times just to enjoy it. Conclusion: Florence paints an honest and affecting love story backed by imaginative gameplay. Depending on your love life, past or present, the game can easily strike an emotional cord at several spots. Tack on charming interactions, top-notch music, and a digestible length, and Florence stands as one of the most thoughtful and touching experiences of 2018. View full article
  20. It's hard for people to game if they don't have reliable control over two hands. That very simple premise has given rise to various organizations like dedicated to hacking traditional controllers or even fabricating entirely new and specialized controllers on an individual basis for wounded veterans, people born with disabilities, and those who have been through traumatic accidents. These groups, like AbleGamers or Warfighter Engaged, have spent years working to find solutions for people who love gaming, but find it difficult or even impossible to use a traditional controller. Yesterday, Microsoft announced something amazing: The Xbox Adaptive Controller. This device will release later this year and can be customized to a very wide variety of specialized peripherals to create set ups that anyone can play with regardless of physical ability. The back of the controller has clearly labeled plug-ins for a variety of external buttons, switches, and joysticks that can then be physically placed anywhere for the most convenient use by the player. It can be used to play Xbox One and Windows 10 PC titles and supports button remapping. It can even save three different game profiles so that it can switch seamlessly between different game types on the fly. Solomon Romney, a retail learning specialist for Microsoft, has had months to test out the final build of the Adaptive Controller. "I can customize how I interface with the Xbox Adaptive Controller to whatever I want," he said. “If I want to play a game entirely with my feet, I can. I can make the controls fit my body, my desires, and I can change them anytime I want. You plug in whatever you want and go. It takes virtually no time to set it up and use it. It could not be simpler." Romney was born without fingers on his left hand, which makes operating a traditional controller difficult. "I get to redesign my controller every day and get to choose how I want to play. For me, that's the greatest thing ever." For Microsoft and the people who worked on the Adaptive Controller, this is the culmination of years of effort to justify the creation of a niche peripheral designed for an often under-served group of gamers. The journey began back in 2014 when Twitter, through a twist of fate, connected a Microsoft engineer with Warfighter Engaged, a nonprofit that works with wounded veterans to keep them gaming. The organization's founder, Ken Jones, was a mechanical engineer and struggled to create gaming equipment to meet the specific needs of all the veterans who came to Warfighter Engaged seeking help. That connection blossomed into an awareness at Microsoft for this underlying need in the game industry for accessible gaming equipment. The next year, Microsoft held its annual Ability Summit, an event dedicated to getting the company to consider accessibility in its devices and solutions. For a hackathon tournament, the winning entry was a device that was able to work with the Kinect to track movement and read those as button and joystick inputs on a traditional controller. Another team took that idea and refined it into a prototype device that could attach to an Xbox One controller and allow other input devices to be connected. Around the same time, Microsoft launched the Gaming for Everyone initiative with the goal of broadening the community of people who can play and enjoy games. Headed by Kris Hunter, the director of devices user research and hardware accessibility, and Bryce Johnson, a senior Xbox designer, the initiative worked quietly to make the Adaptive Controller a reality. What really solidified the idea of what the Adaptive Controller would eventually be was the launch of the Xbox One's Copilot feature in 2017. Copilot allows players to link two Xbox One controllers as if they were one device. The original idea was that it would allow players to play a single player game together without transferring a controller back and forth. However, they discovered it was also used by those with disabilities to game in creative ways Microsoft hadn't expected, such as using a head or foot to operate the second controller. That realization brought together all of the different ideas that Microsoft had been toying with since that chance 2014 Twitter encounter. Instead of using a device like that from the hackathon or the subsequent controller add-on, Copilot could be used to attach a device that allowed for more flexible gaming inputs that could cater to a wide variety of people. Making a device like that would allow for it to be sleek, elegant, even. It wouldn't be an afterthought, but a fully executed and produced device worthy of the Microsoft brand. Those pushing for the device to make it to retail apparently met with internal opposition to the idea, but advocates like Kris Hunter wouldn't let the idea die. "I had a passion for it and I didn't give up," she said. "I kept saying, 'This product is too important. [...] If we really want to be intentional and we really want to walk the walk versus just talk the talk, this is the product that will do it." Microsoft turned to the nonprofits who had helped bring this niche to light at the very beginning. Warfighter Engaged, AbleGamers, SpecialEffect, Craig Hospital, and the Cerebral Palsy Foundation, came together to consult on how to best design a controller that would fit the needs of the people they worked with every day. Ideas like spreading out the 19 input jacks across the back of the device to make them easier to differentiate, a rectangular shape to make it comfortable in a gamer's lap, or threaded inserts to secure the controller to a standard wheelchair, lapboard, or desk all came about from conversations with these nonprofits. The The design process even led to something Microsoft is considering adding to all future products - a groove above each port to provide a tactile reference for where things are supposed to be plugged in. "One message heard clearly from the accessibility community was 'don't infantilize the device' — don't make it look like a Fisher-Price toy," said Bryce Johnson. "People often don't want to use adaptive technology because it looks like a toy." That became a guiding principal behind the design of the Adaptive Controller. First and foremost, Microsoft wanted the Adaptive Controller to be something proudly carrying the brand as a symbol; something that adults wouldn't feel embarrassed to use in front of friends or family. With a price of $100, the Adaptive Controller positions itself as the most affordable option for those looking for accessibility solutions in gaming. The price is an important to keep in mind for all of the hospitals and patients out there who previously needed to find a custom build for their particular needs or forgo gaming completely. If the work we're doing to raise money for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals through Extra Life can go toward helping kids rediscover their ability to game with the help of the Xbox Adaptive Controller... well, that's an incredibly exciting thing. The Xbox Adaptive Controller will release later this year and we will likely receive more details when E3 rolls around. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games! View full article
