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Found 63 results

  1. August Guild Meeting

    until
    Come join us at Tabletop Board Game Cafe for our August guild meeting! This meeting is open to anyone. We will be discussing upcoming events, fundraising ideas, and game day plans. After the "business" portion of the meeting, we will be staying to play games! This is a great opportunity to learn more about how your participation affects kids at UH Rainbow Babies & Children's and meet other Extra Lifers!
  2. until
    It's a common misconception that Extra Life is solely a video game marathon, when in reality, we had over 15,000 people participate by playing tabletop games just last year! We’re excited to announce that on Saturday, Sept. 23 we will be kicking off the third annual Extra Life Tabletop Appreciation Weekend! Think of Tabletop Appreciation Weekend as the pre-party for the crazy fun that will go down on Game Day on Nov. 4th. Thousands of our #EXTRALIFETabletop supporters will be creating Extra Life teams, playing their favorite games and sharing Extra Life with their friends and fans. Let's give a shout out to tabletop players everywhere for their relentless support of our hospitals and the families they treat!
  3. Tabletop Appreciation 2017

    Hi! Has the 2017 date(s) for the Tabletop Appreciation Weekend been announced yet? extra-life.org/tabletopweekend displays information for 2016. Thanks!
  4. Open Play Weekend - Star City Games

    until
    COVERAGE This is our first time at a major Magic the Gathering event, and we're very lucky to have the support of an industry giant like Star City Games! Final details for this event will be developing this week. Please RSVP on this page if you intend to help, and comment with which times you are available. Further instructions will be provided throughout the week, and if you intend to volunteer and @Sarah doesn't already have your cell phone number, please PM it to her to coordinate badge/ID transfer. All volunteers will be provided with a laminated Extra Life Baltimore Guild 2017 ID Badge. This alone will not get you into events, but will help identify you as part of our group. You may keep your ID badge and lanyard to reuse at future events. PLEASE DO NOT TAKE BADGES PROVIDED BY THE EVENT HOME UNLESS OTHERWISE INSTRUCTED, as these badges may be shared among volunteers.. We are in need of volunteer coverage for the following windows: Saturday 7:30 am - 10:00 am includes setup, this shift is tentative and my begin earlier @Ceraph1216 (partial coverage for setup) 7:30 am - 8 pm includes setup and breakdown, end time is tentative and may leave earlier @Sarah 9:30 am - 1:30 pm @NodnarbDude 1 pm - 8 pm includes breakdown, end time is tentative and may leave earlier @Taco_Girl Sunday 7:30 am - 2:30 pm includes setup @Ceraph1216 10 am - 3 pm @LittleSith 12 pm - 7 pm @NodnarbDude 1 pm - 8 pm includes breakdown, end time is tentative and may leave earlier @Sarah PARKING Please plan on parking 1 hour prior to your volunteering shift. Traffic in the city gets heavy in the late morning. It may be harder to find unoccupied spaces in garages if the weather is nice. Please reference Google Maps to assist you in locating a parking garage close to the convention center. The Sheraton parking garage is most convenient and obvious as you turn in on Conway (not marked on this Maps search), however it fills up very quickly. Google Map of Parking Garages close to the Baltimore Convention Center Volunteers who will be driving to the convention will incur parking expenses. These parking expenses will not be reimbursed, however they can be written off at your end-of-year tax return as volunteer expenses. Please be sure to request a receipt if you use cash-paid event parking. Retain a copy of your receipts for your tax records. PUBLIC TRANSIT The Baltimore Convention Center has it's own light rail stop with service from the Red, Yellow, and Blue lines. MARC Trains run into Baltimore from more distant county departure points, and stop nearest to the Baltimore Convention Center at Camden Yards, which is a comfortable walking distance of several blocks. For further information about using public transit, please visit the Maryland Transit Authority website at https://mta.maryland.gov/. If choosing the Light Rail, it is suggested that you purchase a day pass. You can also message @NodnarbDude with public transit questions. IF YOU INTEND TO USE PUBLIC TRANSIT, PLEASE BE AWARE OF HOURS OF SERVICE BEFORE COMMITTING TO A SHIFT. Volunteers who will be taking buses or trains to the convention will incur transit expenses. These transit expenses will not be reimbursed, however they can be written off at your end-of-year tax return as volunteer expenses. Retain a copy of your receipts for your tax records. EXPLORING THE EVENT OR PARTICIPATION IN OPEN PLAY Before or after your volunteer shift, if your badge does not need to be handed off to another volunteer, you are welcome to explore the event. All provided event badges MUST be turned in to @Sarah, @Ceraph1216, or @NodnarbDude before leaving the Baltimore Convention Center. Badge hand-offs will be coordinated via group text message. If you participate in gameplay, please be sure to remove/conceal your