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Found 27 results

  1. The episodic adventure game developer behind the video game adaptations of properties like The Walking Dead, Fables, and Guardians of the Galaxy has announced that they would be undergoing a massive restructuring. As part of that business shift, they let go of over 90 of their employees, roughly 25% of their workforce, effective immediately. The chance was announced as part of an effort to "make the company more competitive as a developer and publisher of groundbreaking story-driven gaming experiences with an emphasis on high quality in the years ahead," according to a representative from Telltale. In case you're worried that this move might push back Telltale's ongoing episodic projects, don't be. As part of their statement, Telltale assured their fans that all previously announced games will not be affected. This restructuring comes on the heels of a series of leadership shake-ups at the independent studio. In 2015, co-founder and CEO Dan Connors stepped down from his position citing that the studio's boom in growth had introduced new challenges. Fellow co-founder Kevin Bruner took Connors' place as CEO with Connors supporting the transition and remaining on Telltale's board of directors. Earlier this year, Bruner stepped down from the CEO position and handed operations of the studio over to Connors, while remaining on the board of directors. Telltale then brought on Pete Hawley, a former vice president at Zynga, to replace Bruner as CEO. Pete Hawley offered a statement on the move that cut nearly 100 jobs from Telltale: Our industry has shifted in tremendous ways over the past few years. The realities of the environment we face moving forward demand we evolve, as well, reorienting our organization with a focus on delivering fewer, better games with a smaller team. I'd like to express our respect for all the contributions that these incredibly talented artists, storytellers and more have made to this company, and that this decision is in no way a reflection on the quality or dedication of their work. We have made available our full career assistance services to help our affected colleagues and friends - and their families - navigate this difficult transition as quickly as possible. The studio plans to invest more resources into "more proven technologies that will fast-track innovation in its core products as it works with new partners to bring its games to new audiences." That extremely corporate sentence indicates that Telltale might finally be putting more development emphasis on the engine that runs its games, which has been criticized in the past for lagging behind its contemporaries. It could also indicate a shift in priorities for the game developer - maybe we will see a more action-oriented game from the studio in the near future? Perhaps the long-rumored original IP that they've been working on for years? Here's hoping that all of the affected members of the Telltale team land on their feet.
  2. The episodic adventure game developer behind the video game adaptations of properties like The Walking Dead, Fables, and Guardians of the Galaxy has announced that they would be undergoing a massive restructuring. As part of that business shift, they let go of over 90 of their employees, roughly 25% of their workforce, effective immediately. The chance was announced as part of an effort to "make the company more competitive as a developer and publisher of groundbreaking story-driven gaming experiences with an emphasis on high quality in the years ahead," according to a representative from Telltale. In case you're worried that this move might push back Telltale's ongoing episodic projects, don't be. As part of their statement, Telltale assured their fans that all previously announced games will not be affected. This restructuring comes on the heels of a series of leadership shake-ups at the independent studio. In 2015, co-founder and CEO Dan Connors stepped down from his position citing that the studio's boom in growth had introduced new challenges. Fellow co-founder Kevin Bruner took Connors' place as CEO with Connors supporting the transition and remaining on Telltale's board of directors. Earlier this year, Bruner stepped down from the CEO position and handed operations of the studio over to Connors, while remaining on the board of directors. Telltale then brought on Pete Hawley, a former vice president at Zynga, to replace Bruner as CEO. Pete Hawley offered a statement on the move that cut nearly 100 jobs from Telltale: Our industry has shifted in tremendous ways over the past few years. The realities of the environment we face moving forward demand we evolve, as well, reorienting our organization with a focus on delivering fewer, better games with a smaller team. I'd like to express our respect for all the contributions that these incredibly talented artists, storytellers and more have made to this company, and that this decision is in no way a reflection on the quality or dedication of their work. We have made available our full career assistance services to help our affected colleagues and friends - and their families - navigate this difficult transition as quickly as possible. The studio plans to invest more resources into "more proven technologies that will fast-track innovation in its core products as it works with new partners to bring its games to new audiences." That extremely corporate sentence indicates that Telltale might finally be putting more development emphasis on the engine that runs its games, which has been criticized in the past for lagging behind its contemporaries. It could also indicate a shift in priorities for the game developer - maybe we will see a more action-oriented game from the studio in the near future? Perhaps the long-rumored original IP that they've been working on for years? Here's hoping that all of the affected members of the Telltale team land on their feet. View full article
  3. Walker Stalker Boston 8/19-20th

    Walker Stalker Con Calendar Event Schedule is up and ready for volunteers for Walker Stalker Aug 19th and 20th. 2 shifts per day 9 AM - 2 PM 1 PM - 6 PM
  4. Telltale followed up their first entry into the world of The Walking Dead with a second season that did a number of risky things in the world of video games. Players took on the role of Clementine, a young girl who has been burdened with the onerous task of growing up during the apocalypse. The brutality, the cruelty of life under those desperate circumstances permeate Season 2. Tough decisions allow players to shape what kind of a person our hero may become and the haunting prompts from the previous season, "Clementine will remember that," are now left unsaid, but hang heavy in every facial expression. As a sequel to an episodic game that some claimed was the greatest adventure game of all time, does The Walking Dead: Season Two stand up on its own merits as one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Walking Dead: Season Two 'In the Pines - Credits Theme' by Jared Emerson-Johnson & Janel Drewis (https://telltalegames.bandcamp.com/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  5. Telltale followed up their first entry into the world of The Walking Dead with a second season that did a number of risky things in the world of video games. Players took on the role of Clementine, a young girl who has been burdened with the onerous task of growing up during the apocalypse. The brutality, the cruelty of life under those desperate circumstances permeate Season 2. Tough decisions allow players to shape what kind of a person our hero may become