Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'switch'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Extra Life News
    • Extra Life Updates
    • Best Practices
    • Community Content
    • Why I Extra Life
    • Fundraising
    • Contests
  • Gaming News
  • Features
  • Podcast

Discussions

  • Extra Life Discussions
    • General Extra Life Discussion
    • Local Extra Lifers
    • Fundraising Ideas
    • Live Streaming Tips & Tricks
    • Official Extra Life Stream Team Discussion
    • Extra Life JSON Code Discussion & Sharing
    • Extra Life United
    • Extra Life Q & A
  • Articles & Extra Life Announcements
    • Announcements
  • Official Extra Life Guilds
    • Guild information and Discussion
    • Canada
    • Northeastern US
    • Southeastern US
    • Central US
    • Western US
  • Gaming Discussions
    • General Gaming Discussion
  • Other Stuff

Calendars

  • Extra Life Community Calendar
  • Extra Life Stream Team
  • Akron Guild
  • Albany Guild
  • Albuquerque Guild
  • Anchorage Guild
  • Atlanta Guild
  • Austin Guild
  • Bakersfield Guild
  • Baltimore Guild
  • Birmingham Guild
  • Boston Guild
  • Burlington Guild
  • Buffalo Guild
  • Calgary, AB Guild
  • Morgantown Guild
  • Charlottesville Guild
  • Chicago Guild
  • Cincinnati Guild
  • Cleveland Guild
  • Columbia, MO Guild
  • Columbus, OH Guild
  • Dallas Guild
  • Dayton Guild
  • Denver Guild
  • Des Moines Guild
  • Detroit Guild
  • Edmonton, AB Guild
  • Fargo-Valley City Guild
  • Fresno Guild
  • Ft. Worth Guild
  • Gainesville-Tallahassee Guild
  • Grand Rapids Guild
  • Halifax, NS Guild
  • Hamilton, ON Guild
  • Hartford Guild
  • Hershey Guild
  • Hudson Valley Guild
  • Houston Guild
  • Indianapolis Guild
  • Jacksonville Guild
  • Kansas City Guild
  • Knoxville Guild
  • Lansing Guild
  • London, ON Guild
  • Los Angeles Guild
  • Milwaukee / Madison Guild
  • Minneapolis / Twin Cities Guild
  • Montreal / Quebec City Guild
  • Nashville Guild
  • Newark Guild
  • NYC & Long Island Guild
  • Oakland / San Francisco Guild
  • Omaha Guild
  • Orange County Guild
  • Orlando Guild
  • Ottawa, ON Guild
  • Philadelphia Guild
  • Phoenix Guild
  • Pittsburgh Guild
  • Portland, OR Guild
  • Portland, ME Guild
  • Raleigh-Durham Guild
  • Richmond Guild
  • Sacramento Guild
  • Salt Lake City Guild
  • San Antonio Guild
  • San Diego Guild
  • San Juan, PR Guild
  • Saskatchewan Guild
  • Seattle Guild
  • Spokane Guild
  • Springfield-Champaign, IL Guild
  • Springfield, MA Guild
  • St. Louis Guild
  • Tampa / St. Petersburg Guild
  • Toronto, ON Guild
  • Vancouver, BC Guild
  • Washington DC Guild
  • Winnipeg, MB Guild

Categories

  • Broadcasting Toolkit
  • Multimedia Kit
  • Extra Life Guild Tool Kit

Group


Hospital


Location


Why I "Extra Life"


Interests


Twitter


Instagram


Twitch


Mixer


Discord


Blizzard Battletag


Nintendo ID


PSN ID


Steam


Origin


Xbox Gamertag

Found 56 results

  1. Ghost Town Games' Overcooked has proven to be a sneaky indie success story on PC and consoles. Developed by the duo of Phil Duncan and Oli De-Vine, Overcooked became a hit in 2016. The co-op cooking game received acclaim for its humor and the fun cooperative challenge. Now that is all coming to Nintendo Switch later this week on July 27. The Nintendo Switch version of Overcooked, titled Overcooked Special Edition, includes all the DLC released for the PC, PS4, and Xbox One versions as well as featuring the HD rumble features of the Joy-Con controllers. The release will be digital, though a boxed version of Overcooked is planned for the future. Maybe a good game to keep in your back pocket for Game Day? View full article
  2. Ghost Town Games' Overcooked has proven to be a sneaky indie success story on PC and consoles. Developed by the duo of Phil Duncan and Oli De-Vine, Overcooked became a hit in 2016. The co-op cooking game received acclaim for its humor and the fun cooperative challenge. Now that is all coming to Nintendo Switch later this week on July 27. The Nintendo Switch version of Overcooked, titled Overcooked Special Edition, includes all the DLC released for the PC, PS4, and Xbox One versions as well as featuring the HD rumble features of the Joy-Con controllers. The release will be digital, though a boxed version of Overcooked is planned for the future. Maybe a good game to keep in your back pocket for Game Day?
  3. Feature: Review: Rime