Extra Life name badge. Before, during, and after your shift — especially every minute that you wear your event badge — you are representing Extra Life, Johns Hopkins Children's Center, and the Extra Life Baltimore Guild. Star City Games has generously waived their vendor fees for us in order to make it possible for us to attend and volunteer at this event. It is very important that we maintain a great relationship with the staff at Star City Games so that we can attend their future events. Remember, you are representing a children's charity. If you aren't sure whether or not a particular behavior is appropriate, please check with @Sarah. LUNCHES AND POTTY BREAKS If you need to take a quick bathroom break and you do not have backup coverage at the booth, please take any loose valuable items with you (i.e. laptops, tablets, cell phones). There will be a small lock box available in our booth as well. There are bathrooms conveniently located in the exhibition hall. If you have backup coverage at the booth and need to leave to get food or take a bathroom break, please be courteous and let the other volunteer know that you are leaving the table. Any food you may be able to purchase will be overpriced convention center food. It costs a lot, and doesn't taste great. It is strongly suggested to pack a lunch, snacks, and beverages if possible. SIGNING UP TO VOLUNTEER Please let us know when you can volunteer. I will update the event with confirmed volunteer names below the shifts they have agreed to work. We need one volunteer minimum per shift to start off with, however extra coverage during periods would be appreciated as this is a new event and we're not sure what to expect. For additional details, please message @Sarah, @NodnarbDude or @Ceraph1216. Volunteers will receive ongoing updates and instructions throughout the week and during the event. Thanks so very much for donating your time and energy for the kids! RESOURCES MTA Regional Transit Map Parking Panda - Reserve Parking, Baltimore Convention Center Area Hall A Diagram - Star City Games Open Play Weekend at Baltimore Convention Center:
  5. WashingCon

    until
    This event is now confirmed, but we await further details from the WashingCon team. Posting this event as a "Save the Date." If you would be interested in volunteering at this event, please RSVP. We will add details and a schedule closer to the date. Link to the event: http://www.washingcon.com/
  6. Tabletop Simulator

    So I finally picked up Tabletop Simulator on steam. (I know, I know, its technically a PC game, but its about playing board games!) It's very slick and there is a mod for virtually any board game you can imagine. Is anyone else playing this? I would love to start playing some board games online with others to fill in my time between actual board game days. Let me know!
  7. International Tabletop Day

    until
    International Tabletop Day at Midgard Comics
  8. Tabletop Event

    until
    I am hosting a tabletop event!
  9. This Year International Tabletop Day is April 29th. Last year we had a conflict with Long Beach Comic Con and were not able to set something up within the guild. If we have enough interest we can start planning something and possibly have it at CHLA or if we have enough interest we can plan it for Game Haus since April 29th is still a ways away. (Thanks Dennis for the suggestion) Feel free to chime in below.
  10. until
    This year we’re excited to bring back International Tabletop Day, and you get to be part of it all! While we’re playing on stream to raise donations, you can do the same right alongside us. If you’re a game retailer who wants to participate, we encourage you to click the “Create a Sub Team” button near the top of the page and raise as much as you can! If you’re not a retailer or if you’d prefer not to start your own team, you’re absolutely welcome to join the Geek & Sundry team directly! Those who contribute the highest amount will be receiving some prizes, so stay tuned. Watch with us on the official Extra Life Twitch Channel!
  11. until
    International TableTop Day is coming!! Join the Los Angeles Guild for 12 hours of TableTop gaming and a Blood drive. The marathon will be hosted at Children's Hospital LA in the Stauffer Conference room. Blood donations will be taken at the Hospital Donation Center from 8am to 1pm. Please schedule an appointment here if you plan to Donate Blood. Refreshments for the event will be potluck style. A sign up sheet for potluck items can be found here.
  12. Wyrmwood Tabletop Gaming Giveaway

    Hey Guys.. This isn't so much an idea as it is sharing an opportunity. We were lucky enough to get these items from Wyrmwood to give away for fundraising. I wanted to put this out there so that everyone has a chance that may want a chance. Purpleheart Tabletop Dice Tray ($180 Value) Purpleheart Dice Vault ($75 value), Purpleheart Hero Vault ($70 Value) Every $5 is a entry, so if you donate $20, that's 4 entries, and so on. http://www.extra-life.org/participant/ShawnTodd Donations will be taken up until Extra Life game day (Nov 5th, 2016) and winners of the items will be notified and contacted through their emails/facebook, etc on or about Nov 6th, 2016 after game day has finished.
