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Found 48 results

  1. Say Farewell to Miiverse

    It looks like the time has come to shut off the lights on some of Nintendo's older services. Nintendo has announced that they will be discontinuing Nintendo TVii, Wii U Chat, and Miiverse on November 7th 10pm PT. All functions associated with Miiverse on Wii U, 3DS, PC, or smart phones will cease to function across all titles. For example, the messages left in New Super Mario Bros. U or WaraWara Plaza will no longer be shown. A workaround is planned for Super Mario Maker that will allow players to continue uploading courses. After November 7th, players attempting to access these services on Wii U or 3DS will receive error codes. If you're left scratching your head regarding Nintendo TVii - the service was discontinued in North America two years ago, but continued to operate in Japan. If you have made some awesome memories that you want to share, Nintendo is offering a limited window of time during which people can download their post history to PC. You can make a request by visiting this page and clicking the "Request Post History" button at the bottom. Nintendo released more information about this process: By making this request, you will be able to download your posts – plus any screenshots saved to your album – to your PC after the Miiverse service has ended. To use this download service, you will need to have a Nintendo Account linked with your Nintendo Network ID, and must make the download request before the Miiverse service ends. [...] From all of us at Nintendo, we sincerely thank you for supporting Miiverse all these years. We hope you’ll continue using Miiverse until the service ends. If you make your request, you will receive an email when the service closes down that includes a download link containing gall of your posts and screenshots. Unfortunately, this will not include any comments made on your posts, messages sent to and from friends, deleted messages, or anything that violated the Miiverse Code of Conduct.
  2. It looks like the time has come to shut off the lights on some of Nintendo's older services. Nintendo has announced that they will be discontinuing Nintendo TVii, Wii U Chat, and Miiverse on November 7th 10pm PT. All functions associated with Miiverse on Wii U, 3DS, PC, or smart phones will cease to function across all titles. For example, the messages left in New Super Mario Bros. U or WaraWara Plaza will no longer be shown. A workaround is planned for Super Mario Maker that will allow players to continue uploading courses. After November 7th, players attempting to access these services on Wii U or 3DS will receive error codes. If you're left scratching your head regarding Nintendo TVii - the service was discontinued in North America two years ago, but continued to operate in Japan. If you have made some awesome memories that you want to share, Nintendo is offering a limited window of time during which people can download their post history to PC. You can make a request by visiting this page and clicking the "Request Post History" button at the bottom. Nintendo released more information about this process: By making this request, you will be able to download your posts – plus any screenshots saved to your album – to your PC after the Miiverse service has ended. To use this download service, you will need to have a Nintendo Account linked with your Nintendo Network ID, and must make the download request before the Miiverse service ends. [...] From all of us at Nintendo, we sincerely thank you for supporting Miiverse all these years. We hope you’ll continue using Miiverse until the service ends. If you make your request, you will receive an email when the service closes down that includes a download link containing gall of your posts and screenshots. Unfortunately, this will not include any comments made on your posts, messages sent to and from friends, deleted messages, or anything that violated the Miiverse Code of Conduct. View full article
  3. BioWare has created some of the most beloved moments in gaming history. The Mass Effect series stands as one of the greatest gaming trilogies of all time. However, many people point toward the conclusion of Mass Effect 3 as something that undid all of the goodwill the series had fostered up until that point. For all of their talent, BioWare also created one of the single most divisive and negatively received moments in gaming history. In Part One of our Mass Effect 3 discussion, we talked about the larger game leading up to the final minutes that threw the Mass Effect fan base into chaos. Part Two covers the ending and touches on some aspects of the DLC. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Myst III: Exile 'American Wheels of Wonder' by Mazedude (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01749) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  4. BioWare has created some of the most beloved moments in gaming history. The Mass Effect series stands as one of the greatest gaming trilogies of all time. However, many people point toward the conclusion of Mass Effect 3 as something that undid all of the goodwill the series had fostered up until that point. For all of their talent, BioWare also created one of the single most divisive and negatively received moments in gaming history. In Part One of our Mass Effect 3 discussion, we talked about the larger game leading up to the final minutes that threw the Mass Effect fan base into chaos. Part Two covers the ending and touches on some aspects of the DLC. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Myst III: Exile 'American Wheels of Wonder' by Mazedude (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01749) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  5. Modern games are fantastic. The internet can fix broken games or give long dead titles new life. There are a myriad of benefits to the way gaming today differs from that of the past. One of the less appreciated benefits is translation and localization, which has brought western audiences a huge number of titles from Japan and vice versa. And because of that exchange of gaming, language has become critical to how many people appreciate titles. For some, there is only one "correct" language in which to enjoy certain games or sometimes a game simply sounds better to some of its players in a different language because of the different voice actors used in the localization process. That's why, despite near universal acclaim, some fans of The The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild were disappointed that its western release didn't include the Japanese language version of the game that some saw in the original trailers. Though there were no gameplay differences, some players truly preferred the way the Japanese version sounded over the English version - many attributing this difference to the quality of the voice acting. A separate camp in the community grew to similarly clamor for the Japanese version, not because they could understand the game better, but specifically because they couldn't understand the vocals. The Legend of Zelda has traditionally avoided voice acting in the series and this small subset of gamers preferred a version of the game that they could enjoy in the same way - even if the language used was real - as long as they couldn't understand and had to rely on subtitles like the older games in the series. Nintendo released a patch for Breath of the Wild today that allows players to turn on Japanese audio for their action-adventure critical darling. Players can find the option in the game's main menu after updating and switch over to Japanese, Spanish, German, or Italian. If you're worried that you will inadvertently switch over all the text, too, never fear! Switching over only affects audio. Hooray for small changes that satisfy niche portions of the gaming populace!
