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Found 50 results

  1. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild received its second expansion today in the form of The Champions' Ballad. The DLC pack comes with a wide variety of additions to the core Breath of the Wild experience. Here's what to expect if you're thinking of dropping some money on the expansion: A new dungeon and additional shrines The One-Hit Obliterator, a new weapon The Master Cycle Zero, a snazzy motorcycle A questline that has Link aiding Kass the Bard to find the final pieces of a lost song Nine additional treasure chests that hold different armors and outfits Horse armor Players will have to free all of the Divine Beasts in order to unlock the Master Cycle Zero to allow Link to rip-roar his way across the wilderness. The accordion playing bird, Kass, hopes to reconstruct his master's last song, setting Link off on a quest to find the missing verses. The completed song provides new information about the history of Breath of the Wild's heroes, Revali, Mipha, Daruk, and Urbosa, as well as Princess Zelda. Like with Link's new motorcycle, Kass' quest only opens up once the Divine Beasts are freed. The treasure chests hidden across the world add in things like the Island Lobster Shirt from The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, the helmet of Zant, Ravio's hood, and Phantom Ganon's armor. These chests can also contain the ancient bridle and saddle for Link's trusty steed. In addition to looking neat, the bridle allows the horse to be spurred more times and the ancient saddle will somehow help the horse to hear the player's calls from farther away. The expansion is already out in the wild, so if the features appeal to you, pick it up for the Nintendo Wii U or Switch. View full article
  2. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild received its second expansion today in the form of The Champions' Ballad. The DLC pack comes with a wide variety of additions to the core Breath of the Wild experience. Here's what to expect if you're thinking of dropping some money on the expansion: A new dungeon and additional shrines The One-Hit Obliterator, a new weapon The Master Cycle Zero, a snazzy motorcycle A questline that has Link aiding Kass the Bard to find the final pieces of a lost song Nine additional treasure chests that hold different armors and outfits Horse armor Players will have to free all of the Divine Beasts in order to unlock the Master Cycle Zero to allow Link to rip-roar his way across the wilderness. The accordion playing bird, Kass, hopes to reconstruct his master's last song, setting Link off on a quest to find the missing verses. The completed song provides new information about the history of Breath of the Wild's heroes, Revali, Mipha, Daruk, and Urbosa, as well as Princess Zelda. Like with Link's new motorcycle, Kass' quest only opens up once the Divine Beasts are freed. The treasure chests hidden across the world add in things like the Island Lobster Shirt from The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, the helmet of Zant, Ravio's hood, and Phantom Ganon's armor. These chests can also contain the ancient bridle and saddle for Link's trusty steed. In addition to looking neat, the bridle allows the horse to be spurred more times and the ancient saddle will somehow help the horse to hear the player's calls from farther away. The expansion is already out in the wild, so if the features appeal to you, pick it up for the Nintendo Wii U or Switch.
  3. It looks like the time has come to shut off the lights on some of Nintendo's older services. Nintendo has announced that they will be discontinuing Nintendo TVii, Wii U Chat, and Miiverse on November 7th 10pm PT. All functions associated with Miiverse on Wii U, 3DS, PC, or smart phones will cease to function across all titles. For example, the messages left in New Super Mario Bros. U or WaraWara Plaza will no longer be shown. A workaround is planned for Super Mario Maker that will allow players to continue uploading courses. After November 7th, players attempting to access these services on Wii U or 3DS will receive error codes. If you're left scratching your head regarding Nintendo TVii - the service was discontinued in North America two years ago, but continued to operate in Japan. If you have made some awesome memories that you want to share, Nintendo is offering a limited window of time during which people can download their post history to PC. You can make a request by visiting this page and clicking the "Request Post History" button at the bottom. Nintendo released more information about this process: By making this request, you will be able to download your posts – plus any screenshots saved to your album – to your PC after the Miiverse service has ended. To use this download service, you will need to have a Nintendo Account linked with your Nintendo Network ID, and must make the download request before the Miiverse service ends. [...] From all of us at Nintendo, we sincerely thank you for supporting Miiverse all these years. We hope you’ll continue using Miiverse until the service ends. If you make your request, you will receive an email when the service closes down that includes a download link containing gall of your posts and screenshots. Unfortunately, this will not include any comments made on your posts, messages sent to and from friends, deleted messages, or anything that violated the Miiverse Code of Conduct. View full article
  4. Say Farewell to Miiverse