  13. After spending years and years fine-tuning League of Legends into one of the most played games in the world, Riot Games has released a brand new game, only this time they're targeting the tabletop. Mechs vs. Minions takes place within the League of Legends universe and focuses on a scenario in which Rumble has assembled four diminutive Yordle heroes to teach them how to pilot their very own mechanized suits. Players can choose to take Corki, Heimerdinger, Tristana, or Ziggs into the battles against the roving army of minions that threaten the security of Runeterra. In Mechs vs. Minions, players must work together to put on the best defense they can manage against the oncoming minion threat. Up to four players can battle their way through a ten mission campaign. Each mission lasts approximately 60-90 minutes and can be accompanied by a radioplay to add more of a running narrative to the experience. Riot has brought back the League of Legends voice actors to reprise their roles for the radioplay versions of their characters. The tabletop game includes the following bits: 5 reversible game boards 4 command lines (one for each player) 4 painted mech miniatures Ability and damage decks A sand timer A bomb-like power source miniature 6 metal trackers 4 acrylic shards 4 dice 100 minion miniatures Some kind of large object, trying to break through that sealed box... The initial release of Mechs vs. Minions consists of 30,000 copies. As of this publishing, Mechs vs. Minions has not sold out. If the first wave of the co-op tabletop game sells out, future releases will be coming. Riot will update the Mech vs. Minions section of their store to indicate when those might be coming. With Game Day coming up, anyone think they might be picking up a copy of Mechs vs. Minions? Let us know what you think in the comments!
  14. After spending years and years fine-tuning League of Legends into one of the most played games in the world, Riot Games has released a brand new game, only this time they're targeting the tabletop. Mechs vs. Minions takes place within the League of Legends universe and focuses on a scenario in which Rumble has assembled four diminutive Yordle heroes to teach them how to pilot their very own mechanized suits. Players can choose to take Corki, Heimerdinger, Tristana, or Ziggs into the battles against the roving army of minions that threaten the security of Runeterra. In Mechs vs. Minions, players must work together to put on the best defense they can manage against the oncoming minion threat. Up to four players can battle their way through a ten mission campaign. Each mission lasts approximately 60-90 minutes and can be accompanied by a radioplay to add more of a running narrative to the experience. Riot has brought back the League of Legends voice actors to reprise their roles for the radioplay versions of their characters. The tabletop game includes the following bits: 5 reversible game boards 4 command lines (one for each player) 4 painted mech miniatures Ability and damage decks A sand timer A bomb-like power source miniature 6 metal trackers 4 acrylic shards 4 dice 100 minion miniatures Some kind of large object, trying to break through that sealed box... The initial release of Mechs vs. Minions consists of 30,000 copies. As of this publishing, Mechs vs. Minions has not sold out. If the first wave of the co-op tabletop game sells out, future releases will be coming. Riot will update the Mech vs. Minions section of their store to indicate when those might be coming. With Game Day coming up, anyone think they might be picking up a copy of Mechs vs. Minions? Let us know what you think in the comments! View full article
  15. There are two game day events coming up in the Vermont area that I think our guild members would enjoy attending! On October 22nd and 23rd, Champlain College eSports is hosting a 24 hour Game Day for Burlington at Champlain College. Check out all the details at their event here! Carnage Con is also holding their own 24 hour Game Day event on November 4th and 5th at Killington Grand Resort. Check out info on their event here and here. Both events are looking for volunteers so reach out to me if you are interested and I can direct you to the right people. The Champlain College eSports event actually has a form you can fill out here if you want to volunteer: http://bit.ly/2d4e3EB
  16. Tower Defense. The very words evoke some deep-seated emotions in countless gamers. For fans of the genre, it’s always a joy taking your time to determine where to lay your chess pieces for optimal damage, cerebral, and calm in the same breath. For many others, it’s a nerve-wracking experience best left to the cluttered battleground of mobile gaming. While the genre is still largely dominated by mobile giants like Kingdom Rush, the occasional console and PC variant (Orcs Must Die! and Defense Grid) have come along to throw new blood into the mix in recent years. Oddly enough, however, the world of board gaming has been suspiciously devoid of standout tower defense experiences. Enter Defense Grid: The Board Game. After a warmly received sequel (the original’s development is a long and sordid tale) and even a virtual reality edition for Oculus Rift and Gear VR, developer Hidden Path was approached by the two-man team at Forged by Geeks with the idea to turn the franchise into a co-op tabletop game. “I’ve been addicted to tower defense [since Defense Grid],” says board game developer and Forged by Geeks co-founder Anthony Hanses. “I cannot get enough of tower defense games. If you name it, I’ve probably played it, whether it’s on mobile, console, Steam, whatever. On top of that, I’m a pretty heavy board game enthusiast. One of the