and the haunting prompts from the previous season, "Clementine will remember that," are now left unsaid, but hang heavy in every facial expression. As a sequel to an episodic game that some claimed was the greatest adventure game of all time, does The Walking Dead: Season Two stand up on its own merits as one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Walking Dead: Season Two 'In the Pines - Credits Theme' by Jared Emerson-Johnson & Janel Drewis (https://telltalegames.bandcamp.com/) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  6. A new season of Telltale's The Walking Dead begins later this month, which has led to a lot of people wondering what exactly it will be about. Last week, Telltale gave just a bit more information via a sequence taken from the first episode of the upcoming series. In it, we get to know one of our main protagonists, Javier, as he and his family go through the initial outbreak of the zombie virus. At the end of the trailer, we see the heart of Telltale's The Walking Dead: Clementine. The scene with Javier's family takes place years before the events of the game itself, with a more grown up and weathered Clementine. She looks like she's seen some more human depravity and now comes wielding a shotgun. It's both heartbreaking and gratifying to see that the world hasn't taken her down yet. Javier and Clementine will be dealing with pockets of civilization that have formed and adapted to the zombie apocalypse. There have been some obvious improvements to the Telltale Engine, the software Telltales uses to run their games. Animations seem smoother, environments present more objects and details, and the lighting effects have improved (though the eye shine seems a bit distracting). The Walking Dead: A New Frontier premiers on December 20 with two episodes titled titled 'Ties That Bind Part 1' and 'Ties That Bind Part 2.' The episodic adventure series is slated to come to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and mobile devices on the 20th, but Telltale says that it will also come to other platforms at an unspecified time in the future, so Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 owners might still see versions come their way. View full article
  7. A new season of Telltale's The Walking Dead begins later this month, which has led to a lot of people wondering what exactly it will be about. Last week, Telltale gave just a bit more information via a sequence taken from the first episode of the upcoming series. In it, we get to know one of our main protagonists, Javier, as he and his family go through the initial outbreak of the zombie virus. At the end of the trailer, we see the heart of Telltale's The Walking Dead: Clementine. The scene with Javier's family takes place years before the events of the game itself, with a more grown up and weathered Clementine. She looks like she's seen some more human depravity and now comes wielding a shotgun. It's both heartbreaking and gratifying to see that the world hasn't taken her down yet. Javier and Clementine will be dealing with pockets of civilization that have formed and adapted to the zombie apocalypse. There have been some obvious improvements to the Telltale Engine, the software Telltales uses to run their games. Animations seem smoother, environments present more objects and details, and the lighting effects have improved (though the eye shine seems a bit distracting). The Walking Dead: A New Frontier premiers on December 20 with two episodes titled titled 'Ties That Bind Part 1' and 'Ties That Bind Part 2.' The episodic adventure series is slated to come to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC, and mobile devices on the 20th, but Telltale says that it will also come to other platforms at an unspecified time in the future, so Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 owners might still see versions come their way.
  8. Fans of Telltale's The Walking Dead franchise are as ravenous for new details as the titular flesh eaters themselves, and one juicy morsel found the light at Telltale's PAX West panel Friday afternoon. The third season will officially be titled The Walking Dead: A Telltale Series – A New Frontier. Kevin Bruner, co-founder and CEO of Telltale Games described season three "As a harrowing and horrific drama" that delves into the grit and grime of survival in a flesh-eating apocalypse. Players should ready themselves to deal with their beloved Clementine "confronting the new rules of order and justice in a land being brutally reclaimed and rediscovered by what's left of humanity itself." The upcoming season is set roughly four years after the dire events of season two, and features the return of the series' darling Clementine, as well as a mysterious new (and playable) character named Javier. The series' executive producer, Kevin Boyle, explained that the theme of the third season will be fundamentally different than the two season before: When we began this series, we explored what it meant to protect a character like Clementine at all costs. Years later, meeting her for the first time, Javier will begin to unravel the mystery of who Clementine has become, as her story intersects with his - both of them still driven by the things they value most long after society's collapse. A New Frontier will premier this November on PC, console, and mobile platforms. Players can also expect a physical edition that allows access to subsequent episodes as they become available. There's currently no word on what the revealed subtitle might mean for the new season. While "The Walking Dead" has predominantly focused on the southeast regions of the United States, "A New Frontier" might imply a switch of scenery. What are your thoughts? Sound off in the comments. View full article
  9. Fans of Telltale's The Walking Dead franchise are as ravenous for new details as the titular flesh eaters themselves, and one juicy morsel found the light at Telltale's PAX West panel Friday afternoon. The third season will officially be titled The Walking Dead: A Telltale Series – A New Frontier. Kevin Bruner, co-founder and CEO of Telltale Games described season three "As a harrowing and horrific drama" that delves into the grit and grime of survival in a flesh-eating apocalypse. Players should ready themselves to deal with their beloved Clementine "confronting the new rules of order and justice in a land being brutally reclaimed and rediscovered by what's left of humanity itself." The upcoming season is set roughly four years after the dire events of season two, and features the return of the series' darling Clementine, as well as a mysterious new (and playable) character named Javier. The series' executive producer, Kevin Boyle, explained that the theme of the third season will be fundamentally different than the two season before: When we began this series, we explored what it meant to protect a character like Clementine at all costs. Years later, meeting her for the first time, Javier will begin to unravel the mystery of who Clementine has become, as her story intersects with his - both of them still driven by the things they value most long after society's collapse. A New Frontier will premier this November on PC, console, and mobile platforms. Players can also expect a physical edition that allows access to subsequent episodes as they become available. There's currently no word on what the revealed subtitle might mean for the new season. While "The Walking Dead" has predominantly focused on the southeast regions of the United States, "A New Frontier" might imply a switch of scenery. What are your thoughts? Sound off in the comments.