  6. Modern games are fantastic. The internet can fix broken games or give long dead titles new life. There are a myriad of benefits to the way gaming today differs from that of the past. One of the less appreciated benefits is translation and localization, which has brought western audiences a huge number of titles from Japan and vice versa. And because of that exchange of gaming, language has become critical to how many people appreciate titles. For some, there is only one "correct" language in which to enjoy certain games or sometimes a game simply sounds better to some of its players in a different language because of the different voice actors used in the localization process. That's why, despite near universal acclaim, some fans of The The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild were disappointed that its western release didn't include the Japanese language version of the game that some saw in the original trailers. Though there were no gameplay differences, some players truly preferred the way the Japanese version sounded over the English version - many attributing this difference to the quality of the voice acting. A separate camp in the community grew to similarly clamor for the Japanese version, not because they could understand the game better, but specifically because they couldn't understand the vocals. The Legend of Zelda has traditionally avoided voice acting in the series and this small subset of gamers preferred a version of the game that they could enjoy in the same way - even if the language used was real - as long as they couldn't understand and had to rely on subtitles like the older games in the series. Nintendo released a patch for Breath of the Wild today that allows players to turn on Japanese audio for their action-adventure critical darling. Players can find the option in the game's main menu after updating and switch over to Japanese, Spanish, German, or Italian. If you're worried that you will inadvertently switch over all the text, too, never fear! Switching over only affects audio. Hooray for small changes that satisfy niche portions of the gaming populace! View full article
  7. It is easy to forget that BioWare took a bold risk when they launched their untested, original IP as an Xbox 360 exclusive back in 2007. The RPG genre had never truly veered into uncharted territory with a mainstream release as with a third-person shooter hybrid. On top of that, it was set in an unknown universe that the marketing team could easily have over-inflated to generate hype only to fall victim to the backlash (remember the cautionary tale of Advent Rising?). However, what made Mass Effect special was that it actually managed to live up to the hype. It worked. It had choices that engaged players. It was full of unique and interesting piece of universe-building and memorable characters. It delivered the sci-fi adventure some people had been waiting their entire lives to see in a video game for the first time. Almost a decade later with a new entry in the franchise releasing this week, does the original Mass Effect stand as not merely a good game, but one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Mass Effect 'Uncharted Depths' by Hy Bound (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02157) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, follow the show on Twitter and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  8. It is easy to forget that BioWare took a bold risk when they launched their untested, original IP as an Xbox 360 exclusive back in 2007. The RPG genre had never truly veered into uncharted territory with a mainstream release as with a third-person shooter hybrid. On top of that, it was set in an unknown universe that the marketing team could easily have over-inflated to generate hype only to fall victim to the backlash (remember the cautionary tale of Advent Rising?). However, what made Mass Effect special was that it actually managed to live up to the hype. It worked. It had choices that engaged players. It was full of unique and interesting piece of universe-building and memorable characters. It delivered the sci-fi adventure some people had been waiting their entire lives to see in a video game for the first time. Almost a decade later with a new entry in the franchise releasing this week, does the original Mass Effect stand as not merely a good game, but one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Mass Effect 'Uncharted Depths' by Hy Bound (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02157) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, follow the show on Twitter and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  9. Nintendo isn't well known for supporting downloadable content, but it seems that things might be different with their upcoming console release. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild will be sold alongside a season pass that gives access to several expansions planned for the title. This marks the first time Nintendo has ever offered DLC for a Legend of Zelda game. The first DLC will release with Breath of the Wild alongside the Switch's launch on March 3 with a second batch following sometime during the summer and a final pack at the end of the year. The pass for the full crop of DLC will cost $19.99. The first piece will add three new treasure chests that contain "useful items" and unique clothing options for Link. The second part of the DLC will add a hard mode to the game, introduce a Cave of Trials challenge, and a "new map feature." The final DLC pack seems to be the most interesting of the three as it expands the base game with new story content, a new dungeon, and more challenges. This move is so unprecedented that Nintendo actually released a short explanatory video for those who don't know about downloadable content. This move has been a long time coming. After dipping their toes into paid DLC for the first time in 2011 with Fire Emblem: Awakening, Nintendo has very, very slowly been seeing how it can successfully incorporate downloadable content into its premier franchises. The move toward mobile gaming over the past year has been a part of their cautious experimentation. Given how pretty much all of these moves have reaped massive rewards for Nintendo, is it really that surprising that Nintendo's largest franchise would be releasing with DLC plans in place? For more Breath of the Wild goodness, be sure to check out our hands-on preview! View full article
  10. Breath of the Wild Will Have a Season Pass

    Nintendo isn't well known for supporting downloadable content, but it seems that things might be different with their upcoming console release. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild will be sold alongside a season pass that gives access to several expansions planned for the title. This marks the first time Nintendo has ever offered DLC for a Legend of Zelda game. The first DLC will release with Breath of the Wild alongside the Switch's launch on March 3 with a second batch following sometime during the summer and a final pack at the end of the year. The pass for the full crop of DLC will cost $19.99. The first piece will add three new treasure chests that contain "useful items" and unique clothing options for Link. The second part of the DLC will add a hard mode to the game, introduce a Cave of Trials challenge, and a "new map feature." The final DLC pack seems to be the most interesting of the three as it expands the base game with new story content, a new dungeon, and more challenges. This move is so unprecedented that Nintendo actually released a short explanatory video for those who don't know about downloadable content. This move has been a long time coming. After dipping their toes into paid DLC for the first time in 2011 with Fire Emblem: Awakening, Nintendo has very, very slowly been seeing how it can successfully incorporate downloadable content into its premier franchises. The move toward mobile gaming over the past year has been a part of their cautious experimentation. Given how pretty much all of these moves have reaped massive rewards for Nintendo, is it really that surprising that Nintendo's largest franchise would be releasing with DLC plans in place? For more Breath of the Wild goodness, be sure to check out our hands-on preview!