frustrations I’ve had being a tower defense enthusiast has been that there just really isn’t an amazing tower defense board game. There’s been a few attempts. One I’ll give a lot of credit is “Castle Panic.” But to me, that’s not tower defense. It doesn’t have lanes. You’re not constructing the classic towers people are familiar with. I like having that feeling, and that’s why we said this is something we want to do.” (Note: Game assets shown are not final. Prototype materials were used for demo purposes) But adopting a well-known franchise for tabletop isn’t an easy process, from a development or legal standpoint. It makes sense that a huge fan of tower defense like Hanses would channel his own sense of determination to get the product off the ground, and convince Hidden Path to endorse it and provide support. Having grown up on the dangerous streets of south Chicago, worked as a firefighter, and worked at Microsoft, Hanses is no stranger to determination. “[Those careers were] a great growing experience, it was about about saving up money, and then finally being able to say ‘hey, let’s try this out,’” Hanses says. “I was advised by a bunch of people to make a simple card game – but ultimately, giving back to the gaming community is taking what I’ve learned, my passion, and doing something no one else could do. That’s where tower defense came in. Even if I never make another board game again after this, I’ll have possibly given something back to the community I love.” While certainly not the first tower defense board game of its kind (Orcs Must Die’s similarly Kickstarted tabletop edition is also still on its way to a public release), Defense Grid’s incarnation might be the first to really nail the various aspects of the genre that make it so appealing, particularly with its own unique brand of gameplay. I got the chance to experience it firsthand at PAX West 2016 in Seattle. Like most tower defense experiences, Defense Grid: The Board Game is played against ever growing waves of various enemy types. “Walkers” serve as your generic meat shield grunts, while tougher types like “Bulwarks” and “Swarmers” employ shields and armor to detract from your weapons’ attack points. Enemies walk in a single line from one end of the grid (made of flippable tiles for maximum replayability) to the other, where your power core awaits. If the aliens manage to walk back to the end of the map with all your cores, that’s game over. The only thing standing between them is a wealth of towers, like the all-purpose machine gun, area-of-effect Inferno, a concentrated laser beam, or a hard-hitting cannon, among plenty others. Strictly a co-op experience, up to four players must manage individual card decks to determine their available strategies. Cards are divided up into three basic categories. Attack commands for towers that are exhausted for the entire turn once used, support cards like “shrapnel bullets” that boost or alter attacks, and special cards that allow you to upgrade towers, temporarily boost their damage, or activate any tower you don’t already have a card for. Playing with friends, it becomes integral to coordinate and combine your strategies, as each player is only allowed to have four cards in their hand. When a card appears to be useless during the current wave, it can either be saved for the next (meaning you draw only enough cards to get back to four) or it can be scrapped for extra points to build and upgrade additional towers. Make no mistake. Despite the hand-holding a more seasoned friend might give you during gameplay, careful strategy is an omnipresent force in Defense Grid. Enemies move shockingly fast down the path towards their objective, making smart tower placement crucial to exploiting choke points and line of sight. Towers can’t shoot through one another, so spreading them out between various angles quickly became our favored strategy. While Walkers proved to be of little issue, the stouter Bulwarks, with their dense shields and armor, were particularly difficult to dispatch of. In true tower defense fashion, you’re at least guaranteed that your attack will strike its target. Unfortunately, an entire shot will need to be wasted to destroy one layer of the Bulwark’s shielding before any damage can be applied to its bug-like exterior. Thankfully, each player also has one special ability that can only be activated once per game. Did you guess giant laser? Because it was a giant bloody laser, that thankfully wiped an entire hex of aliens from the board. Like most enthusiast board games, the rules can be a bit tricky to wrap your head around at first. You’re managing both the mathematics of an enemy force’s health and your meager resources over a fairly lengthy playtime. For someone who nearly flunked high school math, it’s certainly a daunting idea, but as Hanses led me through the process, the game started to take on that pick-up-and-play nature that some of the best games have. I began to worry less about how many cards were left in my hand and devoted my attention to acquiring resource points. I also worried less about the armored Bulwarks, knowing they had to walk through my gauntlet twice. There’s nothing quite like seeing a bit of your future self in whichever player is currently holding a newbie’s hand through the process, invested and excited all around for more. Thankfully, if you’re the kind of board gamer that really enjoys investing in a particular playstyle or alternate game types, Defense Grid features multiple missions, with increasingly tougher enemies and more varied weaponry, all on differently choreographed grid maps. This means replayability not only comes from a normal game’s element of chance, but also as a built