  10. Telltale has announced that next Friday will be a big day of revelation for fans of both The Walking Dead and Batman. They will be holding a panel in the Hydra Theatre of the Grand Hyatt during PAX West. Those who attend in person will be able to ask the panel questions after the various announcements and might be walking away with a giveaway for sitting through the presentation. We don't know exactly what will be shown regarding The Walking Dead at the panel, but the earlier reveal of the third season during E3 left many tantalizing possibilities. We know that this season will feature two playable protagonists, one of which will be series mainstay, Clem. Many expect at least one of the reveals during PAX West to be the fall release date that was hinted at during the initial announcement. Telltale will also be hosting a Crowd Play event using the new in-game Crowd Play feature that they've developed to make Telltale games a more multiplayer experience. This year, attendees of the Crowd Play event will be able to cooperatively play through Batman Episode 1: Realm of Shadows before receiving an early, exclusive look at the upcoming Episode 2: Children of Arkham. Giveaways will follow this event as well, and the press release included a winky face after that bit of information. Not entirely sure how to take that, but you might want to go to the Crowd Play event if you can.
  11. Telltale has announced that next Friday will be a big day of revelation for fans of both The Walking Dead and Batman. They will be holding a panel in the Hydra Theatre of the Grand Hyatt during PAX West. Those who attend in person will be able to ask the panel questions after the various announcements and might be walking away with a giveaway for sitting through the presentation. We don't know exactly what will be shown regarding The Walking Dead at the panel, but the earlier reveal of the third season during E3 left many tantalizing possibilities. We know that this season will feature two playable protagonists, one of which will be series mainstay, Clem. Many expect at least one of the reveals during PAX West to be the fall release date that was hinted at during the initial announcement. Telltale will also be hosting a Crowd Play event using the new in-game Crowd Play feature that they've developed to make Telltale games a more multiplayer experience. This year, attendees of the Crowd Play event will be able to cooperatively play through Batman Episode 1: Realm of Shadows before receiving an early, exclusive look at the upcoming Episode 2: Children of Arkham. Giveaways will follow this event as well, and the press release included a winky face after that bit of information. Not entirely sure how to take that, but you might want to go to the Crowd Play event if you can. View full article
  12. The Walking Dead: Season Three is here with a seasoned Clementine. The innocent sweet pea of season one has aged into a hardened teenager. With the ever-present threat of walkers she embarks on a new journey. Season Three introduces a new character, a man named Javier, who has managed to survive the horrifying world they call home. He will share the burden with Clem as players will play through the game controlling both charters. “Clem has also been through a lot since we left her at the end of Season Two,” stated Telltale, "depending on the paths players may have taken with her in the past, she may or may not be exactly the same person we knew back then.” The choices from Season Two will not be in vain because it will effect how Clem reacts to situations in Season Three, and who you may or may not come across on your journey. You can help Clementine in her grand struggle to survive this fall when the third series of Telltale's The Walking Dead begins. View full article
  13. The Walking Dead: Season Three is here with a seasoned Clementine. The innocent sweet pea of season one has aged into a hardened teenager. With the ever-present threat of walkers she embarks on a new journey. Season Three introduces a new character, a man named Javier, who has managed to survive the horrifying world they call home. He will share the burden with Clem as players will play through the game controlling both charters. “Clem has also been through a lot since we left her at the end of Season Two,” stated Telltale, "depending on the paths players may have taken with her in the past, she may or may not be exactly the same person we knew back then.” The choices from Season Two will not be in vain because it will effect how Clem reacts to situations in Season Three, and who you may or may not come across on your journey. You can help Clementine in her grand struggle to survive this fall when the third series of Telltale's The Walking Dead begins.
  14. Walker Stalker Con Boston 7/30-31

    Walker Stalker Boston Calendar Link We just got into Walker Stalker Con!!! We have a limited number of badges for this con, so in order to manage this one, we're switching it up a little. We're only going to do a 3 person all day shift for the table each day. This will still allow for anyone there to take turns exploring the con floor, I promise. SAT (9 AM - 6 PM) 1 Senior Volunteer, 2 Volunteers SUN (9 AM - 6 PM 1 Senior Volunteer, 2 Volunteers
  15. Walker Stalker Con 7/30-31

    until
    Walker Stalker Boston Folks, We have a limited number of badges for this con, so in order to manage this one, we're switching it up a little. We're only going to do a 3 person all day shift for the table each day. This will still allow for anyone there to take turns exploring the con floor, I promise. SAT (9 AM - 6 PM) @aradiadarling, David (Too Cool for a Community Proifile) DiMare-Messier, @DMo2TheMax SUN (9 AM - 6 PM) @aradiadarling, David (Once Again too cool for a community profile) DiMare-Messier, @Merissa Floorplan and vendor booth assignments attached. WS.Boston.LAYOUTS.pdf
  16. The Walking Dead: Michonne launches this month and Telltale has gone so far as to tease the release of its three episode miniseries with an extended preview of the opening minutes of the premier episode. Titled 'In Too Deep,' episode one deals with Michonne joining Pete and his crew aboard a ship called The Companion. However, things go wrong when they follow a desperate signal for help and find a the site of a horrific slaughter. That leads them to a floating colony of survivors called Monroe, an isolated safe haven that might just be hiding the twisted person behind the massacre. As for the preview itself... I'll give you fair warning: It's heavy, even by The Walking Dead's standards. 'In Too Deep' releases on February 23 for PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PC, and Mac. It will be followed by an iOS and Android release on February 25. The second episode, titled 'Give No Shelter,' will be released sometime in March, while the final entry in the miniseries 'What We Deserve,' will become available in April. The entire miniseries will cost $14.99. Though the series isn't a full season, Telltale seems to be giving it the star treatment. They've brought on Samira Wiley of Orange is the New Black fame to voice Michonne. The press releases about the title compare it to the first season of Telltale's The Walking Dead series and tout its many (over 100) Game of the Year awards. For fans of The Walking Dead graphic novels and show, this Michonne miniseries will fill in missing gaps in the iconic sword-wielding woman's story.
