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Found 32 results

  1. If you were a Sega fanatic back in the day and have been searching for an inexpensive (read: free) way to relieve those memories, Sega just might have something for you. Sega Forever, which launched today, is a free collection of classic games for download on iOS and Android devices. The collection's library spans the Master System to the Dreamcast and everything in between. Each title features wireless Bluetooth controller support, leaderboards and saves. The site promises new releases every month, and kicks off with Sonic the Hedgehog, Altered Beast, Phantasy Star II, Comix Zone and Kid Chameleon. While the games are all free, they do contain in-game ads, so the experience certainly comes with that caveat. Players will have to pay a one-time fee of $1.99 in order to dismiss ads from a select game permanently. Game controls from consoles transferred over to mobile devices also aren't always the smoothest, so allowing players to decide if a port is worth $1.99 is probably one of the more consumer-friendly ways of implementing this retro gaming program. You can find out more about Sega Forever by visiting its official website. If you want to experience an insane blast from the past, check out the website's hyper-90's launch trailer. What do you think about Sega Forever? Let us know how you feel about playing your favorite Sega classics on the go! View full article
  2. If you were a Sega fanatic back in the day and have been searching for an inexpensive (read: free) way to relieve those memories, Sega just might have something for you. Sega Forever, which launched today, is a free collection of classic games for download on iOS and Android devices. The collection's library spans the Master System to the Dreamcast and everything in between. Each title features wireless Bluetooth controller support, leaderboards and saves. The site promises new releases every month, and kicks off with Sonic the Hedgehog, Altered Beast, Phantasy Star II, Comix Zone and Kid Chameleon. While the games are all free, they do contain in-game ads, so the experience certainly comes with that caveat. Players will have to pay a one-time fee of $1.99 in order to dismiss ads from a select game permanently. Game controls from consoles transferred over to mobile devices also aren't always the smoothest, so allowing players to decide if a port is worth $1.99 is probably one of the more consumer-friendly ways of implementing this retro gaming program. You can find out more about Sega Forever by visiting its official website. If you want to experience an insane blast from the past, check out the website's hyper-90's launch trailer. What do you think about Sega Forever? Let us know how you feel about playing your favorite Sega classics on the go!
  3. Zipping around Green Hill Zone as the Sega’s flagship hedgehog on my Genesis ranks among my fondest gaming memories. As the quintessential Genesis kid, I bought into Sega’s marketing of Sonic as the embodiment of everything radical about the 90’s as I tried (and failed) to adopt that signature ‘tude into my own life. Thankfully, his games backed that up that advertising hype with well-designed platforming fueled by the hedgehog’s impressive sense of speed. As Sonic sped into the 3D era, his quality and appeal began a steady decline. The 3D-style gameplay introduced in Sonic Adventure never grabbed me the way the side-scrollers did. The rapid introduction of insipid side characters and increasingly convoluted plotlines made me pine for the days when Sonic was just a cool dude protecting his forest from a maniacal scientist. I, like many like-minded Sonic fans, were mystified as to why Sega couldn’t just stick to the winning formula that put Sonic on the map in the first place. But then Sega finally listened. Last summer, the publisher announced Sonic Mania, a game that can be aptly described as “that exact thing you old fogeys used to like but a bit better”. The retro-style throwback is an amalgamation of the best parts of Sonic’s Genesis heyday, and a well-crafted one at that. I got my hands on Sonic Mania during E3, playing through Act 1 of the reimagined Green Hill Zone. Sonic Mania scratched all the right itches: tight, identical controls and physics of the original (something Sonic 4 lacked), a hum-worthy soundtrack of remade tunes, and a nostalgic presentation. It really does play like the titles I obsessed over as a kid. But as I landed the final blow on Robotnik’s Death Egg robot at the demo’s conclusion, I couldn’t shake the sense that these memories felt too familiar. Probably because they more or less are those memories, just remixed with better music. I appreciate Sega greenlighting such a fan-focused passion project, but I can only imagine how much more excited I would be if they pitched the same concept but with entirely fresh content. New stages, never-before-seen enemies, additional power-ups, an original story – all wrapped up in a classic 16-bit package. As much as I enjoy Chemical Plant Zone, I’ve spun up and down its pipes enough to last a lifetime. Take that classic gameplay and apply it to something new, and Sega could have the comeback the hedgehog desperately needs. That’s not to say Sonic Mania won’t be a blast on its own merits. I knew I was going to purchase it the moment it was announced, and playing it for myself solidified that decision. Thus far it’s a fun and accurate throwback to a simpler period in my life. I smiled gleefully throughout the entire demo. However, it's impossible for me to ignore the overwhelming amount of creative potential that was left on the table. I guess I’ll have to wait until the game’s launch on August 15 to see if nostalgia alone is enough to resurrect my ailing childhood hero. View full article