in feature to those who invest more time into the game. On top of that, players can individually level up their player character to increase their stats for the next game. For Hidden Path’s part, the support they’ve provided Hanses and fellow Forged by Geeks co-founder Rico Hall has been invaluable. After successful playtesting sessions with the team, the company provided the actual in-game models so Forged by Geeks could produce incredibly accurate miniatures of weapon tower and aliens. An entirely new alien will also make its debut in the board game. Perhaps most surprisingly, Forged by Geeks is taking their time producing a near-final game before debuting it on Kickstarter. Whereas many board (and video) games often showcase a minor amount of concept art and pre-alpha footage during their campaigns, Forged by Geeks want to leave players with a sense that they’re approaching this as true fans of the genre and franchise, rather than looking to make a quick buck. The funds acquired through Kickstarter will go towards production of the physical product, not the initial design and development costs that most Kickstarters ask for. “Ultimately, we decided that, being a first time Kickstarter studio, there’s a bunch of other risks,” Hanses said. “We haven’t proven our ability to get a game into consumers’ hands. With promising 23 unique miniature designs, 55 to 60 in the box, it’s a high risk to swallow. We’ve seen lots of Kickstarters fail that are now promising minis that just have renders. For us, we needed to get everything sculpted. We’re going to have the game done. When we go to Kickstarter, the rest of the game will just be done.” For Hanses and his colleague, whatever support they receive from genre fans could make or break their careers. Their minimum goal sits at $35,000 to cover production costs, while a stretch goal of $150,000 would cover the previous few years of work put into the game. An even higher stretch goal of $250,000 would allow Hanses and Hall to go into game design full time. Even if they just manage to break even, Hanses will leave happy. The Defense Grid: The Board Game Kickstarter is scheduled to launch on January 17, 2017. View full article
  17. Tower Defense. The very words evoke some deep-seated emotions in countless gamers. For fans of the genre, it’s always a joy taking your time to determine where to lay your chess pieces for optimal damage, cerebral, and calm in the same breath. For many others, it’s a nerve-wracking experience best left to the cluttered battleground of mobile gaming. While the genre is still largely dominated by mobile giants like Kingdom Rush, the occasional console and PC variant (Orcs Must Die! and Defense Grid) have come along to throw new blood into the mix in recent years. Oddly enough, however, the world of board gaming has been suspiciously devoid of standout tower defense experiences. Enter Defense Grid: The Board Game. After a warmly received sequel (the original’s development is a long and sordid tale) and even a virtual reality edition for Oculus Rift and Gear VR, developer Hidden Path was approached by the two-man team at Forged by Geeks with the idea to turn the franchise into a co-op tabletop game. “I’ve been addicted to tower defense [since Defense Grid],” says board game developer and Forged by Geeks co-founder Anthony Hanses. “I cannot get enough of tower defense games. If you name it, I’ve probably played it, whether it’s on mobile, console, Steam, whatever. On top of that, I’m a pretty heavy board game enthusiast. One of the frustrations I’ve had being a tower defense enthusiast has been that there just really isn’t an amazing tower defense board game. There’s been a few attempts. One I’ll give a lot of credit is “Castle Panic.” But to me, that’s not tower defense. It doesn’t have lanes. You’re not constructing the classic towers people are familiar with. I like having that feeling, and that’s why we said this is something we want to do.” (Note: Game assets shown are not final. Prototype materials were used for demo purposes) But adopting a well-known franchise for tabletop isn’t an easy process, from a development or legal standpoint. It makes sense that a huge fan of tower defense like Hanses would channel his own sense of determination to get the product off the ground, and convince Hidden Path to endorse it and provide support. Having grown up on the dangerous streets of south Chicago, worked as a firefighter, and worked at Microsoft, Hanses is no stranger to determination. “[Those careers were] a great growing experience, it was about about saving up money, and then finally being able to say ‘hey, let’s try this out,’” Hanses says. “I was advised by a bunch of people to make a simple card game – but ultimately, giving back to the gaming community is taking what I’ve learned, my passion, and doing something no one else could do. That’s where tower defense came in. Even if I never make another board game again after this, I’ll have possibly given something back to the community I love.” While certainly not the first tower defense board game of its kind (Orcs Must Die’s similarly Kickstarted tabletop edition is also still on its way to a public release), Defense Grid’s incarnation might be the first to really nail the various aspects of the genre that make it so appealing, particularly with its own unique brand of gameplay. I got the chance to experience it firsthand at PAX West 2016 in Seattle. Like most tower defense experiences, Defense Grid: The Board Game is played against ever growing waves of various enemy types. “Walkers” serve as your generic meat shield grunts, while tougher types like “Bulwarks” and “Swarmers” employ shields and armor to detract from your