    Rime begins with stormy seas, a red scrap of cloth buffeted by the wind whipping through the air, and a young boy washed up on the shores of an island covered in the ruins of a once mighty civilization. Without a word, players assume control of this child and help him to move through this world full of spirits, magic, and ancient technology. In fact, Rime contains not one line of dialogue – Tequila Works communicate their entire narrative through breathtaking visuals and an absolutely astounding score by David Garcia Diaz. Bright colors swirl across the landscape making everything feel alive and vibrant. The use of these popping colors make it all the more potent when the adventure inevitably descends into darkness and mystery. Majestic soundscapes weave an element of vanished magic into the game, as if the music itself was always grasping to reclaim just a little more of the lost glory the island’s ruined spires. The world of Rime is one that has been afflicted by something terrible. Something so destructive that it has shattered the very fabric of the world. This loss permeates every facet of the adventure. Weeping statues and grasping, shade-filled halls lay in the world’s forgotten corners. For every bright, shining moment in the sun, there is one in which the shadows envelop the red-caped protagonist. That ever-present conflict between light and dark? That escalating tension and deepening mystery? Those are the building blocks of every great adventure. The entire presentation readily draws comparisons to the work of Studio Ghibli, a similarity noted in other reviews of Rime. While I think the observation surprisingly apt for the audio-visual elements, Ghibli tends to make their work aimed squarely at children – Rime takes aim at an older crowd. While it can certainly be enjoyed by younger gamers, the themes and payoff will affect more seasoned players on a deeper level. The seemingly overplayed narrative carries an edge that cuts to the bone with loss and love. <a data-cke-saved-href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack" href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack">RiME (Deluxe Soundtrack) by David García Díaz</a> Each step of Rime’s journey presents an obstacle to be overcome, puzzles to be solved, or enemies to defeat. However, Rime isn’t about any one of those aspects on their own. There are some platforming sections, but it isn’t a platformer. Problems beg for solutions, but Rime isn’t a puzzle game. While sometimes enemies do make an appearance, few would ever describe Rime as a game about combat. Instead, Rime places its focus squarely on maintaining a sense of adventure and subtle storytelling. That emphasis on adventure smooths the gameplay experience. Few will need to grab a strategy guide or watch a walkthrough in order to find the solution to a puzzle. The platforming demands little in the way of reflexes. Combat is about as far from hack and slash as one can get; it’s more of a larger, faster puzzle than anything else. One might wonder how Rime manages to remain compelling with its gameplay when enjoyment doesn’t come from reflexive skill. The narrative hook of learning what happened to the island and our protagonist pulls the player relentlessly forward. Lacking any dialogue to explain the situation or internal monologue to learn what kind of a person the protagonist might be, all we learn about him is from what we can see during gameplay – how he chooses to interact with the world. Perhaps most informative interaction comes from the child’s ability to shout, which causes different interactions with objects throughout the world. Sometimes that shout is a call; other times it becomes a humming sing-song of a half remembered song; and as danger mounts it becomes a whimper. That one interaction can show our protagonist cry, laugh, and grieve. But through all those emotions, he continues to move through the world on his journey, leaving much up to the player’s interpretation. Rime certainly doesn’t overstay its welcome. A relatively focused playthrough can make it from beginning to end in about four hours. Tequila Works doesn’t reuse puzzles – though occasionally similar puzzles reappear as character-building moments. The short length works in Rime’s favor and lends itself to multiple playthroughs. Players who love to scour every inch of their game worlds will find a nice challenge in discovering all the knickknacks hidden away (which all serve a narrative purpose as well). There are certain tropes that fledgling story writers are taught to avoid at all costs: Never open a scene with an alarm clock going off; do not include a gunshot followed by a cut to black; and never ever end with the dreaded phrase, “it was all a dream.” The overuse of these storytelling devices drill them into the public consciousness and rendering them clichés. However – and this is one of storytelling’s biggest secrets - a story can use a cliché, provided that it works. For example, a house full of alarm clocks fills the opening of Back to the Future and that works because the movie revolves around our human relationship with time. The film makes appropriate use of the device in a refreshing way - it’s played as a joke that reinforces the central premise of the film - turning it from a cliché back into a trope, and tropes are just tools in a storyteller’s toolbox. In a gaming landscape filled to bursting with indies, many might take a look at Rime and imagine it to be the latest in a long line of Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw dubbed Small Child, Scary World (SCSW) games. Limbo, Ico, Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons, Braid, these games all take similar forms and tackle themes of being alone in an unknowable world that threatens danger at every turn. The storytelling trope of SCSW has certainly proven to be effective, but its overuse threatens to plunge into cliché territory. And while Rime certainly does fit into the same category, it turns the very concept on its head in a way that works beautifully. Conclusion: Some people might have certain expectations as to what Rime will be – Set those expectations aside and to go into it blind. While Rime certainly might seem to have the trappings of indie gaming tropes that are coming closer to cliché, Tequila Works subverts those expectations in a masterful fashion. 2017 has been a fantastic year for video games – so many quality titles, both big and small, have released. It is a testament to Rime’s quality that it stands as the best thing I have played so far amid the AAA giants that have flexed their gaming muscle over the past several months. It conjures up a mythical adventure that sweeps players up in its majesty. Rime expertly plays with emotion like a master pianist would compose a captivating solo. Rime ends on a haunting final note that doesn’t deliver the empowering resolution many might desire, but it leaves the player with something much better: A powerful artistic statement about how beautiful and terrible and lovely and difficult life can be – and how we can all recover from the worst tragedies and find peace. Rime is now available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC - a Switch version is scheduled to release later this year View full article
  4. Review: Rime