  4. Zipping around Green Hill Zone as the Sega’s flagship hedgehog on my Genesis ranks among my fondest gaming memories. As the quintessential Genesis kid, I bought into Sega’s marketing of Sonic as the embodiment of everything radical about the 90’s as I tried (and failed) to adopt that signature ‘tude into my own life. Thankfully, his games backed that up that advertising hype with well-designed platforming fueled by the hedgehog’s impressive sense of speed. As Sonic sped into the 3D era, his quality and appeal began a steady decline. The 3D-style gameplay introduced in Sonic Adventure never grabbed me the way the side-scrollers did. The rapid introduction of insipid side characters and increasingly convoluted plotlines made me pine for the days when Sonic was just a cool dude protecting his forest from a maniacal scientist. I, like many like-minded Sonic fans, were mystified as to why Sega couldn’t just stick to the winning formula that put Sonic on the map in the first place. But then Sega finally listened. Last summer, the publisher announced Sonic Mania, a game that can be aptly described as “that exact thing you old fogeys used to like but a bit better”. The retro-style throwback is an amalgamation of the best parts of Sonic’s Genesis heyday, and a well-crafted one at that. I got my hands on Sonic Mania during E3, playing through Act 1 of the reimagined Green Hill Zone. Sonic Mania scratched all the right itches: tight, identical controls and physics of the original (something Sonic 4 lacked), a hum-worthy soundtrack of remade tunes, and a nostalgic presentation. It really does play like the titles I obsessed over as a kid. But as I landed the final blow on Robotnik’s Death Egg robot at the demo’s conclusion, I couldn’t shake the sense that these memories felt too familiar. Probably because they more or less are those memories, just remixed with better music. I appreciate Sega greenlighting such a fan-focused passion project, but I can only imagine how much more excited I would be if they pitched the same concept but with entirely fresh content. New stages, never-before-seen enemies, additional power-ups, an original story – all wrapped up in a classic 16-bit package. As much as I enjoy Chemical Plant Zone, I’ve spun up and down its pipes enough to last a lifetime. Take that classic gameplay and apply it to something new, and Sega could have the comeback the hedgehog desperately needs. That’s not to say Sonic Mania won’t be a blast on its own merits. I knew I was going to purchase it the moment it was announced, and playing it for myself solidified that decision. Thus far it’s a fun and accurate throwback to a simpler period in my life. I smiled gleefully throughout the entire demo. However, it's impossible for me to ignore the overwhelming amount of creative potential that was left on the table. I guess I’ll have to wait until the game’s launch on August 15 to see if nostalgia alone is enough to resurrect my ailing childhood hero.
  5. Sega Europe is teaming up with a new studio headed by Gary Carr and Mark Webley, who you might recognize for their work on games like Black & White, Theme Park, and Fable. Sega's European branch will be working with the duo's Two Point Studios to create an entirely new IP that will modernize the soul of what made the franchises they worked on great. The game, currently unnamed, but in development, impressed Sega. John Clark, the senior VP of commercial publishing at Sega Europe, stated that, "We've been talking to Two Point Studios for a long time and are really impressed with their vision. We're delighted to announce our partnership and look forward to revealing more about the project early next year." Likewise, Sega dazzled the indie studio with Webley explaining that, "Sega Europe have really impressed us with their approach to working with creative teams, their reputation as a PC publisher and their commitment to quality - they are an ideal partner for us." While not much is currently known about the unannounced title, Carr and Webley's team at Two Point Studios consists mainly of ex-Bullfrog and ex-Lionhead developers. Gary Carr did drop a hint at what type of game might be in the works, saying, "We are really excited to be working with Sega and between us we feel confident that we can create something special, and realise our vision of crafting a beautiful, charming and challenging sim game." Challenging sim game, huh? That statement, along with the personnel involved, points us toward what the experienced team at Two Point might be making. Black & White: Theme Park, anyone? Become a god of life or death, lording over a digital theme par- wait, no, that's what people already do in theme park games. Whatever this unannounced game winds up becoming, we will have more details about it in early 2018. View full article
  6. Sega Europe is teaming up with a new studio headed by Gary Carr and Mark Webley, who you might recognize for their work on games like Black & White, Theme Park, and Fable. Sega's European branch will be working with the duo's Two Point Studios to create an entirely new IP that will modernize the soul of what made the franchises they worked on great. The game, currently unnamed, but in development, impressed Sega. John Clark, the senior VP of commercial publishing at Sega Europe, stated that, "We've been talking to Two Point Studios for a long time and are really impressed with their vision. We're delighted to announce our partnership and look forward to revealing more about the project early next year." Likewise, Sega dazzled the indie studio with Webley explaining that, "Sega Europe have really impressed us with their approach to working with creative teams, their reputation as a PC publisher and their commitment to quality - they are an ideal partner for us." While not much is currently known about the unannounced title, Carr and Webley's team at Two Point Studios consists mainly of ex-Bullfrog and ex-Lionhead developers. Gary Carr did drop a hint at what type of game might be in the works, saying, "We are really excited to be working with Sega and between us we feel confident that we can create something special, and realise our vision of crafting a beautiful, charming and challenging sim game." Challenging sim game, huh? That statement, along with the personnel involved, points us toward what the experienced team at Two Point might be making. Black & White: Theme Park, anyone? Become a god of life or death, lording over a digital theme par- wait, no, that's what people already do in theme park games. Whatever this unannounced game winds up becoming, we will have more details about it in early 2018.