  11. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild towers as the Nintendo Switch’s most anticipated title for good reason. In addition to being a new Zelda, thus being a big deal by default, the latest entry in the long-running franchise expands on the series’ formula by featuring a vast open world for players to explore freely. After much anticipation, I had the opportunity to spend roughly 20 minutes of hands-on time with Breath of the Wild. It felt like a fraction of that time because I was completely enamored with Hyrule’s wealth of possibilities. From what I understand, the demo I played was identical to last year’s E3 demo, so the opening events are likely familiar if you’ve read impressions for that version. Link awakens within an ancient temple, beckoned by a mysterious voice. After being bestowed with the magical Sheikah Slate, a multipurpose tool that serves as Link’s map, among other functions, I found and equipped basic clothing. Breath of the Wild’s vibrant world welcomed me with open arms as I exited the structure. There was only one question: Where do I head first? I could have immediately veered off on my own path, but I opted to follow a mysterious hooded man. After catching up with him and absorbing some sage tutorial advice, I embarked on my journey. My first order of business was to climb everything. Link can scale virtually any surface, his actions dictated by a stamina meter ala Skyward Sword. The ability to climbing vastly opens up exploration options. Instead of seeking out a main path, I just scampered up cliffs and improvised my way through areas. Link’s stamina drained rather quickly in the demo to the point of becoming a mild nuisance. Hopefully, it won’t take too long to for players to build up his strength in the full release. I quickly procured my first weapon: a branch. Not quite the Master Sword, but I had to start somewhere. It was a fortunate discovery, since I immediately encountered my first adversary in a lone moblin. Combat itself felt largely identical to previous Zelda games. I slashed, rolled, and leapt in and out of engagement with my foe. The controls felt smooth and responsive as we clashed. The presence of weapon degradation was the most prominent new wrinkle, as it forced me to monitor the state of items. Unfortunately, my branch splintered into pieces before I could finish my adversary, forcing me into a hasty retreat. In an unexpected and humorous moment, the persistent moblin gave chase for several yards. It even followed me down a sheer cliff drop. Even the Nintendo representative guiding me through the demo was taken aback at the beast’s determination. After a lengthy pursuit, the moblin finally decided I wasn’t worth the effort and backed off. That wasn’t the end of my troubles. I turned to discover that I’d accidentally stumbled upon a camp teeming with moblins–and I was completely defenseless. In a stroke of intentionally designed luck, though, I noticed a bow and quiver of arrows laying by a log nearby. There were also a few more branches. Now that I had a larger arsenal, I messed around with Breath of the Wild’s inventory system. Players can quick select weapons in-game on the fly by entering a separate menu. Additionally, hot key options also streamlined selection. I adapted to this new system swiftly, swapping items with ease. Before I tackled the enemy base, my Nintendo rep instructed me to slide the Switch out of its dock and continue playing in handheld mode. The transition from big to small screen was as quick and seamless as advertised. Best of all, the performance didn’t skip a beat and looked great on the smaller display. With my new bow, I took aim and sniped distant enemies, drawing their attention. As the now-alert moblins hurtled towards me, I spotted a nearby shield and quickly equipped it. With my beat-down stick and shield ready, I fought my way through the remaining horde, rolling and collecting additional arrows and sticks mid-fight. Once the last moblin fell, I began collecting the spoils. Among the loot was an actual sword. Hooray, no more branches! That sense of improvement defined much of Breath of the Wild’s experience. Every time I nabbed a new item, I eagerly compared it stats to my existing inventory and wanted to continue searching in hopes of finding greater riches. That’s a fun and necessary incentive to achieve in an open world game. After clearing the area of its riches, I decided to continue towards the main story objective. The waypoint led to a small ruin with a plate to insert the Shiekah Slate. I placed the relic, which triggered a scene where a massive tower emerged from the Earth. Interestingly, the Nintendo Rep pointed out that during this cinematic, moblins are typically present since the structure sprouts near their base. However, since I wiped out the camp before summoning the tower, the moblins were absent. I always appreciate little touches of continuity like that. I’ll have to wait for the full release of Breath of the Wild to see what follows after that tower arose from the ruins as my demo wrapped up shortly thereafter. Although I barely scratched the surface of the tip of the iceberg, I left the demo anxious and excited to get my hands on the full experience. Roaming the open world, discovering items and locations with little to no guidance felt like playing a big-budget remake of the NES Legend of Zelda. It’s a freedom that’s been lacking in the last few console entries, and the next logical leap after A Link Between Worlds (a personal fave) began the shift towards a less linear direction. Breakable weapons largely irritate me in most games, but Zelda tempers that annoyance by sprinkling items all over the place. I was always picking up new equipment, and even though most of them were fragile branches, I had a supply of them to rely on until I found something better. Most importantly, Breath of the Wild was just plain fun. Combat works fine, the picturesque world was a joy to run around in, and the loop of exploration and loot has its hooks. If the gameplay continues to evolve in positive ways, and if they story is up to snuff, Breath of the Wild could be a Zelda game for the ages. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild launches for Switch and Wii U March 3. View full article