  17. The Walking Dead: Michonne launches this month and Telltale has gone so far as to tease the release of its three episode miniseries with an extended preview of the opening minutes of the premier episode. Titled 'In Too Deep,' episode one deals with Michonne joining Pete and his crew aboard a ship called The Companion. However, things go wrong when they follow a desperate signal for help and find a the site of a horrific slaughter. That leads them to a floating colony of survivors called Monroe, an isolated safe haven that might just be hiding the twisted person behind the massacre. As for the preview itself... I'll give you fair warning: It's heavy, even by The Walking Dead's standards. 'In Too Deep' releases on February 23 for PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PC, and Mac. It will be followed by an iOS and Android release on February 25. The second episode, titled 'Give No Shelter,' will be released sometime in March, while the final entry in the miniseries 'What We Deserve,' will become available in April. The entire miniseries will cost $14.99. Though the series isn't a full season, Telltale seems to be giving it the star treatment. They've brought on Samira Wiley of Orange is the New Black fame to voice Michonne. The press releases about the title compare it to the first season of Telltale's The Walking Dead series and tout its many (over 100) Game of the Year awards. For fans of The Walking Dead graphic novels and show, this Michonne miniseries will fill in missing gaps in the iconic sword-wielding woman's story. View full article
  18. In 2012, the minor indie studio Telltale Games exploded into the mainstream consciousness with the five episode Walking Dead series. Released across every device capable of running it, Robert Kirkman's comic opus made the leap to gaming and received tremendous praise, winning numerous awards for storytelling, voice acting, and all-around goodness. Three years later, is it one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and (soon) iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod Outro music: The Walking Dead: Season One 'Don't Go' by RoeTaKa (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03244) New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday.
  19. In 2012, the minor indie studio Telltale Games exploded into the mainstream consciousness with the five episode Walking Dead series. Released across every device capable of running it, Robert Kirkman's comic opus made the leap to gaming and received tremendous praise, winning numerous awards for storytelling, voice acting, and all-around goodness. Three years later, is it one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and (soon) iTunes. A YouTube version is available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod Outro music: The Walking Dead: Season One 'Don't Go' by RoeTaKa (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03244) New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday. View full article
  20. Telltale Games has been experiencing a golden age since the release of The Walking Dead season one three years ago. I very much contend that the studio hasn’t made a bad game since, and their first season of Game of Thrones is no exception. That doesn’t mean, however, that Telltale’s Game of Thrones exists free of problems. Despite the backing name of HBO’s most popular show, this might just be one of Telltale’s most muddled offerings since Lee and Clementine turned the company’s fortunes in 2013. I believe that the core narrative problems stem from an effort to emulate the show and books by cutting between our five main characters combined with the limitations of Telltale’s aging storytelling infrastructure. *minor spoilers ahead* The first season of Telltale’s Game of Thrones focuses on the plight of the noble House Forrester. The small, but important, family tasked with supplying the kingdom’s ironwood falls into dark times as it becomes embroiled in the political fallout of the infamous Red Wedding. Rotating between five members of the Forrester household spread across Westeros and beyond, players are tasked with keeping House Forrester from being wiped out by the scheming Whitehills and their backer, Ramsey Snow. The first episode proves incredibly effective at illustrating this premise while also introducing all of the main cast and their individual plot threads. We have Gared Tuttle, a squire to Lord Forrester who hears the nobleman's cryptic last words that send him on a journey to the Wall and beyond. In their darkest hour, the Forrester family sends for the exiled Asher Forrester who has become a mercenary across the Narrow Sea. Stranded in King’s Landing, the political heart of Westeros, Mira Forrester plays a dangerous game to protect her house from afar. In the absence of his father and elder brothers, Ethan Forrester must put aside his childhood in order to keep the Forrester keep of Ironrath from falling into devious hands. Gravely wounded and presumed dead, Rodrik, the eldest son of the Forrester clan creeps back home to prevent almost certain disaster. These various plot threads weave together to form a narrative that is at turns compelling and frustrating. While cutting between the diverse cast of characters certainly provides an interesting dynamic that other Telltale series lack, it sometimes felt more like a gimmick than a genuine asset. This feels particularly true of episodes two through four which seems to have certain characters treading water while more interesting things happen elsewhere. Writing diverse storylines and characters can be incredibly difficult, but because of the dead air in those episodes the momentum of the story slows to a crawl. For example, we seem to spend an awful lot of time with Mira in King’s Landing as she tries to make allies, but the payoff for that time often feels unrelated to what actions were taken during the time we were with her. That time could have been spent building relationships between other characters, bolstering the importance of player decisions. That isn’t to say that Mira doesn’t have important things to do during the six episode series, but rather sometimes the story seems to be subservient to the format instead of the reverse. That isn’t to say that there aren’t really awesome moments in Telltale’s Game of Thrones. Choosing to defiantly stand up to the Whitehills; guiding Mira through a delicate dinner party to successfully uncover an infernal plot against the Forrester family; and the heartrending climax of episode six are some of the best written moments in Telltale’s catalog. Those moments really work and feel equal parts Telltale at the height of its powers and Game of Thrones offering its mix of honor, duty, and backstabbery. However, I think that above all, Telltale’s Game of Thrones reveals the limits of what their current engine and game design strategy is capable of accomplishing. I had almost nothing but good things to say about the Tales from the Borderlands series that released alongside Game of Thrones. However, it existed comfortably in a relatively linear story that could diverge and reconnect relatively easily. Telltale’s design formula and engine work best within those constraints. To say that the world presented in Game of Thrones operates on the same level misses the mark entirely. Throughout the series I was constantly questioning why there weren’t more options. “Why doesn’t Mira do this? Why doesn’t Rodrik say that?” I’d think, “Surely there are other ways of dealing with this situation.” Having an incredibly limited way of dealing with tricky political situations seems at odds with the setting depicted in Game of Thrones. Telltale needed to do something a bit different mechanically to really pull off this series, but it stuck to the formula. That decision ultimately works to the series' detriment. While many Telltale games offer relatively few truly game-altering choices, often the illusion of choice is enough. Not so with Game of Thrones. It is actually frustrating to lose favor in court regardless of whether you play safe or live on the edge. That some important figures react the same way regardless of players’ decisions feels wrong for Game of Thrones. That I was so frustrated by the preordained decisions shows how attached I became to the cast through the well-written dialogue, but also shows that something else wasn't quite working. Not only does the story suffer from periods of treading water and impotence, the artistic style just doesn’t work the majority of the time. They were clearly going for an oil painting aesthetic that only sometimes hits the mark. More often than not, a strange background filter renders background objects to look incredibly pixelated or even poorly drawn. These starkly contrasting background objects appear most frequently in the first four episodes, but Telltale seems to have been aware of the problem as those jarring visuals are dimished in the final episodes. The only moments I wasn’t actively bothered by the visual choices for this style were in the establishing shots, but even those were often reused between episodes. Coming