  7. You'll get a lot, and I mean A LOT, of different answers if you ask a group of gamers about the best Sonic the Hedgehog game. Some are die-hard supporters of 3D-era Sonic, some will swear by the 3D Sonic Revival that happened after Sonic 2006, and some maintain that there were never any good Sonic the Hedgehog games at all (an opinion that might start some flame wars in certain corners of the internet). However, if there is one thing that most people can agree on it is that Sonic's best streak of games was found on the Sega Genesis. Sonic Mania pursues that ear of nostalgia perfectly in the trailer released today. The trailer features animation work done by Tyson Hesse, the artist and author of the comic Diesel. The music comes courtesy of the YouTube channel Hyper Potions. Together with Sega, Hesse and Hyper Potions managed to really capture a the retro feel of the franchise while covering it in a new coat of paint. Oh, and Sonic Mania will be returning to the franchise's Sega Genesis roots with 2D platforming. Players will be able to play as Sonic, Tails, and Knuckles that brings fans all new levels, reimagined versions of classic stages, and boss battles. I mean, look at that trailer! It definitely left me smiling. Sonic Mania releases on August 15 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. Fans can also nab a Collector's Edition of the game that comes with a Sonic/console statue, a faux cartridge with a golden ring, and a big, ol' box. The old timey commercial Sega put together to advertise it is pretty funny, so check that out below. View full article
  8. You'll get a lot, and I mean A LOT, of different answers if you ask a group of gamers about the best Sonic the Hedgehog game. Some are die-hard supporters of 3D-era Sonic, some will swear by the 3D Sonic Revival that happened after Sonic 2006, and some maintain that there were never any good Sonic the Hedgehog games at all (an opinion that might start some flame wars in certain corners of the internet). However, if there is one thing that most people can agree on it is that Sonic's best streak of games was found on the Sega Genesis. Sonic Mania pursues that ear of nostalgia perfectly in the trailer released today. The trailer features animation work done by Tyson Hesse, the artist and author of the comic Diesel. The music comes courtesy of the YouTube channel Hyper Potions. Together with Sega, Hesse and Hyper Potions managed to really capture a the retro feel of the franchise while covering it in a new coat of paint. Oh, and Sonic Mania will be returning to the franchise's Sega Genesis roots with 2D platforming. Players will be able to play as Sonic, Tails, and Knuckles that brings fans all new levels, reimagined versions of classic stages, and boss battles. I mean, look at that trailer! It definitely left me smiling. Sonic Mania releases on August 15 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC. Fans can also nab a Collector's Edition of the game that comes with a Sonic/console statue, a faux cartridge with a golden ring, and a big, ol' box. The old timey commercial Sega put together to advertise it is pretty funny, so check that out below.