weapons’ attack points. Enemies walk in a single line from one end of the grid (made of flippable tiles for maximum replayability) to the other, where your power core awaits. If the aliens manage to walk back to the end of the map with all your cores, that’s game over. The only thing standing between them is a wealth of towers, like the all-purpose machine gun, area-of-effect Inferno, a concentrated laser beam, or a hard-hitting cannon, among plenty others. Strictly a co-op experience, up to four players must manage individual card decks to determine their available strategies. Cards are divided up into three basic categories. Attack commands for towers that are exhausted for the entire turn once used, support cards like “shrapnel bullets” that boost or alter attacks, and special cards that allow you to upgrade towers, temporarily boost their damage, or activate any tower you don’t already have a card for. Playing with friends, it becomes integral to coordinate and combine your strategies, as each player is only allowed to have four cards in their hand. When a card appears to be useless during the current wave, it can either be saved for the next (meaning you draw only enough cards to get back to four) or it can be scrapped for extra points to build and upgrade additional towers. Make no mistake. Despite the hand-holding a more seasoned friend might give you during gameplay, careful strategy is an omnipresent force in Defense Grid. Enemies move shockingly fast down the path towards their objective, making smart tower placement crucial to exploiting choke points and line of sight. Towers can’t shoot through one another, so spreading them out between various angles quickly became our favored strategy. While Walkers proved to be of little issue, the stouter Bulwarks, with their dense shields and armor, were particularly difficult to dispatch of. In true tower defense fashion, you’re at least guaranteed that your attack will strike its target. Unfortunately, an entire shot will need to be wasted to destroy one layer of the Bulwark’s shielding before any damage can be applied to its bug-like exterior. Thankfully, each player also has one special ability that can only be activated once per game. Did you guess giant laser? Because it was a giant bloody laser, that thankfully wiped an entire hex of aliens from the board. Like most enthusiast board games, the rules can be a bit tricky to wrap your head around at first. You’re managing both the mathematics of an enemy force’s health and your meager resources over a fairly lengthy playtime. For someone who nearly flunked high school math, it’s certainly a daunting idea, but as Hanses led me through the process, the game started to take on that pick-up-and-play nature that some of the best games have. I began to worry less about how many cards were left in my hand and devoted my attention to acquiring resource points. I also worried less about the armored Bulwarks, knowing they had to walk through my gauntlet twice. There’s nothing quite like seeing a bit of your future self in whichever player is currently holding a newbie’s hand through the process, invested and excited all around for more. Thankfully, if you’re the kind of board gamer that really enjoys investing in a particular playstyle or alternate game types, Defense Grid features multiple missions, with increasingly tougher enemies and more varied weaponry, all on differently choreographed grid maps. This means replayability not only comes from a normal game’s element of chance, but also as a built in feature to those who invest more time into the game. On top of that, players can individually level up their player character to increase their stats for the next game. For Hidden Path’s part, the support they’ve provided Hanses and fellow Forged by Geeks co-founder Rico Hall has been invaluable. After successful playtesting sessions with the team, the company provided the actual in-game models so Forged by Geeks could produce incredibly accurate miniatures of weapon tower and aliens. An entirely new alien will also make its debut in the board game. Perhaps most surprisingly, Forged by Geeks is taking their time producing a near-final game before debuting it on Kickstarter. Whereas many board (and video) games often showcase a minor amount of concept art and pre-alpha footage during their campaigns, Forged by Geeks want to leave players with a sense that they’re approaching this as true fans of the genre and franchise, rather than looking to make a quick buck. The funds acquired through Kickstarter will go towards production of the physical product, not the initial design and development costs that most Kickstarters ask for. “Ultimately, we decided that, being a first time Kickstarter studio, there’s a bunch of other risks,” Hanses said. “We haven’t proven our ability to get a game into consumers’ hands. With promising 23 unique miniature designs, 55 to 60 in the box, it’s a high risk to swallow. We’ve seen lots of Kickstarters fail that are now promising minis that just have renders. For us, we needed to get everything sculpted. We’re going to have the game done. When we go to Kickstarter, the rest of the game will just be done.” For Hanses and his colleague, whatever support they receive from genre fans could make or break their careers. Their minimum goal sits at $35,000 to cover production costs, while a stretch goal of $150,000 would cover the previous few years of work put into the game. An even higher stretch goal of $250,000 would allow Hanses and Hall to go into game design full time. Even if they just manage to break even, Hanses will leave happy. The Defense Grid: The Board Game Kickstarter is scheduled to launch on January 17, 2017.