    Rime begins with stormy seas, a red scrap of cloth buffeted by the wind whipping through the air, and a young boy washed up on the shores of an island covered in the ruins of a once mighty civilization. Without a word, players assume control of this child and help him to move through this world full of spirits, magic, and ancient technology. In fact, Rime contains not one line of dialogue – Tequila Works communicate their entire narrative through breathtaking visuals and an absolutely astounding score by David Garcia Diaz. Bright colors swirl across the landscape making everything feel alive and vibrant. The use of these popping colors make it all the more potent when the adventure inevitably descends into darkness and mystery. Majestic soundscapes weave an element of vanished magic into the game, as if the music itself was always grasping to reclaim just a little more of the lost glory the island’s ruined spires. The world of Rime is one that has been afflicted by something terrible. Something so destructive that it has shattered the very fabric of the world. This loss permeates every facet of the adventure. Weeping statues and grasping, shade-filled halls lay in the world’s forgotten corners. For every bright, shining moment in the sun, there is one in which the shadows envelop the red-caped protagonist. That ever-present conflict between light and dark? That escalating tension and deepening mystery? Those are the building blocks of every great adventure. The entire presentation readily draws comparisons to the work of Studio Ghibli, a similarity noted in other reviews of Rime. While I think the observation surprisingly apt for the audio-visual elements, Ghibli tends to make their work aimed squarely at children – Rime takes aim at an older crowd. While it can certainly be enjoyed by younger gamers, the themes and payoff will affect more seasoned players on a deeper level. The seemingly overplayed narrative carries an edge that cuts to the bone with loss and love. <a data-cke-saved-href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack" href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack">RiME (Deluxe Soundtrack) by David García Díaz</a> Each step of Rime’s journey presents an obstacle to be overcome, puzzles to be solved, or enemies to defeat. However, Rime isn’t about any one of those aspects on their own. There are some platforming sections, but it isn’t a platformer. Problems beg for solutions, but Rime isn’t a puzzle game. While sometimes enemies do make an appearance, few would ever describe Rime as a game about combat. Instead, Rime places its focus squarely on maintaining a sense of adventure and subtle storytelling. That emphasis on adventure smooths the gameplay experience. Few will need to grab a strategy guide or watch a walkthrough in order to find the solution to a puzzle. The platforming demands little in the way of reflexes. Combat is about as far from hack and slash as one can get; it’s more of a larger, faster puzzle than anything else. One might wonder how Rime manages to remain compelling with its gameplay when enjoyment doesn’t come from reflexive skill. The narrative hook of learning what happened to the island and our protagonist pulls the player relentlessly forward. Lacking any dialogue to explain the situation or internal monologue to learn what kind of a person the protagonist might be, all we learn about him is from what we can see during gameplay – how he chooses to interact with the world. Perhaps most informative interaction comes from the child’s ability to shout, which causes different interactions with objects throughout the world. Sometimes that shout is a call; other times it becomes a humming sing-song of a half remembered song; and as danger mounts it becomes a whimper. That one interaction can show our protagonist cry, laugh, and grieve. But through all those emotions, he continues to move through the world on his journey, leaving much up to the player’s interpretation. Rime certainly doesn’t overstay its welcome. A relatively focused playthrough can make it from beginning to end in about four hours. Tequila Works doesn’t reuse puzzles – though occasionally similar puzzles reappear as character-building moments. The short length works in Rime’s favor and lends itself to multiple playthroughs. Players who love to scour every inch of their game worlds will find a nice challenge in discovering all the knickknacks hidden away (which all serve a narrative purpose as well). There are certain tropes that fledgling story writers are taught to avoid at all costs: Never