  9. Soulcalibur released for the Sega Dreamcast as part of the console's North American launch in 1999. Developed by Project Soul, the fighting title served as a successor to Soul Blade on the PlayStation. Two versions of Soulcalibur were developed - one for arcades and one for the Dreamcast. Though the arcade version launched in 1998, the Dreamcast version contained numerous improvements and additional game modes while offering graphics and animations on the same level as the arcade version - something almost unheard of in 3D gaming before the turn of the millennium. Harold Goldberg, prolific video game writer, author of All Your Base Are Belong to Us: How 50 Years of Videogames Conquered Pop Culture, and founder of The New York Videogame Critics Circle, joins the show this week to defend his nomination of Soulcalibur. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Soul Blade 'Jazzer Soul' by MkVaff (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR00194) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  10. Soulcalibur released for the Sega Dreamcast as part of the console's North American launch in 1999. Developed by Project Soul, the fighting title served as a successor to Soul Blade on the PlayStation. Two versions of Soulcalibur were developed - one for arcades and one for the Dreamcast. Though the arcade version launched in 1998, the Dreamcast version contained numerous improvements and additional game modes while offering graphics and animations on the same level as the arcade version - something almost unheard of in 3D gaming before the turn of the millennium. Harold Goldberg, prolific video game writer, author of All Your Base Are Belong to Us: How 50 Years of Videogames Conquered Pop Culture, and founder of The New York Videogame Critics Circle, joins the show this week to defend his nomination of Soulcalibur. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Soul Blade 'Jazzer Soul' by MkVaff (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR00194) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  11. A couple years back, we told you about how the Internet Archive had added 2,400 MS-DOS games to its collection. That number of MS-DOS titles has since grown to over 4,000, but there are actually almost double that number of gaming titles that archived from other systems and consoles. The current total number of explorable gaming software on the Archive stands at 7,700. That's a lot of games! The console collection of The Internet Archive includes a staggering number of obscure systems. Ever wondered what it was like to play a Fairchild Channel F? They have 45 games anyone can try out. Never heard of the Epoch Game Pocket Computer? You can play five of those titles. In fact, there are 27 collections of uploaded and emulated software available, including over 1,500 Sega games across four of their consoles. Below you can find a comprehensive list of the consoles, the number of games in the collection, and links to their related collections on Internet Archive: Amstrad GX-4000 - 23 APF-MP1000 - 15 Atari 2600 - 519 Atari 5200 - 43 Atari 7800 – 73 Bally Astrocade - 20 Bandai Super Vision 8000 - 7 Coleco Colecovision - 234 Emerson Arcadia – 58 Entex Adventure Vision - 4 Epoch Game Pocket Computer - 5 Epoch Super Cassette Vision - 31 The Fairchild Channel F – 45 Magnavox Odyssey 2 – 122 Mattel Aquarius - 13 Mattel Intelevision - 21 Mega Duck WG-108 - 9 Neo Geo Pocket/Pocket Color – 316 Sega Game Gear - 446 Sega Genesis - 575 Sega Master System - 563 Sega SG-1000 - 74 Socrates - 8 Shoot ‘Em Up Construction Kit games - 323 Super A’Can – 9 VTech Creativision - 17 Watara Supervision - 44 However, are all of those games worth looking into? That answer is definitely a bit hazy. While Internet Archive can successfully emulate all of these titles, the controls and responsiveness of said games leaves a lot to be desired. The ideal way to play these is definitely not on the Archive, but it stands as a useful repository of history and research for those who want to know more about gaming's past. The uploaded titles include unfinished prototypes and builds for various games, too! Just be warned - there are a lot of... eccentric titles on the Internet Archive that have been made by homebrew developers and may contain some explicit material. View full article
  12. A couple years back, we told you about how the Internet Archive had added 2,400 MS-DOS games to its collection. That number of MS-DOS titles has since grown to over 4,000, but there are actually almost double that number of gaming titles that archived from other systems and consoles. The current total number of explorable gaming software on the Archive stands at 7,700. That's a lot of games! The console collection of The Internet Archive includes a staggering number of obscure systems. Ever wondered what it was like to play a Fairchild Channel F? They have 45 games anyone can try out. Never heard of the Epoch Game Pocket Computer? You can play five of those titles. In fact, there are 27 collections of uploaded and emulated software available, including over 1,500 Sega games across four of their consoles. Below you can find a comprehensive list of the consoles, the number of games in the collection, and links to their related collections on Internet Archive: Amstrad GX-4000 - 23 APF-MP1000 - 15 Atari 2600 - 519 Atari 5200 - 43 Atari 7800 – 73 Bally Astrocade - 20 Bandai Super Vision 8000 - 7 Coleco Colecovision - 234 Emerson Arcadia – 58 Entex Adventure Vision - 4 Epoch Game Pocket Computer - 5 Epoch Super Cassette Vision - 31 The Fairchild Channel F – 45 Magnavox Odyssey 2 – 122 Mattel Aquarius - 13 Mattel Intelevision - 21 Mega Duck WG-108 - 9 Neo Geo Pocket/Pocket Color – 316 Sega Game Gear - 446 Sega Genesis - 575 Sega Master System - 563 Sega SG-1000 - 74 Socrates - 8 Shoot ‘Em Up Construction Kit games - 323 Super A’Can – 9 VTech Creativision - 17 Watara Supervision - 44 However, are all of those games worth looking into? That answer is definitely a bit hazy. While Internet Archive can successfully emulate all of these titles, the controls and responsiveness of said games leaves a lot to be desired. The ideal way to play these is definitely not on the Archive, but it stands as a useful repository of history and research for those who want to know more about gaming's past. The uploaded titles include unfinished prototypes and builds for various games, too! Just be warned - there are a lot of... eccentric titles on the Internet Archive that have been made by homebrew developers and may contain some explicit material.