on the heels of Tales from the Borderlands, I expected to hear some captivating music. Perhaps Telltale would include a chilling rendition of 'The Rains of Castamere' or more variations of Talia’s lament. Unfortunately, that never happens. The music serves its purpose, but it never soars to the heights of tracks like 'In the Pines' or 'To the Top.' While Tales from the Borderlands feels like composer Jared Emerson-Johnson on his A-game, Game of Thrones feels more like his B-game. Conclusion: Telltale’s Game of Thrones is made for people who are already thoroughly invested in the world depicted in A Song of Ice and Fire. If you knew place names like King’s Landing, the Wall, or 'The Rains of Castamere,' you’ll thoroughly enjoy Telltale’s Game of Thrones. Just beware that this is definitively only the first season, and it does not end on a satisfying conclusion. The fate of House Forrester is left hanging in the wind and mysteries like the North Grove go unexplained. There are very genuine high points that will leave you gaping; moments that will have you giving an involuntary fist-pump; and periods of rage toward certain characters. The emotional highs are captivating, but it takes some patience to accept Telltale’s latest offering for what it is and bear with the plodding times between those highs. Game of Thrones – A Telltale Games Series was reviewed on PC and is available now for PC, Mac, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Xbox One, Xbox 360, iOS, and Android. View full article
  21. Telltale Games has been experiencing a golden age since the release of The Walking Dead season one three years ago. I very much contend that the studio hasn’t made a bad game since, and their first season of Game of Thrones is no exception. That doesn’t mean, however, that Telltale’s Game of Thrones exists free of problems. Despite the backing name of HBO’s most popular show, this might just be one of Telltale’s most muddled offerings since Lee and Clementine turned the company’s fortunes in 2013. I believe that the core narrative problems stem from an effort to emulate the show and books by cutting between our five main characters combined with the limitations of Telltale’s aging storytelling infrastructure. *minor spoilers ahead* The first season of Telltale’s Game of Thrones focuses on the plight of the noble House Forrester. The small, but important, family tasked with supplying the kingdom’s ironwood falls into dark times as it becomes embroiled in the political fallout of the infamous Red Wedding. Rotating between five members of the Forrester household spread across Westeros and beyond, players are tasked with keeping House Forrester from being wiped out by the scheming Whitehills and their backer, Ramsey Snow. The first episode proves incredibly effective at illustrating this premise while also introducing all of the main cast and their individual plot threads. We have Gared Tuttle, a squire to Lord Forrester who hears the nobleman's cryptic last words that send him on a journey to the Wall and beyond. In their darkest hour, the Forrester family sends for the exiled Asher Forrester who has become a mercenary across the Narrow Sea. Stranded in King’s Landing, the political heart of Westeros, Mira Forrester plays a dangerous game to protect her house from afar. In the absence of his father and elder brothers, Ethan Forrester must put aside his childhood in order to keep the Forrester keep of Ironrath from falling into devious hands. Gravely wounded and presumed dead, Rodrik, the eldest son of the Forrester clan creeps back home to prevent almost certain disaster. These various plot threads weave together to form a narrative that is at turns compelling and frustrating. While cutting between the diverse cast of characters certainly provides an interesting dynamic that other Telltale series lack, it sometimes felt more like a gimmick than a genuine asset. This feels particularly true of episodes two through four which seems to have certain characters treading water while more interesting things happen elsewhere. Writing diverse storylines and characters can be incredibly difficult, but because of the dead air in those episodes the momentum of the story slows to a crawl. For example, we seem to spend an awful lot of time with Mira in King’s Landing as she tries to make allies, but the payoff for that time often feels unrelated to what actions were taken during the time we were with her. That time could have been spent building relationships between other characters, bolstering the importance of player decisions. That isn’t to say that Mira doesn’t have important things to do during the six episode series, but rather sometimes the story seems to be subservient to the format instead of the reverse. That isn’t to say that there aren’t really awesome moments in Telltale’s Game of Thrones. Choosing to defiantly stand up to the Whitehills; guiding Mira through a delicate dinner party to successfully uncover an infernal plot against the Forrester family; and the heartrending climax of episode six are some of the best written moments in Telltale’s catalog. Those moments really work and feel equal parts Telltale at the height of its powers and Game of Thrones offering its mix of honor, duty, and backstabbery. However, I think that above all, Telltale’s Game of Thrones reveals the limits of what their current engine and game design strategy is capable of accomplishing. I had almost nothing but good things to say about the Tales from the Borderlands series that released alongside Game of Thrones. However, it existed comfortably in a relatively linear story that could diverge and reconnect relatively easily. Telltale’s design formula and engine work best within those constraints. To say that the world presented in Game of Thrones operates on the same level misses the mark entirely. Throughout the series I was constantly questioning why there weren’t more options. “Why doesn’t Mira do this? Why doesn’t Rodrik say that?” I’d think, “Surely there are other ways of dealing with this situation.” Having an incredibly limited way of dealing with tricky political situations seems at odds with the setting depicted in Game of Thrones. Telltale needed to do something a bit different mechanically to really pull off this series, but it stuck to the formula. That decision ultimately works to the series' detriment. While many Telltale games offer relatively few truly game-altering choices, often the illusion of choice is enough. Not so with Game of Thrones. It is actually frustrating to lose favor in court regardless of whether you play safe or live on the edge. That some important figures react the same way regardless of players’ decisions feels wrong for Game of Thrones. That I was so frustrated by the preordained decisions shows how attached I became to the cast through the well-written dialogue, but also shows that something else wasn't quite working. Not only does the story suffer from periods of treading water and impotence, the artistic style just doesn’t work the majority of the time. They were clearly going for an oil painting aesthetic that only sometimes hits the mark. More often than not, a strange background filter renders background objects to look incredibly pixelated or even poorly drawn. These starkly contrasting background objects appear most frequently in the first four episodes, but Telltale seems to have been aware of the problem as those jarring visuals are dimished in the final episodes. The only moments I wasn’t actively bothered by the visual choices for this style were in the establishing shots, but even those were often reused between episodes. Coming on the heels of Tales from the Borderlands, I expected to hear some captivating music. Perhaps Telltale would include a chilling rendition of 'The Rains of Castamere' or more variations of Talia’s lament. Unfortunately, that never happens. The music serves its purpose, but it never soars to the heights of tracks like 'In the Pines' or 'To the Top.' While Tales from the Borderlands feels like composer Jared Emerson-Johnson on his A-game, Game of Thrones feels more like his B-game. Conclusion: Telltale’s Game of Thrones is made for people who are already thoroughly invested in the world depicted in A Song of Ice and Fire. If you knew place names like King’s Landing, the Wall, or 'The Rains of Castamere,' you’ll thoroughly enjoy Telltale’s Game of Thrones. Just beware that this is definitively only the first season, and it does not end on a satisfying conclusion. The fate of House Forrester is left hanging in the wind and mysteries like the North Grove go unexplained. There are very genuine high points that will leave you gaping; moments that will have you giving an involuntary fist-pump; and periods of rage toward certain characters. The emotional highs are captivating, but it takes some patience to accept Telltale’s latest offering for what it is and bear with the plodding times between those highs. Game of Thrones – A Telltale Games Series was reviewed on PC and is available now for PC, Mac, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Xbox One, Xbox 360, iOS, and Android.