  12. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild towers as the Nintendo Switch’s most anticipated title for good reason. In addition to being a new Zelda, thus being a big deal by default, the latest entry in the long-running franchise expands on the series’ formula by featuring a vast open world for players to explore freely. After much anticipation, I had the opportunity to spend roughly 20 minutes of hands-on time with Breath of the Wild. It felt like a fraction of that time because I was completely enamored with Hyrule’s wealth of possibilities. From what I understand, the demo I played was identical to last year’s E3 demo, so the opening events are likely familiar if you’ve read impressions for that version. Link awakens within an ancient temple, beckoned by a mysterious voice. After being bestowed with the magical Sheikah Slate, a multipurpose tool that serves as Link’s map, among other functions, I found and equipped basic clothing. Breath of the Wild’s vibrant world welcomed me with open arms as I exited the structure. There was only one question: Where do I head first? I could have immediately veered off on my own path, but I opted to follow a mysterious hooded man. After catching up with him and absorbing some sage tutorial advice, I embarked on my journey. My first order of business was to climb everything. Link can scale virtually any surface, his actions dictated by a stamina meter ala Skyward Sword. The ability to climbing vastly opens up exploration options. Instead of seeking out a main path, I just scampered up cliffs and improvised my way through areas. Link’s stamina drained rather quickly in the demo to the point of becoming a mild nuisance. Hopefully, it won’t take too long to for players to build up his strength in the full release. I quickly procured my first weapon: a branch. Not quite the Master Sword, but I had to start somewhere. It was a fortunate discovery, since I immediately encountered my first adversary in a lone moblin. Combat itself felt largely identical to previous Zelda games. I slashed, rolled, and leapt in and out of engagement with my foe. The controls felt smooth and responsive as we clashed. The presence of weapon degradation was the most prominent new wrinkle, as it forced me to monitor the state of items. Unfortunately, my branch splintered into pieces before I could finish my adversary, forcing me into a hasty retreat. In an unexpected and humorous moment, the persistent moblin gave chase for several yards. It even followed me down a sheer cliff drop. Even the Nintendo representative guiding me through the demo was taken aback at the beast’s determination. After a lengthy pursuit, the moblin finally decided I wasn’t worth the effort and backed off. That wasn’t the end of my troubles. I turned to discover that I’d accidentally stumbled upon a camp teeming with moblins–and I was completely defenseless. In a stroke of intentionally designed luck, though, I noticed a bow and quiver of arrows laying by a log nearby. There were also a few more branches. Now that I had a larger arsenal, I messed around with Breath of the Wild’s inventory system. Players can quick select weapons in-game on the fly by entering a separate menu. Additionally, hot key options also streamlined selection. I adapted to this new system swiftly, swapping items with ease. Before I tackled the enemy base, my Nintendo rep instructed me to slide the Switch out of its dock and continue playing in handheld mode. The transition from big to small screen was as quick and seamless as advertised. Best of all, the performance didn’t skip a beat and looked great on the smaller display. With my new bow, I took aim and sniped distant enemies, drawing their attention. As the now-alert moblins hurtled towards me, I spotted a nearby shield and quickly equipped it. With my beat-down stick and shield ready, I fought my way through the remaining horde, rolling and collecting additional arrows and sticks mid-fight. Once the last moblin fell, I began collecting the spoils. Among the loot was an actual sword. Hooray, no more branches! That sense of improvement defined much of Breath of the Wild’s experience. Every time I nabbed a new item, I eagerly compared it stats to my existing inventory and wanted to continue searching in hopes of finding greater riches. That’s a fun and necessary incentive to achieve in an open world game. After clearing the area of its riches, I decided to continue towards the main story objective. The waypoint led to a small ruin with a plate to insert the Shiekah Slate. I placed the relic, which triggered a scene where a massive tower emerged from the Earth. Interestingly, the Nintendo Rep pointed out that during this cinematic, moblins are typically present since the structure sprouts near their base. However, since I wiped out the camp before summoning the tower, the moblins were absent. I always appreciate little touches of continuity like that. I’ll have to wait for the full release of Breath of the Wild to see what follows after that tower arose from the ruins as my demo wrapped up shortly thereafter. Although I barely scratched the surface of the tip of the iceberg, I left the demo anxious and excited to get my hands on the full experience. Roaming the open world, discovering items and locations with little to no guidance felt like playing a big-budget remake of the NES Legend of Zelda. It’s a freedom that’s been lacking in the last few console entries, and the next logical leap after A Link Between Worlds (a personal fave) began the shift towards a less linear direction. Breakable weapons largely irritate me in most games, but Zelda tempers that annoyance by sprinkling items all over the place. I was always picking up new equipment, and even though most of them were fragile branches, I had a supply of them to rely on until I found something better. Most importantly, Breath of the Wild was just plain fun. Combat works fine, the picturesque world was a joy to run around in, and the loop of exploration and loot has its hooks. If the gameplay continues to evolve in positive ways, and if they story is up to snuff, Breath of the Wild could be a Zelda game for the ages. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild launches for Switch and Wii U March 3.
  13. It turns out that Super Smash Bros. Wii U will be hitting store shelves before the holidays after all. Nintendo has set aside November 21 as the day when all Wii U owners fall victim to "Smash" sickness. The first wave of Amiibo figures, consisting of Mario, Peach, Yoshi, Donkey Kong, Link, Fox, Samus, Wii Fit Trainer, Villager, Pikachu, Kirby, and Marth, will arrive on the same day. There will be a second wave of figures releasing later in the month that will include Zelda, Diddy Kong, Luigi, Pit, Captain Falcon, and Little Mac. Nintendo has also announced that a Wii U compatible GameCube controller ($29.99) will launch alongside Super Smash Bros. Wii U. There will also be a bundle that include Super Smash Bros. Wii U, the GameCube controller, and an adapter that allows players to use their original GameCube controllers ($99.99). The adapter will be sold separately for $19.99.
  14. Pier Solar and the Great Architects, the HD remake of 2010 original that was exclusive to the Sega Mega Drive, is due on September 30th for PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Ouya, and PC. Pier Solar HD is a direct result of a successful Kickstarter campaign that ran back in 2012. In addition to a release on PS4, PS3, and PC, WaterMelon will also be releasing the RPG on Xbox One, Wii U, and Sega Dreamcast, though the release dates of those versions will be announced next month after they've received certification. I'm gonna be honest, I've been looking forward to playing Pier Solar HD for a long time. Never having had a Sega Mega Drive, I wasn't able to play the original retro release of Pier Solar which made me sad as a big fan of classic RPGs. This news really makes me happy!
  15. Not much is known at this point about the futuristic racing game, but Shin'en Multimedia promises more details next week. 1st screenshot from "FAST Racing Neo" - our upcoming Wii U futuristic racer. More to come next week. pic.twitter.com/jVDApxk22r — Shin'en Multimedia (@ShinenGames) September 16, 2014 Also, here is a .gif I was able to dig up from FAST Racing Neo's initial announcement last year.