  21. It's hard for people to game if they don't have reliable control over two hands. That very simple premise has given rise to various organizations like dedicated to hacking traditional controllers or even fabricating entirely new and specialized controllers on an individual basis for wounded veterans, people born with disabilities, and those who have been through traumatic accidents. These groups, like AbleGamers or Warfighter Engaged, have spent years working to find solutions for people who love gaming, but find it difficult or even impossible to use a traditional controller. Yesterday, Microsoft announced something amazing: The Xbox Adaptive Controller. This device will release later this year and can be customized to a very wide variety of specialized peripherals to create set ups that anyone can play with regardless of physical ability. The back of the controller has clearly labeled plug-ins for a variety of external buttons, switches, and joysticks that can then be physically placed anywhere for the most convenient use by the player. It can be used to play Xbox One and Windows 10 PC titles and supports button remapping. It can even save three different game profiles so that it can switch seamlessly between different game types on the fly. Solomon Romney, a retail learning specialist for Microsoft, has had months to test out the final build of the Adaptive Controller. "I can customize how I interface with the Xbox Adaptive Controller to whatever I want," he said. “If I want to play a game entirely with my feet, I can. I can make the controls fit my body, my desires, and I can change them anytime I want. You plug in whatever you want and go. It takes virtually no time to set it up and use it. It could not be simpler." Romney was born without fingers on his left hand, which makes operating a traditional controller difficult. "I get to redesign my controller every day and get to choose how I want to play. For me, that's the greatest thing ever." For Microsoft and the people who worked on the Adaptive Controller, this is the culmination of years of effort to justify the creation of a niche peripheral designed for an often under-served group of gamers. The journey began back in 2014 when Twitter, through a twist of fate, connected a Microsoft engineer with Warfighter Engaged, a nonprofit that works with wounded veterans to keep them gaming. The organization's founder, Ken Jones, was a mechanical engineer and struggled to create gaming equipment to meet the specific needs of all the veterans who came to Warfighter Engaged seeking help. That connection blossomed into an awareness at Microsoft for this underlying need in the game industry for accessible gaming equipment. The next year, Microsoft held its annual Ability Summit, an event dedicated to getting the company to consider accessibility in its devices and solutions. For a hackathon tournament, the winning entry was a device that was able to work with the Kinect to track movement and read those as button and joystick inputs on a traditional controller. Another team took that idea and refined it into a prototype device that could attach to an Xbox One controller and allow other input devices to be connected. Around the same time, Microsoft launched the Gaming for Everyone initiative with the goal of broadening the community of people who can play and enjoy games. Headed by Kris Hunter, the director of devices user research and hardware accessibility, and Bryce Johnson, a senior Xbox designer, the initiative worked quietly to make the Adaptive Controller a reality. What really solidified the idea of what the Adaptive Controller would eventually be was the launch of the Xbox One's Copilot feature in 2017. Copilot allows players to link two Xbox One controllers as if they were one device. The original idea was that it would allow players to play a single player game together without transferring a controller back and forth. However, they discovered it was also used by those with disabilities to game in creative ways Microsoft hadn't expected, such as using a head or foot to operate the second controller. That realization brought together all of the different ideas that Microsoft had been toying with since that chance 2014 Twitter encounter. Instead of using a device like that from the hackathon or the subsequent controller add-on, Copilot could be used to attach a device that allowed for more flexible gaming inputs that could cater to a wide variety of people. Making a device like that would allow for it to be sleek, elegant, even. It wouldn't be an afterthought, but a fully executed and produced device worthy of the Microsoft brand. Those pushing for the device to make it to retail apparently met with internal opposition to the idea, but advocates like Kris Hunter wouldn't let the idea die. "I had a passion for it and I didn't give up," she said. "I kept saying, 'This product is too important. [...] If we really want to be intentional and we really want to walk the walk versus just talk the talk, this is the product that will do it." Microsoft turned to the nonprofits who had helped bring this niche to light at the very beginning. Warfighter Engaged, AbleGamers, SpecialEffect, Craig Hospital, and the Cerebral Palsy Foundation, came together to consult on how to best design a controller that would fit the needs of the people they worked with every day. Ideas like spreading out the 19 input jacks across the back of the device to make them easier to differentiate, a rectangular shape to make it comfortable in a gamer's lap, or threaded inserts to secure the controller to a standard wheelchair, lapboard, or desk all came about from conversations with these nonprofits. The The design process even led to something Microsoft is considering adding to all future products - a groove above each port to provide a tactile reference for where things are supposed to be plugged in. "One message heard clearly from the accessibility community was 'don't infantilize the device' — don't make it look like a Fisher-Price toy," said Bryce Johnson. "People often don't want to use adaptive technology because it looks like a toy." That became a guiding principal behind the design of the Adaptive Controller. First and foremost, Microsoft wanted the Adaptive Controller to be something proudly carrying the brand as a symbol; something that adults wouldn't feel embarrassed to use in front of friends or family. With a price of $100, the Adaptive Controller positions itself as the most affordable option for those looking for accessibility solutions in gaming. The price is an important to keep in mind for all of the hospitals and patients out there who previously needed to find a custom build for their particular needs or forgo gaming completely. If the work we're doing to raise money for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals through Extra Life can go toward helping kids rediscover their ability to game with the help of the Xbox Adaptive Controller... well, that's an incredibly exciting thing. The Xbox Adaptive Controller will release later this year and we will likely receive more details when E3 rolls around. Don't forget to sign up for Extra Life to help sick and injured kids in hospitals around the US and Canada by playing games!
  22. NodnarbDude