    It looks like the time has come to shut off the lights on some of Nintendo's older services. Nintendo has announced that they will be discontinuing Nintendo TVii, Wii U Chat, and Miiverse on November 7th 10pm PT. All functions associated with Miiverse on Wii U, 3DS, PC, or smart phones will cease to function across all titles. For example, the messages left in New Super Mario Bros. U or WaraWara Plaza will no longer be shown. A workaround is planned for Super Mario Maker that will allow players to continue uploading courses. After November 7th, players attempting to access these services on Wii U or 3DS will receive error codes. If you're left scratching your head regarding Nintendo TVii - the service was discontinued in North America two years ago, but continued to operate in Japan. If you have made some awesome memories that you want to share, Nintendo is offering a limited window of time during which people can download their post history to PC. You can make a request by visiting this page and clicking the "Request Post History" button at the bottom. Nintendo released more information about this process: By making this request, you will be able to download your posts – plus any screenshots saved to your album – to your PC after the Miiverse service has ended. To use this download service, you will need to have a Nintendo Account linked with your Nintendo Network ID, and must make the download request before the Miiverse service ends. [...] From all of us at Nintendo, we sincerely thank you for supporting Miiverse all these years. We hope you’ll continue using Miiverse until the service ends. If you make your request, you will receive an email when the service closes down that includes a download link containing gall of your posts and screenshots. Unfortunately, this will not include any comments made on your posts, messages sent to and from friends, deleted messages, or anything that violated the Miiverse Code of Conduct.
  5. BioWare has created some of the most beloved moments in gaming history. The Mass Effect series stands as one of the greatest gaming trilogies of all time. However, many people point toward the conclusion of Mass Effect 3 as something that undid all of the goodwill the series had fostered up until that point. For all of their talent, BioWare also created one of the single most divisive and negatively received moments in gaming history. In Part One of our Mass Effect 3 discussion, we talked about the larger game leading up to the final minutes that threw the Mass Effect fan base into chaos. Part Two covers the ending and touches on some aspects of the DLC. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Myst III: Exile 'American Wheels of Wonder' by Mazedude (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01749) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  6. BioWare has created some of the most beloved moments in gaming history. The Mass Effect series stands as one of the greatest gaming trilogies of all time. However, many people point toward the conclusion of Mass Effect 3 as something that undid all of the goodwill the series had fostered up until that point. For all of their talent, BioWare also created one of the single most divisive and negatively received moments in gaming history. In Part One of our Mass Effect 3 discussion, we talked about the larger game leading up to the final minutes that threw the Mass Effect fan base into chaos. Part Two covers the ending and touches on some aspects of the DLC. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Myst III: Exile 'American Wheels of Wonder' by Mazedude (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR01749) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  7. Modern games are fantastic. The internet can fix broken games or give long dead titles new life. There are a myriad of benefits to the way gaming today differs from that of the past. One of the less appreciated benefits is translation and localization, which has brought western audiences a huge number of titles from Japan and vice versa. And because of that exchange of gaming, language has become critical to how many people appreciate titles. For some, there is only one "correct" language in which to enjoy certain games or sometimes a game simply sounds better to some of its players in a different language because of the different voice actors used in the localization process. That's why, despite near universal acclaim, some fans of The The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild were disappointed that its western release didn't include the Japanese language version of the game that some saw in the original trailers. Though there were no gameplay differences, some players truly preferred the way the Japanese version sounded over the English version - many attributing this difference to the quality of the voice acting. A separate camp in the community grew to similarly clamor for the Japanese version, not because they could understand the game better, but specifically because they couldn't understand the vocals. The Legend of Zelda has traditionally avoided voice acting in the series and this small subset of gamers preferred a version of the game that they could enjoy in the same way - even if the language used was real - as long as they couldn't understand and had to rely on subtitles like the older games in the series. Nintendo released a patch for Breath of the Wild today that allows players to turn on Japanese audio for their action-adventure critical darling. Players can find the option in the game's main menu after updating and switch over to Japanese, Spanish, German, or Italian. If you're worried that you will inadvertently switch over all the text, too, never fear! Switching over only affects audio. Hooray for small changes that satisfy niche portions of the gaming populace!