  16. During E3 I had the pleasure of meeting with Martin Brouard from Frima Studios to discuss the indie platforming title Chariot. Afterward, I was able to go hands-on for nearly a half-hour. Spoiler: I couldn't stop smiling. --- Martin Brouard: I’m the Executive Producer for Chariot. It’s a platformer, a couch co-op platformer that’s coming out on Xbox One, PS4, Wii U, and PC this fall. Jack Gardner: Awesome! And we can see it right behind you there. From what I understand the general premise is that a king or emperor has died and you're taking him to his final resting place? MB: Right, you play as a princess and you are accompanied by your very trusty fiancé and before going on with your life, you have to, you know, put your dead father to rest in a really nice sepulcher. But the king is actually back as a ghost and the chariot that you are bringing around everywhere; it’s a coffin on wheels. The king is there and he keeps complaining that you are leaving treasure behind or that you cannot possibly think of burying him here because it is not a proper, kingly place. He always wants more treasure and more interesting places, so that’s how you progress through different levels. [There are] five different environments, 25 levels of exploration. And it is couch co-op so you play both characters. You can play solo, but it is really made for having fun with a friend at home. JG: What different mechanics can we expect to see out of Chariot? MB: The big difference between Chariot and other platformers that we know and love is that it’s a physics-based platformer with a chariot is at the center of it. You need the chariot because that’s what picks up all the loot; that’s what is at the center of the game. So, you’ll push it; you’ll pull it; you’ll use this rope mechanic to pull the chariot, to give some rope to your friend to dangle over a precipice. To try to jump into hard to reach areas. There is lots of exploration. You use the chariot to jump on it, to roll down slopes. [You will have] one special item that you choose for every level, one per character, you use these items to do special moves. There is an attractor, a repulsor, a peg so you can attach your rope to a little escalation peg. There’s something that slows down time and speed boots. By combining these items, one on each character, you can pull off some really fantastic moves and that’s where the fun is. JG: And there is no online co-op or just couch co-op? MB: It’s too… it just wouldn’t make sense for us. It’s really a game where you want to have fun with the person sitting next to you. And be arguing over, “We should be going over there,” “No! Let’s go over there. There is probably something hidden there,” “Alright, alright.” It just wouldn’t be the same over the internet. JG: What is your favorite part of Chariot? MB: My favorite part is definitely when you see some hard to reach area and you’re like, “Okay, we’ve got to get over there,” and you need to figure out a way, but there are different ways to achieve that. Sometimes you’ll try to pull out some really crazy move, and you will try and try again. When after fifteen minutes of trying you finally pull off that move, this is just so satisfying. High-fives all over the place and it is a great satisfaction. Also, the humor. Right now this is an alpha-build. It’s not finished. JG: Wow, that looks great for an alpha-build! MB: Thank you! But the voice overs aren’t implemented yet. There is a lot of humor coming from the king who is interacting with you. He is kinda acting as a chaperone, you know, his daughter with this guy. He’s there to keep an eye on you and make sure you don’t leave any loot on the table. JG: And collecting the loot is how you unlock the gadgets and get the different abilities? MB: You actually get the gadgets by finding the blueprints and special collectibles. Between every level you’ll be meeting with a merchant on the surface. He’s a skeleton dude, I don’t think he even realizes that he’s a skeleton, but he’s improving your stuff in exchange for your loot. For example, if you want to go to the lava levels, you’ll need to make sure that your chariot becomes fireproof. For that you’ll need to find blueprints that are hidden somewhere in the game, but then you also need to give the blueprints to the merchant along with some of your loot, which the king doesn’t like too much. When you part with the blueprint and [pay the merchant], he’ll upgrade the chariot and it will be able to float in lava. Same thing with the ice caverns and other levels. You can also improve your gadgets up to three levels. For example, the repulsor which is basically something that throws the chariot super hard with physics, when you are at level three it really shoots the chariot very far. So, if your friend is standing on it and then you’re shooting it, it’s pretty awesome. JG: Are there enemies in the game? So far I haven’t seen any. MB: Well, it’s not a fighting game, but there are enemies. They're called looters. They will not attack you. They will only attack the chariot, try to grab your loot, and run away with it. So your job is basically to dispatch them as quickly as possible or run away before they steal too much of your loot, because that’s also your score. The princess has a sword, so she’s a close-range character and the fiancé has a little slingshot so he is a ranged character. A lot of times, one player will try to get out while the other will defend, so that leads to some fun little combat scenes, but it’s not at the heart of the game. There are four different enemies. Some of them are even trying to steal the chariot! [laughs] JG: Is it an open-world, Metroid-style game? MB: No, no. The way it works is there are 25 different levels scattered over five different environments. These environments are unlocked when you upgrade the chariot, but there are different entrances and exits in certain levels that sometimes unlock speed runs you can complete for special rewards and leaderboards. JG: So how does that work, is there a hub where you access each level? MB: Yes, there is a map that is currently very placeholder, but every time you find an exit it opens up the path to a new level. Sometimes you find different exits in different levels. There is a lot of exploration there. JG: Well it looks incredible. I can’t wait to play it! MB: Thank you very much, you can play it right now! [laughs] --- And play it I did. Even in early alpha Chariot is almost overwhelmingly charming. The art design is great and does a great job conveying humor and lightheartedness even without dialogue. Levels are cleverly constructed to interact with the chariot and the players in interesting ways. For example, there are certain surfaces that will be solid for the player, but not the chariot and vice versa. The rope mechanics and physics feel statisfying and it feels really rewarding to overcome obstacles with a co-op partner. Recently there have been people expressing a desire for non-violent games to play with family or just as an alternative to the omni-present shooter genre. Though Brouard said that there were looters in Chariot, in nearly a half hour, I never saw a single one and still enjoyed myself immensely. I would feel very comfortable sitting down with my young nephews and playing this along with them. Brouard was right, Chariot can be played alone, but it is meant to embody cooperation and going it alone seems miss a bit of the magic that Chariot has to offer. Keep your eye on Chariot. It releases this fall on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Wii U, and PC.