open a scene with an alarm clock going off; do not include a gunshot followed by a cut to black; and never ever end with the dreaded phrase, “it was all a dream.” The overuse of these storytelling devices drill them into the public consciousness and rendering them clichés. However – and this is one of storytelling’s biggest secrets - a story can use a cliché, provided that it works. For example, a house full of alarm clocks fills the opening of Back to the Future and that works because the movie revolves around our human relationship with time. The film makes appropriate use of the device in a refreshing way - it’s played as a joke that reinforces the central premise of the film - turning it from a cliché back into a trope, and tropes are just tools in a storyteller’s toolbox. In a gaming landscape filled to bursting with indies, many might take a look at Rime and imagine it to be the latest in a long line of Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw dubbed Small Child, Scary World (SCSW) games. Limbo, Ico, Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons, Braid, these games all take similar forms and tackle themes of being alone in an unknowable world that threatens danger at every turn. The storytelling trope of SCSW has certainly proven to be effective, but its overuse threatens to plunge into cliché territory. And while Rime certainly does fit into the same category, it turns the very concept on its head in a way that works beautifully. Conclusion: Some people might have certain expectations as to what Rime will be – Set those expectations aside and to go into it blind. While Rime certainly might seem to have the trappings of indie gaming tropes that are coming closer to cliché, Tequila Works subverts those expectations in a masterful fashion. 2017 has been a fantastic year for video games – so many quality titles, both big and small, have released. It is a testament to Rime’s quality that it stands as the best thing I have played so far amid the AAA giants that have flexed their gaming muscle over the past several months. It conjures up a mythical adventure that sweeps players up in its majesty. Rime expertly plays with emotion like a master pianist would compose a captivating solo. Rime ends on a haunting final note that doesn’t deliver the empowering resolution many might desire, but it leaves the player with something much better: A powerful artistic statement about how beautiful and terrible and lovely and difficult life can be – and how we can all recover from the worst tragedies and find peace. Rime is now available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC - a Switch version is scheduled to release later this year
  5. Konami dropped a slew of new goodies to Super Bomberman R. Update 1.4 brings new mode, costumes, and more to the Switch's explosive multiplayer party game. The patch introduces three new characters themed after Konami game icons: Castlevania's Simon Belmont, Silent Hill's Pyramid Head, and Gradius' Vic Viper. A new Team Battle mode allows to form their own squads and challenge players online. Four new maps arrive in Battle Mode: Plain Floor, Desert Crate, Classic Conveyor Belt, and Panic Factory. Also, two new series of accessories, Snowflake and Item, are now available. The update is live now. You can read the full patch notes here.
  6. Starting July 5, Rocket League will get just a little more schwifty. As a part of the two-year Anniversary Update Rocket League will be getting some new Rick and Morty themed customization items. Players can get the titular characters in antennae form and Mr. Meseeks, Mr. Poopybutthole and a Cromulan will be available as toppers. There will also be a thematic rocket boost and wheels. These items will be free and can be found as a part of common drops for both online and offline matches. Some bad news though. According to the Rocket League site "Szechuan sauce not included." Other updates with the anniversary include a new arena, battle cars, goal explosions, achievements, trophies, soundtrack options and more. The update will also signal the start of season five. What do you think of the Rocket League update lineup? Are you excited for Rick and Morty meets car soccer? View full article