  13. The folks at Lizardcube release their side-scrolling action-platformer Wonder Boy today. The vibrant, dream-like game follows the either Hu-Man or Hu-Girl as he/she ventures into Monster Land in search of the dragon's room. Unfortunately for our hero, the room isn't without its traps. The dragon curses Wonder Boy, dooming him to live in various animal-human forms. The trailer shows these forms in action: Lizard-Man, Mouse-Man, Lion-Man, Piranha-Man, and Hawk-Man. Each one has different advantages, like a fire breath attack as Lizard-Man or the ability to fly as Hawk-Man. Players will need to master each form in order to recover the Salamander Cross and remove the curse for good. As a nice added bonus, players can switch back and forth from the modern, hand-animated style or a retro 8-bit aesthetic. These changes can be made on the fly and even extend to the audio and sound effects. Wonder Boy is an old Sega franchise that had some of the strangest numbering and naming conventions, even by gaming standards. The series goes Wonder Boy, Wonder Boy: Monster Land, Wonder Boy III: Monster Lair, Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap, Wonder Boy V: Monster World III, and Monster World IV. Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap is a modern reimagining of the 1989 Sega Master System title Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap for modern consoles and possibly an attempt to revive the dormant Wonder Boy IP for a new era. Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap is available now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch View full article
  14. The folks at Lizardcube release their side-scrolling action-platformer Wonder Boy today. The vibrant, dream-like game follows the either Hu-Man or Hu-Girl as he/she ventures into Monster Land in search of the dragon's room. Unfortunately for our hero, the room isn't without its traps. The dragon curses Wonder Boy, dooming him to live in various animal-human forms. The trailer shows these forms in action: Lizard-Man, Mouse-Man, Lion-Man, Piranha-Man, and Hawk-Man. Each one has different advantages, like a fire breath attack as Lizard-Man or the ability to fly as Hawk-Man. Players will need to master each form in order to recover the Salamander Cross and remove the curse for good. As a nice added bonus, players can switch back and forth from the modern, hand-animated style or a retro 8-bit aesthetic. These changes can be made on the fly and even extend to the audio and sound effects. Wonder Boy is an old Sega franchise that had some of the strangest numbering and naming conventions, even by gaming standards. The series goes Wonder Boy, Wonder Boy: Monster Land, Wonder Boy III: Monster Lair, Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap, Wonder Boy V: Monster World III, and Monster World IV. Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap is a modern reimagining of the 1989 Sega Master System title Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap for modern consoles and possibly an attempt to revive the dormant Wonder Boy IP for a new era. Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap is available now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch
  15. Sega's Humble Bundle Is Massive

    This week's Humble Bundle is one of the best deals on video games that you will ever see. There are very few things in life that are better than being able to pay what you want for four games. One of those things is paying what you want for four games and knowing that some of that money is going to a good cause. The Humble Bundle from Sega is made up of Alpha Protocol, Company of Heroes, Rome: Total War, and Hell Yeah! Wrath of the Dead Rabbit. "But wait," you say, "this article claimed the bundle was massive. That's only four games!" Ho ho, so the article did, discerning reader! If you pay more than $5.99 you also receive Typing of the Dead: Overkill, Binary Domain, Renegade Ops, Sega Genesis Classics, and Medieval II: Total War and if you pay over $14.99 you'll also get Total War: Shogun II. That's ten games (most of them critically well-received) for a mere $15. Of course, people can always pay more than that, but this is cause for the frugal of the video game world to rejoice. If any of these games seem appealing, head over to Humble Bundle and pay what you'd like!
  16. Today in a streamed Nintendo Direct, Nintendo’s Satoru Iwata was pleased to unveil a business partnership with former rival Sega. Cementing this new connection was the revelation of a new Sonic title called Sonic Lost World for WiiU and 3DS, a new WiiU Mario & Sonic at the Olympics title for this year’s Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, and the announcement that the Nintendo E-Shop would soon be selling Sega GameGear titles. From that starting point, the Direct broadcast went on to divulge more information on various upcoming titles. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages will be sold via the E-Shop beginning May 30 for $5.99 each, but will be on sale for first month for 4.99 apiece. A couple minutes were devoted to discussing Mario and Donkey Kong Minis on the Move’s level creator and level sharing systems. Nintendo also announced a video series on Animal Crossing: New Leaf. The new Animal Crossing releases on June 9. More info was shared on Game and Wario (something involving creatures called… Fronks). The latest WiiU Wario title will retail at a $39.99 price point on June 23. In a surprise move, Nintendo also announced that New Super Luigi U, previously DLC only for New Super Mario Bros. U, would also be receiving a standalone retail version. The DLC content will be priced at $19.99, while the version available in stores will be $29.99. Also showcased was the addition of a new character called Nabbit, who will help ease the difficulty of the title for less experienced players. Iwata also hinted at upcoming info for the mysterious Platinum Games title The Wonderful 101, which will be released September 15. Reggie Fils-Aime, president and COO of Nintendo of America, concluded the Nintendo Direct by revealing that during the week of E3, people will be able to play select unreleased WiiU titles at Best Buy stores. You can view the full Nintendo Direct broadcast below.