  18. until
    Thank you so much for gaming for the kids! If you haven’t had a chance to sign up for Extra Life again this year, you can do so now at: http://bit.ly/2cEvOGg. In previous years, we have appreciated your dedication to raising funds for patients and families here at your local Children’s Miracle Network Hospital, the UVM Children’s Hospital. We hope to have your support again this year! This Friday, September 16th, our Burlington-Plattsburgh Extra Life Guild is hosting a tabletop appreciation event 6-8pm at Quarterstaff Games on Church Street in Burlington. The event is FREE to attend and will include tabletop gaming, giveaways, and PIZZA! We hope to see you there!
  19. Up to Four Players and a DM

    until
    On September 17th we'll be playing D&D for 6 hours on our Twitch channel as part of the Dungeon and Dragons official team, raising donations for Extra Life. Use your donations to help the Heroes... or the Monsters! For this donation gaming mini-marathon, Eran will be bringing along Aviv Manoach and Uri Lifshitz; the three have already made two very successful 12-hour gaming marathons with their Israeli podcast On the Shoulders of Dwarves. We're directing all funds from this fundraiser to help international efforts, by way of Boston Children's Hospital. https://www.twitch.tv/upto4players http://www.extra-life.org/participant/ut4p
  20. In preparation for Tabletop Appreciation Weekend on Sept. 16-18, Jamison from the Chits and Bits Extra Life team shares why he plays Tabletop games to support Extra Life. As Extra Lifers, we’re gathered together by the common threads of gaming and our desires to make the world around us a little bit better; by turning our passion for games into helping the kids and families that need Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. We give a piece of ourselves, in the form of time and effort, for those that are forced to face what could be the worst moments of their lives. We do this not because of the medals, or recognition, or personal benefit – but because it’s the right thing to do. One third of the Extra Lifers last year were tabletop gamers. Many of us also love video games, and vice versa. But tabletop gaming will always be my first love. Extra Life has recognized that we are a growing part of the team, and last year started Tabletop Appreciation weekend, which this year is September 16th-18th. It will be a time to gather your friends, sit down at a table and play some games, face to face. That’s part of the draw of these games. You can sit down with a complete stranger and forge a bond by the shared experience. Three years ago, I began a 24 hour tabletop game marathon for Extra Life. I was new to the local board game community, so I was very unsure of whether it would be successful. Sitting down and playing games with people I barely knew was an easy way to establish a rapport. I was able to talk to them about what I was doing and why it was important. That quickly translated to new friendships and the growing success of the marathon. I met one of my best friends, Rob, who has helped me take our event further than I ever dreamed. The first year, we raised just over a thousand dollars; our event this spring, we had over 100 participants, and have raised just over $22,000 for The Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital. All from taking a chance over a board game. Tabletop gaming has taken me some amazing places. Extra Life United this past February, was one of them. I met so many people that shared the same passions and goals as I did. I met the families and children that we work so hard to support. I met people like the Enmons and Jeromy Adams, who started Extra Life. Through the lens of playing games, I went home with so many new friends. If I hadn’t sat down at the table, I wouldn’t have had the courage to interact with them. This past spring, I hiked 250 miles of the Appalachian Trail, a lifelong dream, carrying my Extra Life flag every step of the way. I have made it to Gen Con a few times, where I get to meet publishers, designers, board game media people, and tens of thousands of other gamers. All of whom I can connect with in a way that non-gamers can’t really understand. I hope you take the time during Tabletop Appreciation weekend to gather some friends or family and dust off some of those board games you haven’t played in a while. Break out a deck of cards and play some Hearts. Set up the chess board. Share a few hours with someone face to face, without your cell phone, without a screen. Laugh with the people you care about, or even better, a stranger that becomes a friend. If you take a chance, you might find that it’ll pay off. Learn more about how you can participate in Tabletop Appreciation Weekend at extra-life.org/tabletopweekend. View full article