  17. E3 2014 - Nintendo's Press Conference

    Nintendo came out swinging this E3. It turns out when you develop most of the games for your own video game system you can hoard information about your first party games and then reveal them all at once. Nintendo seems to have learned a bit from its first digital press conference in 2013. This year, viewers were treated to amusing Robot Chicken claymation skits breaking up the gaming new (but not for overly long). After introductions, Nintendo introduced something called Amiibo; small figures which appear to be similar to the toys of Disney Infinity or Skylanders figures. These figures will be used first with Super Smash Bros. Wii U. Amiibo figures can be read with the Wii U gamepad and scanned into the game. There is two-way data sharing between the Wii U and Amiibo figures. In Super Smash Bros. Wii U, data in the figure becomes personalized over time, which means that the figures learn and get stronger the more they are used in-game. They can also learn new moves and level up. Next year a peripheral will be released that allows Amiibo figures to be read into the 3DS. Following the push to sell Amiibo figures, the digital event switched over to a yarn shop. Yes. You read that right. Yoshi’s Woolly World is a soft, friendly platformer starring everyone’s favorite Mario Bros. dinosaur. As the name suggests, the art style is fully committed to wool yarn and a handmade feel. According to Woolly World’s creative director, they want the game to constantly surprise and bring a smile to the face of their players. Yoshi’s Woolly World is coming in 2015. Who do audiences recognize from the Super Mario Bros. series that isn’t Yoshi, Bowser, Peach, Luigi, or Mario? Toad! Nintendo knows that Toad has never been front and center in his very own game… until now. Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker is a puzzle platformer that makes use of the Wii U gamepad. Players will be tasked with guiding Captain Toad through various stages to retrieve a star at the end of each. Then, Nintendo dropped its bombs. There is a new Legend of Zelda game coming to Wii U. That news itself isn’t entirely unexpected, but perhaps we all need to readjust our expectations a bit. I know that I wasn’t expecting to get blown away by the reveal, but I just about pooped my pants when I saw how gorgeous the game was. The brief glimpse of the game in action showed a figure on a horse who many assumed was Link (though later there was a comment by the series’ producer that cast some doubt on that assumption). Though we don’t know much about it, what tidbits we saw were really exciting. Initially we were shown a beautiful vista; then we were told that the vista was an entirely explorable. Yep, the next Legend of Zelda is going to be an open world. That has laser arrows. And weird magic robots. It will be released next year. Knowing that they couldn’t possibly top their previous announcement, Nintendo let everyone cool off with a friendly reminder that Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire will release on November 21. Bayonetta 2 was next on Nintendo’s announcement list. Releasing this October, Bayonetta 2 will come packaged with the first Bayonetta and different outfits based on various Nintendo characters. Speaking of characters, Nintendo announced that Hyrule Warriors will release September 26 and will feature a huge roster of playable characters that includes Link, Zelda, Impa, Midna, and the promise that “you’ll be able to play as your favorite Legend of Zelda character.” Also announced was Kirby and the Rainbow Curse, which looks like a cross between Kirby’s Epic Yarn and Kirby Canvas Curse. Players use the Wii U gamepad to draw a pathway for the ball-ified Kirby to make his way through various levels and defeat any enemies. The Monolithsoft’s logo came up on-screen. Afterward, gorgeous, sweeping CGI sequences heralded a new big budget JRPG. Xenoblade Chronicles X looks like another stab at the next great sweeping space opera and I am totally on board to see where this craziness leads. Next up was Mario Maker, which is possibly one of the most self-explanatory games in history. Mario Maker gives players the ability to create their own Mario levels and share them with friends. Level creators will have the ability to switch between original Super Mario Bros. and New Super Mario Bros. graphic styles. Expect to see this title sometime in 2015. Leave it to Nintendo to ask the one question no one has ever asked themselves: “What if you could shoot ink and turn into a squid?” That was the driving idea behind Splatoon, a third-person paintball shooter that allows players to transform into squids and traverse arenas by flowing through their own ink. Splatoon releases in 2015. The digital press conference concluded with the reveal of the goddess Lady Palutena from Kid Icarus as a playable character in the new Super Smash Bros. The disclosure came in the form of an animated sequence courtesy of the Shaft animation studio; perhaps that means we will be seeing a Super Smash Bros. anime? Make it so, Nintendo. Overall, this was a fantastic press conference from Nintendo. They unveiled games that I’m excited for and want to play. Unfortunately, many of the most interesting games shown were still a year or more out. That’s a long wait no matter how you slice it. Hopefully Super Smash Bros. and the possibility of some third-party titles can tide Wii U owners over until the promises of this E3 come to pass. What did you think of the conference? Good? Adequate? Meh?
  18. Activision Announces Skylanders Trap Team

    The latest Skylanders installment introduces new characters, toys, and a whole new portal for capturing the bad guys. Skylanders Trap Team expands on the previous Skylander entries by introducing powerful new enemies known as Traps. These are the most villainous baddies around, but once they are defeated and trapped using the new Traptanium Portal, they can be called upon in-game as new playable characters. Also, once trapped, these villains will lend their voices to the toy in which they have been captured. Eric Hirshberg, CEO of Activision Publishing said in an announcement that, “with Skylanders Trap Team, we’re no longer just letting kids bring their toys to life inside the game anymore. This time, we’re letting them pull their toys out of the game as well." Trap Team can be pre-ordered from now until its release on October 2 for PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Wii, Wii U, Xbox 360, and Xbox One. There will also be an entirely different adventure available on 3DS.