  22. The three episode miniseries, titled The Walking Dead: Michonne, tells the story of Michonne during the period between issues #126 and #139 when she mysteriously disappeared from the main group seen in the show and comics. It explores the circumstances of her disappearance and what eventually brings her back to the group. "We've been hard at work on this very special exploration of The Walking Dead universe that will further bridge together our game series with the canon of Robert Kirkman's comic though one of its most complex characters struggling to maintain her own humanity," said Kevin Bruner, Co-Founder and CEO of Telltale Games. "Deeply haunted by the decisions of her past, putting players in the role of a character like Michonne to navigate the broken world around her is an experience that feels uniquely Telltale, and something we simply cannot wait for The Walking Dead fans to play." The titular protagonist, Michonne, will be portrayed by the actress Samira Wiley best known for her award-winning role on Orange is the New Black. It isn't known whether there will be any crossover between the miniseries and the Telltale series, but it wouldn't be out of the question. No word yet on when Season 3 of Telltale's The Walking Dead will release. The Walking Dead: Michonne releases digitally this February on consoles, PC/Mac, and mobile devices. View full article
  23. The three episode miniseries, titled The Walking Dead: Michonne, tells the story of Michonne during the period between issues #126 and #139 when she mysteriously disappeared from the main group seen in the show and comics. It explores the circumstances of her disappearance and what eventually brings her back to the group. "We've been hard at work on this very special exploration of The Walking Dead universe that will further bridge together our game series with the canon of Robert Kirkman's comic though one of its most complex characters struggling to maintain her own humanity," said Kevin Bruner, Co-Founder and CEO of Telltale Games. "Deeply haunted by the decisions of her past, putting players in the role of a character like Michonne to navigate the broken world around her is an experience that feels uniquely Telltale, and something we simply cannot wait for The Walking Dead fans to play." The titular protagonist, Michonne, will be portrayed by the actress Samira Wiley best known for her award-winning role on Orange is the New Black. It isn't known whether there will be any crossover between the miniseries and the Telltale series, but it wouldn't be out of the question. No word yet on when Season 3 of Telltale's The Walking Dead will release. The Walking Dead: Michonne releases digitally this February on consoles, PC/Mac, and mobile devices.
  24. Review: The Walking Dead - Season Two

    The second season of Telltale Games’ The Walking Dead is a harsh slog through death, violence, and zombies. Which makes it all the more incredible that Season Two manages to be masterfully, achingly human. I’ll be attempting to keep this review spoiler-free since the main draw of the Telltale adventure games has always been experiencing the story. The Walking Dead Season Two places players in the shoes of Clementine, the young girl who was a staple character of the previous season. Soon after the second season begins, Clementine becomes separated from her friends and meets a new group of survivors. Players follow her trials and tribulations with the new group and the people they meet as they go through their ordeals. At its core, The Walking Dead Season Two knows how to construct drama. That mastery immediately sets it apart from many other blockbuster video games that rely on set piece spectacle, graphical horsepower, and marketing. Those bigger titles forget that effective drama relies on the audience empathizing and understanding the motivations of the characters. In this area, The Walking Dead Season Two excels. We understand the motivations of the characters, usually within the first few minutes of being introduced to them. Each character, even the bit players, have their own wants and needs, their own motivations. When we see those needs and wants clash, we can genuinely empathize with the situation, even if that situation is full of zombies. If any game makes a compelling case for more diverse video game casts, it is the second season of The Walking Dead. The most interesting characters of the second season are mostly women. There are several non-white characters. There is even a great moment involving a male character who is in a relationship with another man. All of this comes together to create a more interesting narrative. Seeing different views and ideologies collide is fascinating, especially when you can understand their viewpoints. As the season progresses, the player comes to an understanding of the level of violence permissible in the world of The Walking Dead and that understanding elevates the drama. When characters that we care about are threatened by intense, graphic violence we don’t want that to happen on a very fundamental level. When I say that the violence is some of the most graphic I have seen in a video game, I am not being hyperbolic. In particular, one scene stands out. There is a segment that involves a character being beaten into an unrecognizable, bloody mess with a crowbar. It is nauseatingly awful to witness and that is precisely the point. The Walking Dead’s second season makes a statement about how easily we accept horrific acts in our video games and how those acts are almost always treated casually or loosely justified with statements like, “It was war,” or even more simply, “they were the bad guys.” The brilliance of The Walking Dead Season 2 is that instances of violence, even in the most extreme cases, are never cheap and there is always an underlying point to their existence. I’m currently playing through Wolfenstein: The New Order, so it is hard for me not to compare how violence works in each title. Don’t get me wrong, Wolfenstein: The New Order is a great game, but it falls into a category that I like to call, “well executed