  8. Modern games are fantastic. The internet can fix broken games or give long dead titles new life. There are a myriad of benefits to the way gaming today differs from that of the past. One of the less appreciated benefits is translation and localization, which has brought western audiences a huge number of titles from Japan and vice versa. And because of that exchange of gaming, language has become critical to how many people appreciate titles. For some, there is only one "correct" language in which to enjoy certain games or sometimes a game simply sounds better to some of its players in a different language because of the different voice actors used in the localization process. That's why, despite near universal acclaim, some fans of The The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild were disappointed that its western release didn't include the Japanese language version of the game that some saw in the original trailers. Though there were no gameplay differences, some players truly preferred the way the Japanese version sounded over the English version - many attributing this difference to the quality of the voice acting. A separate camp in the community grew to similarly clamor for the Japanese version, not because they could understand the game better, but specifically because they couldn't understand the vocals. The Legend of Zelda has traditionally avoided voice acting in the series and this small subset of gamers preferred a version of the game that they could enjoy in the same way - even if the language used was real - as long as they couldn't understand and had to rely on subtitles like the older games in the series. Nintendo released a patch for Breath of the Wild today that allows players to turn on Japanese audio for their action-adventure critical darling. Players can find the option in the game's main menu after updating and switch over to Japanese, Spanish, German, or Italian. If you're worried that you will inadvertently switch over all the text, too, never fear! Switching over only affects audio. Hooray for small changes that satisfy niche portions of the gaming populace! View full article
  9. It is easy to forget that BioWare took a bold risk when they launched their untested, original IP as an Xbox 360 exclusive back in 2007. The RPG genre had never truly veered into uncharted territory with a mainstream release as with a third-person shooter hybrid. On top of that, it was set in an unknown universe that the marketing team could easily have over-inflated to generate hype only to fall victim to the backlash (remember the cautionary tale of Advent Rising?). However, what made Mass Effect special was that it actually managed to live up to the hype. It worked. It had choices that engaged players. It was full of unique and interesting piece of universe-building and memorable characters. It delivered the sci-fi adventure some people had been waiting their entire lives to see in a video game for the first time. Almost a decade later with a new entry in the franchise releasing this week, does the original Mass Effect stand as not merely a good game, but one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Mass Effect 'Uncharted Depths' by Hy Bound (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02157) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, follow the show on Twitter and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  10. It is easy to forget that BioWare took a bold risk when they launched their untested, original IP as an Xbox 360 exclusive back in 2007. The RPG genre had never truly veered into uncharted territory with a mainstream release as with a third-person shooter hybrid. On top of that, it was set in an unknown universe that the marketing team could easily have over-inflated to generate hype only to fall victim to the backlash (remember the cautionary tale of Advent Rising?). However, what made Mass Effect special was that it actually managed to live up to the hype. It worked. It had choices that engaged players. It was full of unique and interesting piece of universe-building and memorable characters. It delivered the sci-fi adventure some people had been waiting their entire lives to see in a video game for the first time. Almost a decade later with a new entry in the franchise releasing this week, does the original Mass Effect stand as not merely a good game, but one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Mass Effect 'Uncharted Depths' by Hy Bound (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02157) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, follow the show on Twitter and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  11. Nintendo isn't well known for supporting downloadable content, but it seems that things might be different with their upcoming console release. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild will be sold alongside a season pass that gives access to several expansions planned for the title. This marks the first time Nintendo has ever offered DLC for a Legend of Zelda game. The first DLC will release with Breath of the Wild alongside the Switch's launch on March 3 with a second batch following sometime during the summer and a final pack at the end of the year. The pass for the full crop of DLC will cost $19.99. The first piece will add three new treasure chests that contain "useful items" and unique clothing options for Link. The second part of the DLC will add a hard mode to the game, introduce a Cave of Trials challenge, and a "new map feature." The final DLC pack seems to be the most interesting of the three as it expands the base game with new story content, a new dungeon, and more challenges. This move is so unprecedented that Nintendo actually released a short explanatory video for those who don't know about downloadable content. This move has been a long time coming. After dipping their toes into paid DLC for the first time in 2011 with Fire Emblem: Awakening, Nintendo has very, very slowly been seeing how it can successfully incorporate downloadable content into its premier franchises. The move toward mobile gaming over the past year has been a part of their cautious experimentation. Given how pretty much all of these moves have reaped massive rewards for Nintendo, is it really that surprising that Nintendo's largest franchise would be releasing with DLC plans in place? For more Breath of the Wild goodness, be sure to check out our hands-on preview! View full article
  12. Breath of the Wild Will Have a Season Pass

    Nintendo isn't well known for supporting downloadable content, but it seems that things might be different with their upcoming console release. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild will be sold alongside a season pass that gives access to several expansions planned for the title. This marks the first time Nintendo has ever offered DLC for a Legend of Zelda game. The first DLC will release with Breath of the Wild alongside the Switch's launch on March 3 with a second batch following sometime during the summer and a final pack at the end of the year. The pass for the full crop of DLC will cost $19.99. The first piece will add three new treasure chests that contain "useful items" and unique clothing options for Link. The second part of the DLC will add a hard mode to the game, introduce a Cave of Trials challenge, and a "new map feature." The final DLC pack seems to be the most interesting of the three as it expands the base game with new story content, a new dungeon, and more challenges. This move is so unprecedented that Nintendo actually released a short explanatory video for those who don't know about downloadable content. This move has been a long time coming. After dipping their toes into paid DLC for the first time in 2011 with Fire Emblem: Awakening, Nintendo has very, very slowly been seeing how it can successfully incorporate downloadable content into its premier franchises. The move toward mobile gaming over the past year has been a part of their cautious experimentation. Given how pretty much all of these moves have reaped massive rewards for Nintendo, is it really that surprising that Nintendo's largest franchise would be releasing with DLC plans in place? For more Breath of the Wild goodness, be sure to check out our hands-on preview!
  13. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild towers as the Nintendo Switch’s most anticipated title for good reason. In addition to being a new Zelda, thus being a big deal by default, the latest entry in the long-running franchise expands on the series’ formula by featuring a vast open world for players to explore freely. After much anticipation, I had the opportunity to spend roughly 20 minutes of hands-on time with Breath of the Wild. It felt like a fraction of that time because I was completely enamored with Hyrule’s wealth of possibilities. From what I understand, the demo I played was identical to last year’s E3 demo, so the opening events are likely familiar if you’ve read impressions for that version. Link awakens within an ancient temple, beckoned by a mysterious voice. After being bestowed with the magical Sheikah Slate, a multipurpose tool that serves as Link’s map, among other functions, I found and equipped basic clothing. Breath of the Wild’s vibrant world welcomed me with open arms as I exited the structure. There was only one question: Where do I head first? I could have immediately veered off on my own path, but I opted to follow a mysterious hooded man. After catching up with him and absorbing some sage tutorial advice, I embarked on my journey. My first order of business was to climb everything. Link can scale virtually any surface, his actions dictated by a stamina meter ala Skyward Sword. The ability to climbing vastly opens up exploration options. Instead of seeking out a main path, I just scampered up cliffs and improvised my way through areas. Link’s stamina drained rather quickly in the demo to the point of becoming a mild nuisance. Hopefully, it won’t take too long to for players to build up his strength in the full release. I quickly procured my first weapon: a branch. Not quite the Master Sword, but I had to start somewhere. It was a fortunate discovery, since I immediately encountered my first adversary in a lone moblin. Combat itself felt largely identical to previous Zelda games. I slashed, rolled, and leapt in and out of engagement with my