  21. In preparation for Tabletop Appreciation Weekend on Sept. 16-18, Jamison from the Chits and Bits Extra Life team shares why he plays Tabletop games to support Extra Life. As Extra Lifers, we’re gathered together by the common threads of gaming and our desires to make the world around us a little bit better; by turning our passion for games into helping the kids and families that need Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. We give a piece of ourselves, in the form of time and effort, for those that are forced to face what could be the worst moments of their lives. We do this not because of the medals, or recognition, or personal benefit – but because it’s the right thing to do. One third of the Extra Lifers last year were tabletop gamers. Many of us also love video games, and vice versa. But tabletop gaming will always be my first love. Extra Life has recognized that we are a growing part of the team, and last year started Tabletop Appreciation weekend, which this year is September 16th-18th. It will be a time to gather your friends, sit down at a table and play some games, face to face. That’s part of the draw of these games. You can sit down with a complete stranger and forge a bond by the shared experience. Three years ago, I began a 24 hour tabletop game marathon for Extra Life. I was new to the local board game community, so I was very unsure of whether it would be successful. Sitting down and playing games with people I barely knew was an easy way to establish a rapport. I was able to talk to them about what I was doing and why it was important. That quickly translated to new friendships and the growing success of the marathon. I met one of my best friends, Rob, who has helped me take our event further than I ever dreamed. The first year, we raised just over a thousand dollars; our event this spring, we had over 100 participants, and have raised just over $22,000 for The Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital. All from taking a chance over a board game. Tabletop gaming has taken me some amazing places. Extra Life United this past February, was one of them. I met so many people that shared the same passions and goals as I did. I met the families and children that we work so hard to support. I met people like the Enmons and Jeromy Adams, who started Extra Life. Through the lens of playing games, I went home with so many new friends. If I hadn’t sat down at the table, I wouldn’t have had the courage to interact with them. This past spring, I hiked 250 miles of the Appalachian Trail, a lifelong dream, carrying my Extra Life flag every step of the way. I have made it to Gen Con a few times, where I get to meet publishers, designers, board game media people, and tens of thousands of other gamers. All of whom I can connect with in a way that non-gamers can’t really understand. I hope you take the time during Tabletop Appreciation weekend to gather some friends or family and dust off some of those board games you haven’t played in a while. Break out a deck of cards and play some Hearts. Set up the chess board. Share a few hours with someone face to face, without your cell phone, without a screen. Laugh with the people you care about, or even better, a stranger that becomes a friend. If you take a chance, you might find that it’ll pay off. Learn more about how you can participate in Tabletop Appreciation Weekend at extra-life.org/tabletopweekend.
  22. Tabletop Weekend

    http://www.extra-life.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=cms.page&id=1210 So... this is the same weekend as some of the proposed plans but I was wondering if any Toronto gamers are interested? I'd love to do something for this, though I don't know exactly what I'd run, and I'd love to play. Anyone else interested?
  23. Nashville Game Night

    Hello group, The Nashville (Technology) game night happens the third Thursday of every month and focuses tabletop games. After checking with the organizer they are open to having attendees hear about Extra Life. I plan to go to the next one this Thursday at 6-9pm and speak for a moment on Extra Life and bring my tablet with the sign-up app. Here is a link to the Eventbrite event page: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nashville-game-night-registration-16061820337?ref=ebtnebregn Description: "The Nashville Monthly Technology Game Night is a chance to relax and unwind by playing games with friends and colleagues! Snacks, drinks, and lots of fun gaming action in a fun-filled atmosphere at some of the best tech companies in town. B.Y.O.G. (bring your own game) or just show up and see what's "on the table". Dice games, card games, board games, co-op gaming and more. These aren't your grandparents games (or maybe they are if your grandparents are awesome)." If you would like to come register at the link above its free! -Angela
  24. From the album Magic the Gathering Regional Qualifier at Chesapeake Sports Cards, Aug. 9, 2016

    Players were competing for placement in a regional tournament, whose winner would have an opportunity to go to Ireland to compete in the world finals. In retrospect, while these are very dedicated gamers, I feel this type of event is not the best environment for recruitment. It is more likely that players participating in more casual or social MTG events would be more receptive and attentive to participation in Extra Life. People who did sign up were highly engaged and enthusiastic.