  19. Yesterday, in a nearly hour long Nintendo Direct broadcast, Nintendo divulged many new tidbits of information on the upcoming fighting title coming to 3DS and Wii U. One of the biggest bombshells came at the beginning of the broadcast. Unlike what many people assumed, the two games will not be launching simultaneously. The 3DS version of Super Smash Bros. will be released this summer, while the Wii U version will be released sometime this winter. I'd be willing to bet good (none of that filthy bad money) money that gamers can expect the Wii U version to launch close to the holidays. For anyone worried about the technical performance of the 3DS version of Smash Bros., worry no more. It was confirmed that all fighters will run in 60 frames per second, even while 3D viewing is enabled. The summoned creatures from items like assist trophies will run in 30 FPS, but every player character will move in 60 FPS regardless of what else is happening on screen. There will also be substantial differences between the two versions. While both the 3DS and Wii U will have the same roster of fighters, they will have separate stages. Even stages of the same name in both will be tweaked and have different layouts in the two games. While the Wii U version will have a music player similar to the one found in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, the 3DS will be limited to two songs per stage. There will be some kind of connectivity between the 3DS and Wii U versions, but what form that will take and how extensive it will be remains to be seen. More details should roll out around E3. The online multiplayer was revealed as well. Players will now be able to choose from two game modes: For Fun or For Glory. For Fun allows players to be put into games with random stages, all items on, with smash battles, and only wins are recorded. For Glory takes place on Final Destination, no items, 1v1 battle are possible, and both wins and losses are recorded. Of course, when playing with friends over the internet, players will be able to customize their settings to whatever they desire. Also, Final Destination has received an upgrade. Almost every stage now has a Final Destination form, giving more visual variety to one of the most iconic Super Smash Bros. arenas. Instead of having an online ranking system, players will accumulate Global Smash Power, which can be used to brag show your friends how good of a smasher you are. Nintendo insists that GSP will not be what matches you up against opponents, the stat tracker for that will be hidden. New fighters were also confirmed and shown off in great detail: Mega Man, Little Mac, Rosalina, Animal Crossing Villager, and Wii Fit Trainer. Characters that previously had multiple forms will now have a single form and move set. Meaning Samus, Zero Suit Samus, Sheik, and Zelda are now separate, playable characters. After the presentation concluded, the Pokémon Greninja was also revealed to be joining the cast. Finally, the 3DS version was shown to have a unique game mode called Smash Run. Players are thrown into a random dungeon full of monsters and pitfalls where they need to collect various stat-boosting power-ups within a five-minute time frame. After those 5 minutes are up, players are thrust into a battle against each other where they must make the best of the stats they accumulated in the dungeon. Overall, Super Smash Bros. 3DS and Wii U are looking to be entertaining next-gen evolutions of one of the most popular fighting game series of all time. If you have the time, you can watch the Nintendo Direct for yourself below.
  20. Hyper Light Drifter Deatiled

    Indie developer Heart Machine's foray into a world of pixels and adventure is aiming to be more than the sum of its parts. At fist glance, Hyper Light Drifter appears to be a pixelated, stylish take on the classic Zelda formula that's been a go-to template for game designers for decades. However, Heart Machine hopes to differentiate itself by implementing some of its own concepts, like a narrative expressed through visual design and an atmosphere conveyed by a canny soundtrack. From what we've seen of the development so far, Heart Machine seems to be on the right track. The approach to combat centers on the idea that the player should feel empowered when stepping onto the battlefield. Fighting should feel like it has weight with strong visual and audio cues resonating throughout a combat scenario. While conflicts should be fast, brutal affairs, Hyper Light Drifter is also attempting to satisfy its audience on a tactical level. There are many different enemy types that behave differently on the battlefield. Some adversaries will dodge or deflect attacks, others will attack en masse, and others will command legions of weaker creatures. In one of my favorite developer statements, Heart Machine had this to say regarding their game's emphasis on visual narrative, "We chose to recognize that gamers are smart." Hyper Light Drifter eschews text blocks, heavy handed exposition, and confusing UI in favor of a sleek, less-is-more approach. The idea is that the player should be immersed in the world and not be continually called out of it to consult maps and decipher their stats screen. Quests and dialogue will be conveyed in storyboard-like sequences that use color and music to effectively convey their meaning across language barriers. The soundtrack of Hyper Light Drifter is being handled by Disasterpeace, the artist behind the soundscapes of Fez and Runner2. The sound will work together with the visuals to create a mounting aura of anxiety as players venture deeper into the ravaged world of ancient technology better left forgotten. Hyper Light Drifter has come a long way from its hugely successful Kickstarter campaign last year. We can barely wait to get out hands on Heart Machine's creation and delve into the secrets of the future-past. Hyper Light Drifter is slated to release later this year on PC, Mac, Linux, PlayStation 4, Vita, and Wii U.
  21. To kick off the launch of Skylanders Swap Force on October 13, Activision Blizzard is turning the month of October into a celebration of the popular figurine/video game franchise. Beginning October 1 and continuing through the 31, Activision will be giving away a Starter Pack of collectible toys each day through the Skylanders twitter channel (@SkylandersGames). To be eligible for those giveaways, hop over to Skylanders.com, experiment with your favorite combinations of characters, and then tweet your preferred arrangement with a catchphrase and the hashtags #SWAPtober and #Skylanders. October 10 kicks off the official SWAPtoberfest in New York City's Times Square. In addition to giving gamers a chance to play the game earlier than just about everyone else, the event will feature photo opportunities with characters from the game and opportunities to get swag ranging from Starter Packs to Skylanders-themed merchandise from MEGA Brands, Rubie's Costume Company, Hybrid Apparel and Power A. Skylanders SWAP Force will release October 13 on Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii, Wii U, and 3DS on October 13. It also will be available day-and-date with the launch of PlayStation 4 on November 15 and Xbox One on November 22.