  7. Starting July 5, Rocket League will get just a little more schwifty. As a part of the two-year Anniversary Update Rocket League will be getting some new Rick and Morty themed customization items. Players can get the titular characters in antennae form and Mr. Meseeks, Mr. Poopybutthole and a Cromulan will be available as toppers. There will also be a thematic rocket boost and wheels. These items will be free and can be found as a part of common drops for both online and offline matches. Some bad news though. According to the Rocket League site "Szechuan sauce not included." Other updates with the anniversary include a new arena, battle cars, goal explosions, achievements, trophies, soundtrack options and more. The update will also signal the start of season five. What do you think of the Rocket League update lineup? Are you excited for Rick and Morty meets car soccer?
  8. Xenoblade Chronicles 2 made a big splash during Nintendo's E3 Direct presentation. The direct sequel to the Wii/New 3DS' Xenoblade Chronicles still doesn’t have a specific release date, but fans only have to wait until the fall of this year to get their hands the Switch JRPG epic. The next entry in the Xeno series puts the spotlight on two new protagonists on a journey to a mysterious land known as Elysium. The trailer shows off the expansive world that blends traditional fantasy with science fiction, as well as some of the new faces players will encounter. We also get a glimpses of the flashy combat against the intimidating creatures dominating both land and the skies. Are you looking forward to Xenoblade Chronicles 2? How do you feel about the new art direction, setting, and characters? View full article
  9. Xenoblade Chronicles 2 made a big splash during Nintendo's E3 Direct presentation. The direct sequel to the Wii/New 3DS' Xenoblade Chronicles still doesn’t have a specific release date, but fans only have to wait until the fall of this year to get their hands the Switch JRPG epic. The next entry in the Xeno series puts the spotlight on two new protagonists on a journey to a mysterious land known as Elysium. The trailer shows off the expansive world that blends traditional fantasy with science fiction, as well as some of the new faces players will encounter. We also get a glimpses of the flashy combat against the intimidating creatures dominating both land and the skies. Are you looking forward to Xenoblade Chronicles 2? How do you feel about the new art direction, setting, and characters?
  10. During the Nintendo E3 Conference, Pokémon President Tsunekazu Ishihara revealed that developer Game Freak is working on a "core RPG" Pokémon title for the Switch. There was no release window as Ishihara admitted that he didn't know how long the game would take. News of a new game might be in response to fan's reactions to the June 6 Nintendo Direct that revolved around Pokémon but did not announce a new title. The announcement came alongside an update on the previously announced Pokkén Tournament DX, a remastered Wii U game coming to the Switch. Its release date is set for September 22. Pokkén Tournament DX will have some new content in the form of Pokémon and it will utilize the Switch's controllers for two player combat. The game will be on display at E3, and will be played competitively on June 14 during the Pokken Invitational . View full article
  11. During the Nintendo E3 Conference, Pokémon President Tsunekazu Ishihara revealed that developer Game Freak is working on a "core RPG" Pokémon title for the Switch. There was no release window as Ishihara admitted that he didn't know how long the game would take. News of a new game might be in response to fan's reactions to the June 6 Nintendo Direct that revolved around Pokémon but did not announce a new title. The announcement came alongside an update on the previously announced Pokkén Tournament DX, a remastered Wii U game coming to the Switch. Its release date is set for September 22. Pokkén Tournament DX will have some new content in the form of Pokémon and it will utilize the Switch's controllers for two player combat. The game will be on display at E3, and will be played competitively on June 14 during the Pokken Invitational .
  12. Metroid fans have been clamoring the Metroid Prime universe for years, ever since the days of the Wii, and especially since the series went into weird waters with a competitive multiplayer sports game for the 3DS. Now fans will only have to wait a little longer with the announcement of Metroid Prime 4 for the Nintendo Switch, teased in a brief video during E3’s Nintendo Direct. Nothing else is known about the latest Metroid, but we’re sure Nintendo will have plenty up their sleeves in future announcements. To tide players over, Nintendo announced a separate Metroid game titled Metroid: Samus Returns for the 3DS that releases on September 15 this year. View full article
  13. Metroid Prime 4 Announced at E3