    May guild meeting

    just a friendly reminder this month's guild meeting is this Saturday the 19th(tomorrow) at the Family Game Store in Savage Mill! The address is 8600 Foundry st., Savage MD 20763 We'll be meeting around noon P.S. it looks like im going to have to join via discord tomorrow. Hope to hear yall then!
  23. KnightHarbinger

    Extra Life Tattoos - Got one? Know of one? Do tell!

    I demand moar Extra Life/Gaming related tattoos from the communiteh!! ;0 ;~) o/ Sent from my Blackphone 2 using Tapatalk
  24. KnightHarbinger

    In Kind Donations

    Yes. Also be sure to as much as possible relate/associate those in-kind donations with your gaming group only. Keeping as separated as possible if not entirely from Extra Life in any communications. Printed, verbal, or otherwise. Ultimately unless your operating your own 501©(3), in which case as per IRS guidelines you could issue a donations tax receipt, its best/safest to have them donate teh cash monies to your team. Where Extra Life proper issues one by email each time anyone gets a donation to their donations page. o/ Sent from my Blackphone 2 using Tapatalk
  25. KnightHarbinger

    Use caution with the word "Raffle" in your fundraising efforts!

    Was providing some fundraising guidance to a fellow extra life teammate and thought I'd give this thread a bump for the "2018 Folks". o/ Sent from my Blackphone 2 using Tapatalk
  26. KnightHarbinger

    2018 Humble Bundles Partner Linked with Extra Life

    Humble Bundle - Buy Galactic Civilizations II: Ultimate Edition from the Humble Store https://www.humblebundle.com/store/galactic-civilizations-ii-ultimate-edition?partner=144206
  27. Earlier
  28. path1811

    Guild Meeting

    Hi everyone! It has been a little while since we have been active on here but now it is time to announce our next Guild Meeting in Fresno. We have a full agenda of things that have happened and things that will happen. New members, new groups that will help us create great things and lots of ideas.. It all comes down to, how can we help the Kids in the Central Valley! The meeting will take place at Club One Casino in Downtown Fresno on May 31st at 6.30 pm. Here is the Address, please comment below if you are able to make it. 1033 Van Ness Ave Fresno, CA 93721 We are looking forward to seeing everyone! ~Patrick
  29. KnightHarbinger

    2018 Humble Bundles Partner Linked with Extra Life

    Humble Book Bundle: Cosplay 2.0 https://www.humblebundle.com/books/cosplay2-books?partner=144206
  30. KnightHarbinger

    2018 Humble Bundles Partner Linked with Extra Life

    Extra Life (@ExtraLife4Kids) You'll be in your element with this @humblebundle of multiplayer games. Get #rocketleague, #besiege, Stick Fight: The Game, Tumblestone and more, all while supporting #EXTRALIFE: https://t.co/wdeKHKRqUI #humblebundle
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