  22. Nintendo Direct 8/7/13 Recap

    Sonic, Rayman, Luigi, Pokémon, Professor Layton, and Zelda, for your quick stop on what was covered during yesterday’s Nintendo Direct, look no further! We’ve got you covered. Satoru Iwata, global president of Nintendo, began the proceedings by digging into the upcoming Sonic Lost World. The Wii U title will feature three speeds, accommodating players of all skill levels and adding a greater degree of control over the blue hedgehog. Iwata also revealed that Sonic will be able to use “color powers” giving sonic different abilities like tunneling through dirt or transforming into a bird-creature. A 3DS version of the title will also be available. Players will be able to link a 3DS copy of Lost World with a Wii U version, importing player-created radio-controlled vehicles, which they can control on the Wii U using their 3DS. This effectively means that two friends who own the 3DS and Wii U versions can play co-operatively on the Wii U version. Sonic Lost World will release October 22. Iwata moved on to discuss Rayman Legends, which was supposed to release at the beginning of this summer, but was pushed back to the beginning of fall to release across all platforms besides the Wii U. Basically, this section of the Direct was to say, “Hey, remember how cool this game looked several months ago? It is still coming out and it still has unique Wii U GamePad functionality!” So, to reiterate, up to five players can cooperate to beat the various levels, four players on controllers and one on the GamePad. The GamePad player will have access to unique ways to influence the game world unavailable to other players. The only bit of real information was that there will be downloadable Mario and Luigi costumes for the Wii U version. Rayman Legends releases September 3 The Direct then spent some time on Ark Academy SketchPad, a downloadable software program from the eShop that will allow users to use the Wii U GamePad to create artwork. Users will be able to take screenshots of their art and share it with other users via Nintendo’s online services. Though Ark Academy launches August 9, community support will be available a few days later. Iwata also mentioned briefly that Nintendo is working on another Ark Academy title that will include detailed drawing lessons. Following the announcement regarding Ark Academy, Erik Peterson from the Treehouse division of Nintendo of America came on to discuss North American releases of Nintendo titles. Peterson kicked things off with a reminder that Pikmin 3 released and has a way of taking in-game screenshots with the GamePad controller. Players can then caption and share these pictures. If this doesn’t sound like a recipe for the kind of mischief that Nintendo has notoriously cracked down upon, I don’t know what does. Peterson also made sure to remind everyone that the Mario and Luigi Dream Team will be released on August 11 for the 3DS. Pokémon Rumble U was revealed and discussed shortly after Peterson gave an overview of Dream Team. The Wii U eShop title features frantic toy Pokémon vs. toy Pokémon action over the course of 70 levels. Following each level players will have a chance of befriending the Pokémon defeated in battle. All 649 Pokémon that have appeared through Black version 2 and White version 2 will be present and playable. Players will be able to buy figurines at participating retailers and transport them into the game via a scanner on the Wii U GamePad, similar to the popular Skylanders series. Peterson assured everyone that these figurines are completely optional and will not be necessary to see everything. Pokémon Rumble U hits the digital shelves August 29. Other downloadable titles are heading to the 3DS eShop. Retro classics like the original Donkey Kong (August 15), Tecmo Bowl (sometime before football season starts), Wario Land 3 (August 29), and Super Mario Bros. 3 (later this year) will be making their way to the eShop over the course of this year. While Peterson wasn’t able to reveal much information, he did confirm that Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy will be coming next year as well as the long awaited Professor Layton vs. Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney. Satoru Iwata took over the briefing once again. This time, he was dropping some interesting new tidbits regarding The Legend of Zelda series. He began by pointing out that the logo for The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds had not one, but two triforces, one that we are familiar with and another that appears as a shadow. He hinted that this shadow triforce might play a large role in A Link Between Worlds. Iwata also went into a bit more detail about how The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past and A Link Between Worlds are related. A Link Between Worlds takes place far in the future, many years after A Link to the Past. The main character is not the same Link, but an entirely new Link. While the normal world of A Link Between Worlds is the same as A Link to the Past, the “other” world seen in the trailers and gameplay from A Link Between Worlds, might not be the Dark World from A Link to the Past. A bit confusing, I know, but whatever the Zelda continuity, A Link Between Worlds is coming to 3DS this November. Iwata also discussed a few of the changes Nintendo has included in the HD version of The Legend of Zelda: The Windwaker. The team has fine-tuned the collection in the last half of the game, presumably making it a bit easier and including less backtracking. They’ve also adjusted wind control actions, which can now be adjusted in any direction instead of fumbling repeatedly with that dang wind baton when you get the direction wrong. Finally, they added a high-speed sailing mode to alleviate some of the tedium players experienced sailing the long stretches of empty ocean. Windwaker HD will be available this October. Luigi was also confirmed for the Wii U and 3DS Super Smash Bros. titles, which doesn’t come as much of a surprise, but I suppose it is nice to know nonetheless. Following the success of Animal Crossing: New Leaf, Iwata announced a new Animal Crossing community on Wii U and a downloadable Animal Crossing Plaza for the Wii U. Animal Crossing Plaza allows players to share screenshots with other players, send messages, see residents from other towns, share clothing designs, post about specific animals, and see updates from your 3DS town. You can download the Plaza now on Wii U. Finally, Iwata concluded yesterday’s Nintendo Direct by announcing that the Platinum Games title Wonderful 101 will be receiving its own Nintendo Direct this Friday August 9, 7 AM PT. As always, you can view the latest Nintendo Direct for yourself. What do you guys think? Interested in a Wii U or 3DS? Is Nintendo doing what it needs to in order to succeed? Let us know in the comments!
  23. Adventure Time: Explore the Dungeon Because I DON’T KNOW! is the follow-up to last year’s Adventure Time: Hey Ice King! Why’d You Steal Our Garbage?!! (both of which are serious contenders for the longest, silliest video game name award). In Explore the Dungeon, players are tasked with saving the Candy Kingdom by exploring the 100 floors of the mysterious Secret Royal Dungeon. Players can choose between multiple characters including Finn, Jake, Marceline, Cinnamon Bun, and more. If you think that 100 floors might be a bit much by yourself, fear not! You’ll be able to team up with up to three friends for some co-op multiplayer. As you progress through each level, you’ll acquire Tokens, which you can equip to improve your character’s abilities as well as Sub-Weapons to deal out more damage to your enemies. Series creator Pendleton Ward teamed up with developer WayForward to create a specifically video game-oriented story to preserve a distinctly Adventure Time-y feel. Along with Ward, the original voices from the show are all signed on to bring their dulcet tones to the game. Adventure Time: Explore the Dungeon Because I DON’T KNOW! is coming this Fall to Wii U, 3DS, Xbox 360, and PS3.
  24. Nintendo announced during their live stream this morning that they have finally given a name to their newest Legend of Zelda game. Now known as The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, and its has a brand new trailer highlighting the game's expansive world. Breath of the Wild is expected to release in Spring 2017 for the Wii U and NX. Nintendo is streaming all day, so stay tuned for more updates! View full article
  25. Nintendo announced during their live stream this morning that they have finally given a name to their newest Legend of Zelda game. Now known as The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, and its has a brand new trailer highlighting the game's expansive world. Breath of the Wild is expected to release in Spring 2017 for the Wii U and NX. Nintendo is streaming all day, so stay tuned for more updates!