    Metroid fans have been clamoring the Metroid Prime universe for years, ever since the days of the Wii, and especially since the series went into weird waters with a competitive multiplayer sports game for the 3DS. Now fans will only have to wait a little longer with the announcement of Metroid Prime 4 for the Nintendo Switch, teased in a brief video during E3’s Nintendo Direct. Nothing else is known about the latest Metroid, but we’re sure Nintendo will have plenty up their sleeves in future announcements. To tide players over, Nintendo announced a separate Metroid game titled Metroid: Samus Returns for the 3DS that releases on September 15 this year.
  14. With music one would not usually associate with the serious dreary winters of Skyrim, Bethesda released an official look at The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim on the Switch . After reminding viewers of the gorgeous landscapes of the beloved game, a character seemingly out of sync makes an appearance: Link. Or at least Link in his Amiibo form. A hand then appears to tap the Breath of the Wild Link interact with the Switch Screen. Then we hear the oh-so-familiar treasure chest soundbite, and a piece of the Zelda universe is in the world of Elder Scrolls. The player then opens a chest and gains some signature gear, the Master Sword and Link's blue ensemble. We then get a look at the controller capabilities. In a move that embraces Skyrim's core gameplay, each of the controllers represents a weapon in dual-handed combat. Both controllers are used when handling a bow as well. The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim releases for Nintendo Switch this fall. What do you think of Link's gear making an appearance in Skyrim? How do you think the Switch will handle a massive game like Skyrim?
  15. With music one would not usually associate with the serious dreary winters of Skyrim, Bethesda released an official look at The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim on the Switch . After reminding viewers of the gorgeous landscapes of the beloved game, a character seemingly out of sync makes an appearance: Link. Or at least Link in his Amiibo form. A hand then appears to tap the Breath of the Wild Link interact with the Switch Screen. Then we hear the oh-so-familiar treasure chest soundbite, and a piece of the Zelda universe is in the world of Elder Scrolls. The player then opens a chest and gains some signature gear, the Master Sword and Link's blue ensemble. We then get a look at the controller capabilities. In a move that embraces Skyrim's core gameplay, each of the controllers represents a weapon in dual-handed combat. Both controllers are used when handling a bow as well. The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim releases for Nintendo Switch this fall. What do you think of Link's gear making an appearance in Skyrim? How do you think the Switch will handle a massive game like Skyrim? View full article
  16. Bethesda kept things short but sweet during its late night conference on June 12. Many signature titles were revisited and reimagined with some crossover taking place. Bethesda Rolls Out Creation Club Modding Suite - Bethesda announced the launch of a new way to customize its games. Gaming News: VR Versions of Doom and Fallout 4 Are On The Way - See in-game footage for Doom and Fallout 4 in VR. Heroes of Skyrim Expansion Coming To Elder Scrolls Legends - Learn about the update heading to the card game. Dishonored: Death of the Outsider Coming This Fall - See the trailer for the new standalone Dishonored expansion. Skyrim on the Switch Detailed, Link Makes a Cameo - We get a look at Skyrim on the Switch with some familiar items making an appearance. The Evil Within 2 Brings The Scares In Time For Halloween - The Evil Within 2 was announced, see its trailer. Editing Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus Depicts The Horrors of Nazi-Occupied America - Bethesda ended the night with a trailer for a new Wolfenstein title. For all things E3, keep it tuned into Extra Life. And let us know what titles you're excited to hear about.
  17. Bethesda kept things short but sweet during its late night conference on June 12. Many signature titles were revisited and reimagined with some crossover taking place. Bethesda Rolls Out Creation Club Modding Suite - Bethesda announced the launch of a new way to customize its games. Gaming News: VR Versions of Doom and Fallout 4 Are On The Way - See in-game footage for Doom and Fallout 4 in VR. Heroes of Skyrim Expansion Coming To Elder Scrolls Legends - Learn about the update heading to the card game. Dishonored: Death of the Outsider Coming This Fall - See the trailer for the new standalone Dishonored expansion. Skyrim on the Switch Detailed, Link Makes a Cameo - We get a look at Skyrim on the Switch with some familiar items making an appearance. The Evil Within 2 Brings The Scares In Time For Halloween - The Evil Within 2 was announced, see its trailer. Editing Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus Depicts The Horrors of Nazi-Occupied America - Bethesda ended the night with a trailer for a new Wolfenstein title. For all things E3, keep it tuned into Extra Life. And let us know what titles you're excited to hear about. View full article