dumb.” It is trying to take players on a violence fueled romp through the ranks of Nazi’s who have taken over the world. The core mechanics all revolve around killing. I’d argue that violence is the end goal of Wolfenstein. If you take away the violent interactions there is no game left. You are never meant to think about the Nazi soldiers you kill in Wolfenstein as human beings. You are meant to think of them as monsters. There is nothing wrong with violence for its own sake, sometimes it can be very cathartic. However, violence by itself is empty excitement. When you compare the violence of The Walking Dead Season Two with that of Wolfenstein, you find that The Walking Dead uses violence with a purpose. For Telltale, violence is the means to an end. Let’s return to the crowbar scene that I mentioned earlier. What end does the incident serve? On a purely base level for the player it provides a certain amount of catharsis seeing an “evil” character get some form of retribution. On a character level it is a statement about what kind of a person Clementine is becoming. It is a pivotal moment where she, and by extension the player, is given multiple opportunities to leave and let the event go unwitnessed. Whether the player decides to stay or leave says something about what Clementine has learned in her time surviving the apocalypse. Then the scene drags on and on. It becomes grotesque. It is not pleasant to sit through, nor was it intended to be. Why does such an occurrence of violence feel so strange and unique in the gaming world? In fact, it is remarkable how often games create similar scenes or situations and treat them casually. How many soldiers have we mowed down in Call of Duty without giving it a second thought? How about Grand Theft Auto? In real life the acts we see performed in most video games would be utterly awful. In that way, despite its cel-shaded graphics and preposterous setting, The Walking Dead Season Two feels like one of the most honest depictions of violence that video games have to offer. It is enough that it makes one question; should violence be so easily digested? Midway through episode two Clementine is asked what she thinks is the most important thing in the world. No matter what response the player chooses the answer, Telltale’s writers tell us, is family. Where growing up was the central idea of the first season, family is the theme of the second season. We see Clementine through the struggles of surviving alone and then through the struggles of surviving with the people with whom fate has stuck her, much like how we are all stuck with our own families. In fact, there are a lot of different topics that are brought up over the course of playing the Walking Dead Season Two. A lot of people die, causing many characters to question the meaning of life and whether living is worth the trouble. Some find it hard to go on, others soldier on because it is the only thing they know how to do. How important is friendship and family in the face of life or death? Do children belong in such a world? Are the zombies or the humans the real monsters? Often Telltale forces players to make split second decisions; choices made in the heat of the moment that perhaps reflect a truth about how the player views the world. All of this serious talk might make it seem like The Walking Dead Season Two is doom and gloom all the way through, but that would be a misrepresentation. There is real joy and laughter nestled amongst the sadness and loss. I laughed out loud at several moments and smiled through others. A lot of the humor derives from Clementine being a young girl who is treated out of necessity as an adult. Most of the time she rises to the occasion admirably, but sometimes she can’t help but show how in many ways she is still a kid. Maybe those moments taken out of context weren’t hilarious, but any levity serves such a contrast against the dismal backdrop of the world that a good guffaw isn’t too far away when the comedy hits. You’ve probably noticed by now that I haven’t said much about the gameplay. That’s because there isn’t much to say about it. It is the least interesting aspect of Telltale’s recent adventure games and The Walking Dead Season Two isn’t an exception. Between the decisions that players will make are action segments comprised of quick time events. They’re not interesting by themselves, but the context of what players view on the screen makes them bearable. Tapping the Q key is not an interesting way to interact with a game. Often, interactivity is limited even during the moments when players are allowed to search an environment. However, I am more than happy to put up with the annoyance of quick time events and limited interactivity if I can experience more narratives of the quality produced by Telltale Games. The third season of Telltale’s The Walking Dead has been confirmed which leads me to wonder how the next season will work. The ending of the second season diverges wildly after a certain point of decision the player makes as Clementine, resulting in three different core endings, two of which have several different ways they can play out. This would make it very difficult to start the third season with Clementine remaining as the main character. Perhaps Telltale’s writers will perform some complicated word jiu-jitsu and make it work, but I think it is more likely that next season will have a different protagonist and Clementine will make an appearance as one of the side characters. Only time will tell for certain, though. Conclusion: The Walking Dead Season Two is one of the best narrative-focused games to be released this year. The writing is excellent, the performances are compelling, and the emotions it evokes are potent. The lack of variety in the interactions with the game world is overshadowed by the powerful narrative. Anything that might distract from the core experience with the story has been stripped away, revealing a journey with characters that will break your heart, mend it, and then shatter it all over again. The Walking Dead Season Two is available on PC, Xbox 360, and PlayStation 3.