  17. Back in the mists of the year 2000, Sega and Overworks released a game for the Dreamcast called Skies of Arcadia. The title made a name for itself as one of the finest RPGs available on the system - some people even argued that it was one of the best games made for the Dreamcast period. In fact, there was so much buzz around the game that it was ported to the Nintendo GameCube three years later. Jack makes the argument that, in either form, it's well worth playing - provided you can track down an elusive copy of the swashbuckling sky pirate game. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Sonic Advance 'The Glacier's Peak' by jmr (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02370) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes (consider leaving a review!). A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  18. Back in the mists of the year 2000, Sega and Overworks released a game for the Dreamcast called Skies of Arcadia. The title made a name for itself as one of the finest RPGs available on the system - some people even argued that it was one of the best games made for the Dreamcast period. In fact, there was so much buzz around the game that it was ported to the Nintendo GameCube three years later. Jack makes the argument that, in either form, it's well worth playing - provided you can track down an elusive copy of the swashbuckling sky pirate game. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Sonic Advance 'The Glacier's Peak' by jmr (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02370) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes (consider leaving a review!). A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  19. There's a brand new translation out for a game Hideo Kojima wrote and directed all the way back in 1994. Policenauts released for the PC-9821 over two decades ago and was remade for the 3DO in 1995 before migrating to the PlayStation and Sega Saturn in 1996. The Konami title was never released outside of Japan and might have remained unknown to Western audiences if not for the surprise release of an unofficial fan translation released in 2009 in honor of Kojima's 49th birthday. Policenauts tells the story of Jonathan Ingram, one of the five police astronauts who have been assigned to, Beyond Coast, the first functional human space colony. After a disastrous incident that leaves him cryogenically frozen in space for almost a quarter of a century, Ingrambecomes a private investigator on Earth until an encounter with his ex-wife who implores him to travel back to Beyond Coast and unravel the mysteries of her new husband's disappearance. While it's certainly some hardboiled sci-fi, the meat and potatoes of Kojima's work for the better part of two decades, Policenauts seems practically restrained and restful compared to the completely bonkers twists and turns of the Metal Gear Solid franchise. So, if there was already an unofficial translation released seven years ago, what's with the headline? The 2009 translation was for the version of Policenauts that released on the original PlayStation. However, Policenauts on the Sega Saturn has become what many fans of the game consider to be the definitive iteration of the title. It includes additional scenes and extras not seen in the PlayStation version, as well as boasting higher quality pixel art. The newest fan translation from this year covers the Saturn version's extras. You can find both the PS1 and Saturn translations on the Policenaut's community page. For those looking to play the translations, there's some bad news. It's a bit tricky. Luckily, the translators recognized this and include some streamlined instructions and multiple options for those who might be moving into uncharted territory to apply the translation patches. Unlike recent fan-made games that have been cancelled, these translations do not include distribution of Policenauts itself. If you want to experience some early Kojima, or just want to scratch the nostalgia itch for a solid point-and-click experience, consider checking out Policenauts.
  20. There's a brand new translation out for a game Hideo Kojima wrote and directed all the way back in 1994. Policenauts released for the PC-9821 over two decades ago and was remade for the 3DO in 1995 before migrating to the PlayStation and Sega Saturn in 1996. The Konami title was never released outside of Japan and might have remained unknown to Western audiences if not for the surprise release of an unofficial fan translation released in 2009 in honor of Kojima's 49th birthday. Policenauts tells the story of Jonathan Ingram, one of the five police astronauts who have been assigned to, Beyond Coast, the first functional human space colony. After a disastrous incident that leaves him cryogenically frozen in space for almost a quarter of a century, Ingrambecomes a private investigator on Earth until an encounter with his ex-wife who implores him to travel back to Beyond Coast and unravel the mysteries of her new