  18. EA announced details on the Nintendo Switch version of FIFA 18, which is sure to give football fanatics a reason to rejoice outside of home. As expected of the Switch’s unique portability, players can bring FIFA 18 wherever they want by disconnecting it from the home dock. The game reportedly outputs at 1080p when docked and 720p when mobile. Visual performance might take a hit if you prefer to game on the field, but at least it’s nowhere close to the downgrade cross-generation ports of previous sports games entailed. Players can participate in Local Seasons mode across two Switch consoles, in addition to Kick-Off mode, Career, Online Seasons, Tournaments, Women’s International Cup and Skill games. EA also debuted a new gameplay trailer for FIFA 18, although footage largely looks to be from the PlayStation 4 edition of the game, so take any visuals with a grain of salt if you're planning on getting the Switch edition. FIFA 18 is out on September 29 for all major consoles. Where do you plan on hitting the field?
  19. EA announced details on the Nintendo Switch version of FIFA 18, which is sure to give football fanatics a reason to rejoice outside of home. As expected of the Switch’s unique portability, players can bring FIFA 18 wherever they want by disconnecting it from the home dock. The game reportedly outputs at 1080p when docked and 720p when mobile. Visual performance might take a hit if you prefer to game on the field, but at least it’s nowhere close to the downgrade cross-generation ports of previous sports games entailed. Players can participate in Local Seasons mode across two Switch consoles, in addition to Kick-Off mode, Career, Online Seasons, Tournaments, Women’s International Cup and Skill games. EA also debuted a new gameplay trailer for FIFA 18, although footage largely looks to be from the PlayStation 4 edition of the game, so take any visuals with a grain of salt if you're planning on getting the Switch edition. FIFA 18 is out on September 29 for all major consoles. Where do you plan on hitting the field? View full article
  20. Konami dropped a slew of new goodies to Super Bomberman R. Update 1.4 brings new mode, costumes, and more to the Switch's explosive multiplayer party game. The patch introduces three new characters themed after Konami game icons: Castlevania's Simon Belmont, Silent Hill's Pyramid Head, and Gradius' Vic Viper. A new Team Battle mode allows to form their own squads and challenge players online. Four new maps arrive in Battle Mode: Plain Floor, Desert Crate, Classic Conveyor Belt, and Panic Factory. Also, two new series of accessories, Snowflake and Item, are now available. The update is live now. You can read the full patch notes here. View full article
  21. Modern games are fantastic. The internet can fix broken games or give long dead titles new life. There are a myriad of benefits to the way gaming today differs from that of the past. One of the less appreciated benefits is translation and localization, which has brought western audiences a huge number of titles from Japan and vice versa. And because of that exchange of gaming, language has become critical to how many people appreciate titles. For some, there is only one "correct" language in which to enjoy certain games or sometimes a game simply sounds better to some of its players in a different language because of the different voice actors used in the localization process. That's why, despite near universal acclaim, some fans of The The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild were disappointed that its western release didn't include the Japanese language version of the game that some saw in the original trailers. Though there were no gameplay differences, some players truly preferred the way the Japanese version sounded over the English version - many attributing this difference to the quality of the voice acting. A separate camp in the community grew to similarly clamor for the Japanese version, not because they could understand the game better, but specifically because they couldn't understand the vocals. The Legend of Zelda has traditionally avoided voice acting in the series and this small subset of gamers preferred a version of the game that they could enjoy in the same way - even if the language used was real - as long as they couldn't understand and had to rely on subtitles like the older games in the series. Nintendo released a patch for Breath of the Wild today that allows players to turn on Japanese audio for their action-adventure critical darling. Players can find the option in the game's main menu after updating and switch over to Japanese, Spanish, German, or Italian. If you're worried that you will inadvertently switch over all the text, too, never fear! Switching over only affects audio. Hooray for small changes that satisfy niche portions of the gaming populace!
  22. Modern games are fantastic. The internet can fix broken games or give long dead titles new life. There are a myriad of benefits to the way gaming today differs from that of the past. One of the less appreciated benefits is translation and localization, which has brought western audiences a huge number of titles from Japan and vice versa. And because of that exchange of gaming, language has become critical to how many people appreciate titles. For some, there is only one "correct" language in which to enjoy certain games or sometimes a game simply sounds better to some of its players in a different language because of the different voice actors used in the localization process. That's why, despite near universal acclaim, some fans of The The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild were disappointed that its western release didn't include the Japanese language version of the game that some saw in the