foe. The controls felt smooth and responsive as we clashed. The presence of weapon degradation was the most prominent new wrinkle, as it forced me to monitor the state of items. Unfortunately, my branch splintered into pieces before I could finish my adversary, forcing me into a hasty retreat. In an unexpected and humorous moment, the persistent moblin gave chase for several yards. It even followed me down a sheer cliff drop. Even the Nintendo representative guiding me through the demo was taken aback at the beast’s determination. After a lengthy pursuit, the moblin finally decided I wasn’t worth the effort and backed off. That wasn’t the end of my troubles. I turned to discover that I’d accidentally stumbled upon a camp teeming with moblins–and I was completely defenseless. In a stroke of intentionally designed luck, though, I noticed a bow and quiver of arrows laying by a log nearby. There were also a few more branches. Now that I had a larger arsenal, I messed around with Breath of the Wild’s inventory system. Players can quick select weapons in-game on the fly by entering a separate menu. Additionally, hot key options also streamlined selection. I adapted to this new system swiftly, swapping items with ease. Before I tackled the enemy base, my Nintendo rep instructed me to slide the Switch out of its dock and continue playing in handheld mode. The transition from big to small screen was as quick and seamless as advertised. Best of all, the performance didn’t skip a beat and looked great on the smaller display. With my new bow, I took aim and sniped distant enemies, drawing their attention. As the now-alert moblins hurtled towards me, I spotted a nearby shield and quickly equipped it. With my beat-down stick and shield ready, I fought my way through the remaining horde, rolling and collecting additional arrows and sticks mid-fight. Once the last moblin fell, I began collecting the spoils. Among the loot was an actual sword. Hooray, no more branches! That sense of improvement defined much of Breath of the Wild’s experience. Every time I nabbed a new item, I eagerly compared it stats to my existing inventory and wanted to continue searching in hopes of finding greater riches. That’s a fun and necessary incentive to achieve in an open world game. After clearing the area of its riches, I decided to continue towards the main story objective. The waypoint led to a small ruin with a plate to insert the Shiekah Slate. I placed the relic, which triggered a scene where a massive tower emerged from the Earth. Interestingly, the Nintendo Rep pointed out that during this cinematic, moblins are typically present since the structure sprouts near their base. However, since I wiped out the camp before summoning the tower, the moblins were absent. I always appreciate little touches of continuity like that. I’ll have to wait for the full release of Breath of the Wild to see what follows after that tower arose from the ruins as my demo wrapped up shortly thereafter. Although I barely scratched the surface of the tip of the iceberg, I left the demo anxious and excited to get my hands on the full experience. Roaming the open world, discovering items and locations with little to no guidance felt like playing a big-budget remake of the NES Legend of Zelda. It’s a freedom that’s been lacking in the last few console entries, and the next logical leap after A Link Between Worlds (a personal fave) began the shift towards a less linear direction. Breakable weapons largely irritate me in most games, but Zelda tempers that annoyance by sprinkling items all over the place. I was always picking up new equipment, and even though most of them were fragile branches, I had a supply of them to rely on until I found something better. Most importantly, Breath of the Wild was just plain fun. Combat works fine, the picturesque world was a joy to run around in, and the loop of exploration and loot has its hooks. If the gameplay continues to evolve in positive ways, and if they story is up to snuff, Breath of the Wild could be a Zelda game for the ages. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild launches for Switch and Wii U March 3. View full article
  14. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild towers as the Nintendo Switch’s most anticipated title for good reason. In addition to being a new Zelda, thus being a big deal by default, the latest entry in the long-running franchise expands on the series’ formula by featuring a vast open world for players to explore freely. After much anticipation, I had the opportunity to spend roughly 20 minutes of hands-on time with Breath of the Wild. It felt like a fraction of that time because I was completely enamored with Hyrule’s wealth of possibilities. From what I understand, the demo I played was identical to last year’s E3 demo, so the opening events are likely familiar if you’ve read impressions for that version. Link awakens within an ancient temple, beckoned by a mysterious voice. After being bestowed with the magical Sheikah Slate, a multipurpose tool that serves as Link’s map, among other functions, I found and equipped basic clothing. Breath of the Wild’s vibrant world welcomed me with open arms as I exited the structure. There