husband's disappearance. While it's certainly some hardboiled sci-fi, the meat and potatoes of Kojima's work for the better part of two decades, Policenauts seems practically restrained and restful compared to the completely bonkers twists and turns of the Metal Gear Solid franchise. So, if there was already an unofficial translation released seven years ago, what's with the headline? The 2009 translation was for the version of Policenauts that released on the original PlayStation. However, Policenauts on the Sega Saturn has become what many fans of the game consider to be the definitive iteration of the title. It includes additional scenes and extras not seen in the PlayStation version, as well as boasting higher quality pixel art. The newest fan translation from this year covers the Saturn version's extras. You can find both the PS1 and Saturn translations on the Policenaut's community page. For those looking to play the translations, there's some bad news. It's a bit tricky. Luckily, the translators recognized this and include some streamlined instructions and multiple options for those who might be moving into uncharted territory to apply the translation patches. Unlike recent fan-made games that have been cancelled, these translations do not include distribution of Policenauts itself. If you want to experience some early Kojima, or just want to scratch the nostalgia itch for a solid point-and-click experience, consider checking out Policenauts. View full article
  21. Many thought the Nintendo-Sega rivalry was long dead, but this holiday season the specter of that old conflict will rise from the ashes. While Nintendo announced a new mini NES that will be hitting store shelves this holiday season, Sega has announced a Genesis mini-console as well as a portable Genesis. While many welcomed the news of a retro Nintendo box and threw money at their screens, some had a few valid complaints. Nintendo's miniature NES will be a digital only box, limited to 30 pre-installed titles with no slot to play physical copies of retro games. On top of that, it does not include an SD slot, access to the virtual console's digital library, and comes with only one controller. In comparison, Sega will be pre-installing 80 titles onto both the mini-console and the handheld. The console will even include a slot to play old Genesis titles that might not be included in the 80 game roster. Both the console and the handheld will have SD card slots, too. It will also come with two wireless Genesis controllers and support for the original controllers. However, it is notable that the console lacks an HDMI connection, which could prove frustrating by creating a small degree of input lag, and the wireless controllers rely on infrared technology which hasn't historically been kind to controllers. Sega's console manufacturing isn't quite what it used to be, so the console and handheld manufacturing are being handled by AtGames. AtGames is best known for dominating the Plug 'n Play niche of the gaming industry and is striving to bring the niche more credibility than it has had in the past. Below you can see the entire line-up of games for Sega's new-old consoles. Half are classics and half are labelled as "Sega Arcade/Puzzle games" and might be lesser known to those who haven't had extensive experience with the Genesis. Classics: Alex Kidd in the Enchanted Castle Alien Storm Altered Beast Arrow Flash Bonanza Bros. Chakan: The Forever Man Columns Columns III ComixZone Crack Down DecapAttack Dr. Robotnik’sMean Bean Machine ESWAT: City Under Siege Eternal Champions Fatal Labyrinth Flicky Gain Ground Golden Axe Golden Axe II Golden Axe III Jewel Master Kid Chameleon Mortal Kombat I Mortal Kombat II Mortal Kombat III Phantasy Star 2 Phantasy Star 3 Ristar Shadow Dancer: The Secret of Shinobi Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master Sonic & Knuckles Sonic Spinball Sonic the Hedgehog Sonic the Hedgehog II Sonic 3D Blast Sword of Varmilion The Ooze Vectorman Vectorman II Sega Arcade/Puzzle games: Adventure in the Park Cross the road Jack’s Pea Jewel Magic Curling 2010 Plumbing Contest Wall-Breaking Bubble Master Break a Fireline Mahjong Solitaire Warehouse Keeper Chess Memory Snake Air Hockey Spider Naval Power Mr. Balls Cannon Fight or Lose Bottle Taps Race Bomber Checker Hexagonos Whack-A-Wolf Mirror Mirror Panic Lift Black Sheep Flash Memory Brain Switch Mega Brain Switch Hidden Agenda Dominant Amber Hide and Seek Jura Formula Lost World Sudoku Meatloaf Rotation Mya Master Mind Skeleton Scale T-Rex Memory Match Yawning Triceratops Labelled as the Sega MegaDrive/Genesis Ultimate Retro Games Console - 25th Sonic the Hedgehog Anniversary Edition, the console and handheld both retail for about $65 and can currently be pre-ordered from select retailers. There are definite trade-offs between Nintendo and Sega's mini devices. Those looking for a prime nostalgia trip or interesting gift this holiday season now have to relive the old dilemma once again: Nintendo or Sega?