  25. The second season of Telltale Games’ The Walking Dead is a harsh slog through death, violence, and zombies. Which makes it all the more incredible that Season Two manages to be masterfully, achingly human. I’ll be attempting to keep this review spoiler-free since the main draw of the Telltale adventure games has always been experiencing the story. The Walking Dead Season Two places players in the shoes of Clementine, the young girl who was a staple character of the previous season. Soon after the second season begins, Clementine becomes separated from her friends and meets a new group of survivors. Players follow her trials and tribulations with the new group and the people they meet as they go through their ordeals. At its core, The Walking Dead Season Two knows how to construct drama. That mastery immediately sets it apart from many other blockbuster video games that rely on set piece spectacle, graphical horsepower, and marketing. Those bigger titles forget that effective drama relies on the audience empathizing and understanding the motivations of the characters. In this area, The Walking Dead Season Two excels. We understand the motivations of the characters, usually within the first few minutes of being introduced to them. Each character, even the bit players, have their own wants and needs, their own motivations. When we see those needs and wants clash, we can genuinely empathize with the situation, even if that situation is full of zombies. If any game makes a compelling case for more diverse video game casts, it is the second season of The Walking Dead. The most interesting characters of the second season are mostly women. There are several non-white characters. There is even a great moment involving a male character who is in a relationship with another man. All of this comes together to create a more interesting narrative. Seeing different views and ideologies collide is fascinating, especially when you can understand their viewpoints. As the season progresses, the player comes to an understanding of the level of violence permissible in the world of The Walking Dead and that understanding elevates the drama. When characters that we care about are threatened by intense, graphic violence we don’t want that to happen on a very fundamental level. When I say that the violence is some of the most graphic I have seen in a video game, I am not being hyperbolic. In particular, one scene stands out. There is a segment that involves a character being beaten into an unrecognizable, bloody mess with a crowbar. It is nauseatingly awful to witness and that is precisely the point. The Walking Dead’s second season makes a statement about how easily we accept horrific acts in our video games and how those acts are almost always treated casually or loosely justified with statements like, “It was war,” or even more simply, “they were the bad guys.” The brilliance of The Walking Dead Season 2 is that instances of violence, even in the most extreme cases, are never cheap and there is always an underlying point to their existence. I’m currently playing through Wolfenstein: The New Order, so it is hard for me not to compare how violence works in each title. Don’t get me wrong, Wolfenstein: The New Order is a great game, but it falls into a category that I like to call, “well executed dumb.” It is trying to take players on a violence fueled romp through the ranks of Nazi’s who have taken over the world. The core mechanics all revolve around killing. I’d argue that violence is the end goal of Wolfenstein. If you take away the violent interactions there is no game left. You are never meant to think about the Nazi soldiers you kill in Wolfenstein as human beings. You are meant to think of them as monsters. There is nothing wrong with violence for its own sake, sometimes it can be very cathartic. However, violence by itself is empty excitement. When you compare the violence of The Walking Dead Season Two with that of Wolfenstein, you find that The Walking Dead uses violence with a purpose. For Telltale, violence is the means to an end. Let’s return to the crowbar scene that I mentioned earlier. What end does the incident serve? On a purely base level for the player it provides a certain amount of catharsis seeing an “evil” character get some form of retribution. On a character level it is a statement about what kind of a person Clementine is becoming. It is a pivotal moment where she, and by extension the player, is given multiple opportunities to leave and let the event go unwitnessed. Whether the player decides to stay or leave says something about what Clementine has learned in her time surviving the apocalypse. Then the scene drags on and on. It becomes grotesque. It is not pleasant to sit through, nor was it intended to be. Why does such an occurrence of violence feel so strange and unique in the gaming world? In fact, it is remarkable how often games create similar scenes or situations and treat them casually. How many soldiers have we mowed down in Call of Duty without giving it a second thought? How about Grand Theft Auto? In real life the acts we see performed in most video games would be utterly awful. In that way, despite its cel-shaded graphics and preposterous setting, The Walking Dead Season Two feels like one of the most honest depictions of violence that video games have to offer. It is enough that it makes one question; should violence be so easily digested? Midway through episode two Clementine is asked what she thinks is the most important thing in the world. No matter what response the player chooses the answer, Telltale’s writers tell us, is family. Where growing up was the central idea of the first season, family is the theme of the second season. We see Clementine through the struggles of surviving alone and then through the struggles of surviving with the people with whom fate has stuck her, much like how we are all stuck with our own families. In fact, there are a lot of different topics that are brought up over the course of playing the Walking Dead Season Two. A lot of people die, causing many characters to question the meaning of life and whether living is worth the trouble. Some find it hard to go on, others soldier on because it is the only thing they know how to do. How important is friendship and family in the face of life or death? Do children belong in such a world? Are the zombies or the humans the real monsters? Often Telltale forces players to make split second decisions; choices made in the heat of the moment that perhaps reflect a truth about how the player views the world. All of this serious talk might make it seem like The Walking Dead Season Two is doom and gloom all the way through, but that would be a misrepresentation. There is real joy and laughter nestled amongst the sadness and loss. I laughed out loud at several moments and smiled through others. A lot of the humor derives from Clementine being a young girl who is treated out of necessity as an adult. Most of the time she rises to the occasion admirably, but sometimes she can’t help but show how in many ways she is still a kid. Maybe those moments taken out of context weren’t hilarious, but any levity serves such a contrast against the dismal backdrop of the world that a good guffaw isn’t too far away when the comedy hits. You’ve probably noticed by now that I haven’t said much about the gameplay. That’s because there isn’t much to say about it. It is the least interesting aspect of Telltale’s recent adventure games and The Walking Dead Season Two isn’t an exception. Between the decisions that players will make are action segments comprised of quick time events. They’re not interesting by themselves, but the context of what players view on the screen makes them bearable. Tapping the Q key is not an interesting way to interact with a game. Often, interactivity is limited even during the moments when players are allowed to search an environment. However, I am more than happy to put up with the annoyance of quick time events and limited interactivity if I can experience more narratives of the quality produced by Telltale Games. The third season of Telltale’s The Walking Dead has been confirmed which leads me to wonder how the next season will work. The ending of the second season diverges wildly after a certain point of decision the player makes as Clementine, resulting in three different core endings, two of which have several different ways they can play out. This would make it very difficult to start the third season with Clementine remaining as the main character. Perhaps Telltale’s writers will perform some complicated word jiu-jitsu and make it work, but I think it is more likely that next season will have a different protagonist and Clementine will make an appearance as one of the side characters. Only time will tell for certain, though. Conclusion: The Walking Dead Season Two is one of the best narrative-focused games to be released this year. The writing is excellent, the performances are compelling, and the emotions it evokes are potent. The lack of variety in the interactions with the game world is overshadowed by the powerful narrative. Anything that might distract from the core experience with the story has been stripped away, revealing a journey with characters that will break your heart, mend it, and then shatter it all over again. The Walking Dead Season Two is available on PC, Xbox 360, and PlayStation 3. View full article