was only one question: Where do I head first? I could have immediately veered off on my own path, but I opted to follow a mysterious hooded man. After catching up with him and absorbing some sage tutorial advice, I embarked on my journey. My first order of business was to climb everything. Link can scale virtually any surface, his actions dictated by a stamina meter ala Skyward Sword. The ability to climbing vastly opens up exploration options. Instead of seeking out a main path, I just scampered up cliffs and improvised my way through areas. Link’s stamina drained rather quickly in the demo to the point of becoming a mild nuisance. Hopefully, it won’t take too long to for players to build up his strength in the full release. I quickly procured my first weapon: a branch. Not quite the Master Sword, but I had to start somewhere. It was a fortunate discovery, since I immediately encountered my first adversary in a lone moblin. Combat itself felt largely identical to previous Zelda games. I slashed, rolled, and leapt in and out of engagement with my foe. The controls felt smooth and responsive as we clashed. The presence of weapon degradation was the most prominent new wrinkle, as it forced me to monitor the state of items. Unfortunately, my branch splintered into pieces before I could finish my adversary, forcing me into a hasty retreat. In an unexpected and humorous moment, the persistent moblin gave chase for several yards. It even followed me down a sheer cliff drop. Even the Nintendo representative guiding me through the demo was taken aback at the beast’s determination. After a lengthy pursuit, the moblin finally decided I wasn’t worth the effort and backed off. That wasn’t the end of my troubles. I turned to discover that I’d accidentally stumbled upon a camp teeming with moblins–and I was completely defenseless. In a stroke of intentionally designed luck, though, I noticed a bow and quiver of arrows laying by a log nearby. There were also a few more branches. Now that I had a larger arsenal, I messed around with Breath of the Wild’s inventory system. Players can quick select weapons in-game on the fly by entering a separate menu. Additionally, hot key options also streamlined selection. I adapted to this new system swiftly, swapping items with ease. Before I tackled the enemy base, my Nintendo rep instructed me to slide the Switch out of its dock and continue playing in handheld mode. The transition from big to small screen was as quick and seamless as advertised. Best of all, the performance didn’t skip a beat and looked great on the smaller display. With my new bow, I took aim and sniped distant enemies, drawing their attention. As the now-alert moblins hurtled towards me, I spotted a nearby shield and quickly equipped it. With my beat-down stick and shield ready, I fought my way through the remaining horde, rolling and collecting additional arrows and sticks mid-fight. Once the last moblin fell, I began collecting the spoils. Among the loot was an actual sword. Hooray, no more branches! That sense of improvement defined much of Breath of the Wild’s experience. Every time I nabbed a new item, I eagerly compared it stats to my existing inventory and wanted to continue searching in hopes of finding greater riches. That’s a fun and necessary incentive to achieve in an open world game. After clearing the area of its riches, I decided to continue towards the main story objective. The waypoint led to a small ruin with a plate to insert the Shiekah Slate. I placed the relic, which triggered a scene where a massive tower emerged from the Earth. Interestingly, the Nintendo Rep pointed out that during this cinematic, moblins are typically present since the structure sprouts near their base. However, since I wiped out the camp before summoning the tower, the moblins were absent. I always appreciate little touches of continuity like that. I’ll have to wait for the full release of Breath of the Wild to see what follows after that tower arose from the ruins as my demo wrapped up shortly thereafter. Although I barely scratched the surface of the tip of the iceberg, I left the demo anxious and excited to get my hands on the full experience. Roaming the open world, discovering items and locations with little to no guidance felt like playing a big-budget remake of the NES Legend of Zelda. It’s a freedom that’s been lacking in the last few console entries, and the next logical leap after A Link Between Worlds (a personal fave) began the shift towards a less linear direction. Breakable weapons largely irritate me in most games, but Zelda tempers that annoyance by sprinkling items all over the place. I was always picking up new equipment, and even though most of them were fragile branches, I had a supply of them to rely on until I found something better. Most importantly, Breath of the Wild was just plain fun. Combat works fine, the picturesque world was a joy to run around in, and the loop of exploration and loot has its hooks. If the gameplay continues to evolve in positive ways, and if they story is up to snuff, Breath of the Wild could be a Zelda game for the ages. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild launches for Switch and Wii U March 3.