  22. Many thought the Nintendo-Sega rivalry was long dead, but this holiday season the specter of that old conflict will rise from the ashes. While Nintendo announced a new mini NES that will be hitting store shelves this holiday season, Sega has announced a Genesis mini-console as well as a portable Genesis. While many welcomed the news of a retro Nintendo box and threw money at their screens, some had a few valid complaints. Nintendo's miniature NES will be a digital only box, limited to 30 pre-installed titles with no slot to play physical copies of retro games. On top of that, it does not include an SD slot, access to the virtual console's digital library, and comes with only one controller. In comparison, Sega will be pre-installing 80 titles onto both the mini-console and the handheld. The console will even include a slot to play old Genesis titles that might not be included in the 80 game roster. Both the console and the handheld will have SD card slots, too. It will also come with two wireless Genesis controllers and support for the original controllers. However, it is notable that the console lacks an HDMI connection, which could prove frustrating by creating a small degree of input lag, and the wireless controllers rely on infrared technology which hasn't historically been kind to controllers. Sega's console manufacturing isn't quite what it used to be, so the console and handheld manufacturing are being handled by AtGames. AtGames is best known for dominating the Plug 'n Play niche of the gaming industry and is striving to bring the niche more credibility than it has had in the past. Below you can see the entire line-up of games for Sega's new-old consoles. Half are classics and half are labelled as "Sega Arcade/Puzzle games" and might be lesser known to those who haven't had extensive experience with the Genesis. Classics: Alex Kidd in the Enchanted Castle Alien Storm Altered Beast Arrow Flash Bonanza Bros. Chakan: The Forever Man Columns Columns III ComixZone Crack Down DecapAttack Dr. Robotnik’sMean Bean Machine ESWAT: City Under Siege Eternal Champions Fatal Labyrinth Flicky Gain Ground Golden Axe Golden Axe II Golden Axe III Jewel Master Kid Chameleon Mortal Kombat I Mortal Kombat II Mortal Kombat III Phantasy Star 2 Phantasy Star 3 Ristar Shadow Dancer: The Secret of Shinobi Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master Sonic & Knuckles Sonic Spinball Sonic the Hedgehog Sonic the Hedgehog II Sonic 3D Blast Sword of Varmilion The Ooze Vectorman Vectorman II Sega Arcade/Puzzle games: Adventure in the Park Cross the road Jack’s Pea Jewel Magic Curling 2010 Plumbing Contest Wall-Breaking Bubble Master Break a Fireline Mahjong Solitaire Warehouse Keeper Chess Memory Snake Air Hockey Spider Naval Power Mr. Balls Cannon Fight or Lose Bottle Taps Race Bomber Checker Hexagonos Whack-A-Wolf Mirror Mirror Panic Lift Black Sheep Flash Memory Brain Switch Mega Brain Switch Hidden Agenda Dominant Amber Hide and Seek Jura Formula Lost World Sudoku Meatloaf Rotation Mya Master Mind Skeleton Scale T-Rex Memory Match Yawning Triceratops Labelled as the Sega MegaDrive/Genesis Ultimate Retro Games Console - 25th Sonic the Hedgehog Anniversary Edition, the console and handheld both retail for about $65 and can currently be pre-ordered from select retailers. There are definite trade-offs between Nintendo and Sega's mini devices. Those looking for a prime nostalgia trip or interesting gift this holiday season now have to relive the old dilemma once again: Nintendo or Sega? View full article
  23. Favorite Old School RPG??

    Hey guys! I was wondering what some of your favorite old school rpgs are??? Lets say anything ps1 and older! Mine are: Chrono trigger, lunar silver star story complete, legend of dragoon, shining force and a few others!!!
  24. Sega is releasing a free update via Steam to all of its Mega Drive and Genesis titles that creates a new virtual hub that collects over 50 classic titles in one digital room. The hub recreates an early 90s bedroom complete with dynamic time-of-day conditions, Sega-themed decorations, a CRT TV, and a shelf that holds all your Sega Mega Drive and Genesis titles. Not only that, but the hub update brings some long desired features to these classic titles. Sega's retro titles will feature spot-on emulation, local co-op for games that originally supported it, options for graphical enhancements, the ability to save any time, and full controller and keyboard support. The full list of supported games can be found on Sega's announcement, but some of the highlights are Golden Axe, Altered Beast, Ecco the Dolphin, Virtua Fighter 2, Shining Force, Gunstar Heroes, Phantasy Star II-IV, Sonic the Hedgehog 1-3, and many more. Perhaps most importantly, Sega will be integrating full Steam Workshop support to allow for open modding of its retro titles. Honestly, we can't wait to see what the modding community will do with support from Sega like this! The update hits this Thursday, April 28.
  25. Sega is releasing a free update via Steam to all of its Mega Drive and Genesis titles that creates a new virtual hub that collects over 50 classic titles in one digital room. The hub recreates an early 90s bedroom complete with dynamic time-of-day conditions, Sega-themed decorations, a CRT TV, and a shelf that holds all your Sega Mega Drive and Genesis titles. Not only that, but the hub update brings some long desired features to these classic titles. Sega's retro titles will feature spot-on emulation, local co-op for games that originally supported it, options for graphical enhancements, the ability to save any time, and full controller and keyboard support. The full list of supported games can be found on Sega's announcement, but some of the highlights are Golden Axe, Altered Beast, Ecco the Dolphin, Virtua Fighter 2, Shining Force, Gunstar Heroes, Phantasy Star II-IV, Sonic the Hedgehog 1-3, and many more. Perhaps most importantly, Sega will be integrating full Steam Workshop support to allow for open modding of its retro titles. Honestly, we can't wait to see what the modding community will do with support from Sega like this! The update hits this Thursday, April 28. View full article