original trailers. Though there were no gameplay differences, some players truly preferred the way the Japanese version sounded over the English version - many attributing this difference to the quality of the voice acting. A separate camp in the community grew to similarly clamor for the Japanese version, not because they could understand the game better, but specifically because they couldn't understand the vocals. The Legend of Zelda has traditionally avoided voice acting in the series and this small subset of gamers preferred a version of the game that they could enjoy in the same way - even if the language used was real - as long as they couldn't understand and had to rely on subtitles like the older games in the series. Nintendo released a patch for Breath of the Wild today that allows players to turn on Japanese audio for their action-adventure critical darling. Players can find the option in the game's main menu after updating and switch over to Japanese, Spanish, German, or Italian. If you're worried that you will inadvertently switch over all the text, too, never fear! Switching over only affects audio. Hooray for small changes that satisfy niche portions of the gaming populace! View full article
  23. The big N is at it again. During a Nintendo Direct yesterday, Nintendo announced that they would be releasing a new Joy-Con controller variant. No longer will players be confined to grey, red, and blue options for their controller needs. The neon yellow Joy-Cons are sure to add some pizzazz to anyone's console line-up and they are releasing alongside a yellow wrist strap controller add-on that will blend better than the grey wrist straps. Perhaps more importantly, a battery pack will also be coming soon to help extend the battery life of the Joy-Con controllers (though a first party battery pack for the Switch itself like the one we told you about last week doesn't seem to be in the works). Both the yellow Joy-Con and the controller battery packs will be released on June 16, the same day as Nintendo's upcoming boxing game Arms. Also, for those who have been on the lookout for standalone Switch docking units, take heart! More will be released on May 19. Though pricey, these docks have found themselves in high demand from people who want to play their Switch on different televisions. As a result, many retailers have simply sold out. Nintendo, either to artificially inflate demand or because it didn't foresee that so many people might want more than one dock, hasn't released new docking units to retailers. This upcoming shipment should help relieve some of the demand pressure.
  24. The big N is at it again. During a Nintendo Direct yesterday, Nintendo announced that they would be releasing a new Joy-Con controller variant. No longer will players be confined to grey, red, and blue options for their controller needs. The neon yellow Joy-Cons are sure to add some pizzazz to anyone's console line-up and they are releasing alongside a yellow wrist strap controller add-on that will blend better than the grey wrist straps. Perhaps more importantly, a battery pack will also be coming soon to help extend the battery life of the Joy-Con controllers (though a first party battery pack for the Switch itself like the one we told you about last week doesn't seem to be in the works). Both the yellow Joy-Con and the controller battery packs will be released on June 16, the same day as Nintendo's upcoming boxing game Arms. Also, for those who have been on the lookout for standalone Switch docking units, take heart! More will be released on May 19. Though pricey, these docks have found themselves in high demand from people who want to play their Switch on different televisions. As a result, many retailers have simply sold out. Nintendo, either to artificially inflate demand or because it didn't foresee that so many people might want more than one dock, hasn't released new docking units to retailers. This upcoming shipment should help relieve some of the demand pressure. View full article
  25. One of the sticking points that some Switch owners have had with their new console is taking it with them on the go. The battery typically lasts less than three hours after removing the console from its dock, thought that time can be improved by playing less hardware intensive games. The days of those battery woes might be coming to an end with a new accessory developed by UK design company InDemand Design. The device, dubbed the SwitchCharge, latches onto the back of the portable Switch to act as both a case and a portable power source. The battery allows for an additional 10-12 hours of battery life depending on the games being played. In addition to that primary function, SwitchCharge offers an improved kickstand for stability when placed on flat surfaces and slots to carry two additional games while mobile. The SwitchCharge also solves a minor annoyance that has plagued Switch owners since launch: Charging while playing on the go. If all of these things seem great, how can you get your hands on one? InDemand Design has started an Indiegogo campaign to raise $80,000 to jumpstart production on the SwitchCharge. The campaign runs for another month and is currently sitting at around $67,000 a single day into its campaign. Indiegogo backers can get a SwitchCharge for a discounted amount at different reward tiers. Those who wait will have to pay the full $130 retail price. What do you think? Does this device make for a better Switch or does it need more features to sell at $130? View full article