  15. Nintendo announced during their live stream this morning that they have finally given a name to their newest Legend of Zelda game. Now known as The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, and its has a brand new trailer highlighting the game's expansive world. Breath of the Wild is expected to release in Spring 2017 for the Wii U and NX. Nintendo is streaming all day, so stay tuned for more updates! View full article
  16. Nintendo announced during their live stream this morning that they have finally given a name to their newest Legend of Zelda game. Now known as The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, and its has a brand new trailer highlighting the game's expansive world. Breath of the Wild is expected to release in Spring 2017 for the Wii U and NX. Nintendo is streaming all day, so stay tuned for more updates!
  17. Big news coming out of Nintendo today. The next console from the company, code-named NX, will be releasing March 2017. No additional information was revealed about the upcoming console, though Nintendo did confirm the console would not be making an appearance at E3 2016. This news might be a little bittersweet for Nintendo fans. The Legend of Zelda Wii U is actually being pushed back to next year to release on both Wii U and NX. Nintendo insists that both the Wii U and NX versions of the title have been in development at the same time. It is worth noting, however, that they go on to say that the reason for the delay is to provide additional time to polish the game - though this release postponement seems to be more related to the desire to launch both versions at the same time. While the delay of the next installment of The Legend of Zelda might be a disappointment, the good news is that we will be seeing a lot of the Wii U version of the title at this year's E3. The bad news is that The Legend of Zelda is pretty much all that we will be able to play from Nintendo at E3. Nintendo has said they will approach E3 differently this year, making The Legend of Zelda Wii U the only playable game that they will be bringing to the show. They claim this is to "provide attendees [with] complete immersion." Today's news comes as a bit of a mixed bag. Yay, console release date! But Zelda is delayed again.... Yay, Zelda will be playable at E3! But that's all that will be playable at E3.... Nintendo, stop playing with our hearts this way.
  18. Big news coming out of Nintendo today. The next console from the company, code-named NX, will be releasing March 2017. No additional information was revealed about the upcoming console, though Nintendo did confirm the console would not be making an appearance at E3 2016. This news might be a little bittersweet for Nintendo fans. The Legend of Zelda Wii U is actually being pushed back to next year to release on both Wii U and NX. Nintendo insists that both the Wii U and NX versions of the title have been in development at the same time. It is worth noting, however, that they go on to say that the reason for the delay is to provide additional time to polish the game - though this release postponement seems to be more related to the desire to launch both versions at the same time. While the delay of the next installment of The Legend of Zelda might be a disappointment, the good news is that we will be seeing a lot of the Wii U version of the title at this year's E3. The bad news is that The Legend of Zelda is pretty much all that we will be able to play from Nintendo at E3. Nintendo has said they will approach E3 differently this year, making The Legend of Zelda Wii U the only playable game that they will be bringing to the show. They claim this is to "provide attendees [with] complete immersion." Today's news comes as a bit of a mixed bag. Yay, console release date! But Zelda is delayed again.... Yay, Zelda will be playable at E3! But that's all that will be playable at E3.... Nintendo, stop playing with our hearts this way. View full article
  19. Remember the keys from Super Mario World that you could take to special keyholes and access new parts of the game level? Well, those are being added to Super Mario Maker in a free update today. Players will be able to place keys by shaking P-switches and keyholes by shaking doors. The additional options this opens up for world builders everywhere are pretty exciting. For example, players can attach keys to enemies to create boss battles required to progress to the end of the level. This update will also affect coins and Thwomps. Players can shake coins in create mode to generate pink coins. When someone traversing a level collects all the pink coins, a key appears to allow for additional progress. Thwomps can now be shaken to turn them into the giant falling columns that first appeared in Super Mario World. The free update brings additional difficulties and rewards to the 100-Mario Challenge. Super Expert will pit players against the hardest of the hard player-created levels. Intrepid gamers who manage to conquer Super Expert will be rewarded with five new Mystery Mushroom costumes. Those who complete Normal and Expert difficulties following the update will be rewarded with three and four new Mystery Mushroom costumes, respectively. As of January 27, there were over 6.2 million Super Mario Maker courses in the world with a total of over 400 million plays of those levels. That's a lot of Mario.
  20. Remember the keys from Super Mario World that you could take to special keyholes and access new parts of the game level? Well, those are being added to Super Mario Maker in a free update today. Players will be able to place keys by shaking P-switches and keyholes by shaking doors. The additional options this opens up for world builders everywhere are pretty exciting. For example, players can attach keys to enemies to create boss battles required to progress to the end of the level. This update will also affect coins and Thwomps. Players can shake coins in create mode to generate pink coins. When someone traversing a level collects all the pink coins, a key appears to allow for additional progress. Thwomps can now be shaken to turn them into the giant falling columns that first appeared in Super Mario World. The free update brings additional difficulties and rewards to the 100-Mario Challenge. Super Expert will pit players against the hardest of the hard player-created levels. Intrepid gamers who manage to conquer Super Expert will be rewarded with five new Mystery Mushroom costumes. Those who complete Normal and Expert difficulties following the update will be rewarded with three and four new Mystery Mushroom costumes, respectively. As of January 27, there were over 6.2 million Super Mario Maker courses in the world with a total of over 400 million plays of those levels. That's a lot of Mario. View full article
  21. The Pokémon arcade fighter will be making its way exclusively to Wii U this March. People who buy the first run edition of Pokkén Tournament will receive a special Shadow Mewtwo amiibo card, which unlocks the powerful fighter in-game when tapped against the Wii U GamePad. Players will be able to make use of the powerful psychic Pokémon's mental arsenal in the various 3D arenas of Pokkén Tournament. Pokkén Tournament launches March 18 as a fully priced $59.99 title. View full article
  22. Pokkén Tournament Receives Release Date

    The Pokémon arcade fighter will be making its way exclusively to Wii U this March. People who buy the first run edition of Pokkén Tournament will receive a special Shadow Mewtwo amiibo card, which unlocks the powerful fighter in-game when tapped against the Wii U GamePad. Players will be able to make use of the powerful psychic Pokémon's mental arsenal in the various 3D arenas of Pokkén Tournament. Pokkén Tournament launches March 18 as a fully priced $59.99 title.
  23. The first part of Telltale Games' five part series set in the world of Minecraft is available now for PC, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Xbox One, and Xbox 360. iOS and Android versions of will release on Thursday, October 15. The series will also be coming to Wii U and PS Vita, though Telltale hasn't said when those versions will be hitting the market. Fully titled Minecraft: Story Mode Episode One - The Order of Stone, we are introduced to the colorful cast of characters and the gigantic force of destruction that threatens to engulf their world. Patton Oswalt, Corey Feldman, Cat Taber, Ashley Johnson , Scott Porter, and Brian Posehn all lend their voices to bring the cast to life. Who would have ever thought that we would hear 80s darling Corey Feldman in a video game (ignore that he starred in the 1995 title Normality)? View full article
  24. The first part of Telltale Games' five part series set in the world of Minecraft is available now for PC, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Xbox One, and Xbox 360. iOS and Android versions of will release on Thursday, October 15. The series will also be coming to Wii U and PS Vita, though Telltale hasn't said when those versions will be hitting the market. Fully titled Minecraft: Story Mode Episode One - The Order of Stone, we are introduced to the colorful cast of characters and the gigantic force of destruction that threatens to engulf their world. Patton Oswalt, Corey Feldman, Cat Taber, Ashley Johnson , Scott Porter, and Brian Posehn all lend their voices to bring the cast to life. Who would have ever thought that we would hear 80s darling Corey Feldman in a video game (ignore that he starred in the 1995 title Normality)?
  25. Ever wanted to take direct control of the Pokémon in one of the numerous turn-based RPGs of varying colors? Did Pokémon Stadium not quite scratch that itch? If that's the case, Pokkén Tournament will be everything you ever wanted. Originally designed as an arcade game that only released in Japan, Pokkén Tournament is heading to the Wii U worldwide spring 2016. Developed as part of a partnership between Nintendo and Bandai Namco, Pokkén Tournament was designed with some of the ideas from more traditional fighting games like Tekken in mind. While it is intended to be accessible for all ages, it seems that Nintendo might even be angling for a depth of play that could bring the fighter to eSports events like Evo or DreamHack. What is clear, however, is that Pokkén Tournament allows players the incredible opportunity to play as Pikachu in a luchador outfit, possibly making it the greatest game to ever exist. I believe that this will undoubtedly move some Wii U units, but what do you think? Is this enough to make you interested in a Wii U or to get a copy day one?