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Found 35 results

  1. Gaming News:Review: Slime-San

    Indie retro platformers are a dime a dozen in 2017. Since the success of Super Meat Boy in 2010, the independent scene has become cluttered with also-ran, ultra-challenging, quirky platformers of the 8-bit variety. As an ultra-challenging, quirky platformer of the 8-bit variety, Slime-San, from developer Fabraz and publisher Headup Games, will likely fall squarely into that also-ran category, to no fault of its own. Slime-San’s titular protagonist finds himself trapped inside a worm. The reasons are unknown, but probably have something to do with the fact that it’s… ya know, a slime. Inside the worm, an entire community of slimes has developed, with NPC’s offering up quirky flavor text and gameplay modifications. Everyone seems to have resigned themselves to their fate, eternally trapped inside this volatile invertebrate, but not Slime-San. He’s going to get out, and he’s going to free everyone else in the process. Slime-San’s amusing story, but silly story made me laugh more than a handful of times. Slime-San is a fine example of what has made the platformer genre so enduring even three decades after Mario first bounced off a goomba’s head. The platforming presents an intense dance of thumbs and reflexes as each level tests your ability to flip back and forth between the numerous pitfalls and traps in each stage. Those obstacles range from enemies that chase you around the level, to lasers that rise and fall in tandem, to an ever-present red slime that acts as a timer lending some more tension to each stage. The environments inside the giant worm in which Slime-San is trapped, mainly consist of green and red surfaces. You can bounce and climb up green surfaces, while red surfaces will kill your gungy, little protagonist. You can slow time to pass through green surfaces or perform a quick forward dash to more easily maneuver through the game’s many obstacles. These abilities are key to Slime-San’s mobility, which feels tight and joyful, always keeping you on your toes without becoming too frustrating. This is greatly aided by the game’s generous checkpoint system. Death in Slime-San serves as a lesson in how to avoid it on the next run through a level, rather than a frustrating penalty. That’s not to say Slime-San avoids frustration altogether. As the game progresses, new concepts and obstacles are introduced at a steady drip. While some effectively enhance the challenge, others detract from what Slime-San does well. There are a number of puzzle levels that, when combined with the game’s already perplexing platforming sequences, serve to slow things down and create a repetitive loop that often tested my patience to its breaking point. In addition, underwater levels show up more often that they should, which is to say they should’ve been nixed completely. The underwater stages simply don’t play to Slime-San’s strengths, slowing Slime-San’s movement speed to a crawl and evoking the feeling of swimming through a bowl of Jell-O rather than zipping around tightly designed corridors. At times like this, Slime-San’s creativity undermines its tight, smooth game design. Slime-San’s best moments are challenges that require unimpeachable control, precise timing, and speed. Slime-San is designed for forward momentum, and each one-screen stage lays out where you need to go right from the beginning, so all you need to do is figure out how to get there and the quickest route to take. Boss fights break up the challenges nicely, allowing you to experiment with different techniques to take down each beast. These fights test your skills to the max, but they’re also a lot of fun. I only wish there were more of them. My biggest issue with Slime-San relates directly to the platform I played it on. The Nintendo Switch Joy-Con controllers were not designed well for someone with large hands, and playing Slime-San exasperates that problem. The game demands precise timing and thumb-work, but the Joy-Cons can’t accommodate that for someone like myself. Whereas I find that minimalist, chill games like Death Squared seem perfectly suited to the Switch, games like Slime-San and, similarly, Super Meat Boy (which also recently released on Switch) are hindered by the console’s standard input controllers. I have never wished I had a Nintendo Switch Pro Controller more than after some of the more harrowing sections of Slime-San. The lack of a real d-pad and the close proximity of the face buttons and the shoulder buttons on the Joy-Cons force my hands into a claw position that aches for about ten minutes afterwards. Listen, I know that not everyone will have this problem. Maybe I’m just old, or maybe I just have big hands, or god forbid, maybe I’m developing carpal tunnel or early stage arthritis, but playing Slime-San on Switch made me feel like my hands were falling apart. It’s a shame, because this is the kind of game that can ensnare you for hours on end as you try “just one more level” over and over until your thumbs go numb. Conclusion: Slime-San isn’t perfect, but it is charming, and provides a challenging good time for any fan of the genre. I’m glad it released on Switch, so that it’s now on all of the major platforms; PS4, Xbox One, Switch, and Steam. It’s the kind of game that fits nicely on Switch (provided you have a pro controller, or the joy-cons fit your hands perfectly), and especially benefits from the new Nintendo system’s less-congested marketplace. It’s a great game, but it doesn’t stand out from the pack of indie platformers on offer. Heck, it’s not even the most recognizable slime-themed game this year. While never quite reaching the heights of some of its predecessors, Slime-San makes for an enjoyable, but imperfect little platforming adventure. View full article
  2. Review: Slime-San

    Indie retro platformers are a dime a dozen in 2017. Since the success of Super Meat Boy in 2010, the independent scene has become cluttered with also-ran, ultra-challenging, quirky platformers of the 8-bit variety. As an ultra-challenging, quirky platformer of the 8-bit variety, Slime-San, from developer Fabraz and publisher Headup Games, will likely fall squarely into that also-ran category, to no fault of its own. Slime-San’s titular protagonist finds himself trapped inside a worm. The reasons are unknown, but probably have something to do with the fact that it’s… ya know, a slime. Inside the worm, an entire community of slimes has developed, with NPC’s offering up quirky flavor text and gameplay modifications. Everyone seems to have resigned themselves to their fate, eternally trapped inside this volatile invertebrate, but not Slime-San. He’s going to get out, and he’s going to free everyone else in the process. Slime-San’s amusing story, but silly story made me laugh more than a handful of times. Slime-San is a fine example of what has made the platformer genre so enduring even three decades after Mario first bounced off a goomba’s head. The platforming presents an intense dance of thumbs and reflexes as each level tests your ability to flip back and forth between the numerous pitfalls and traps in each stage. Those obstacles range from enemies that chase you around the level, to lasers that rise and fall in tandem, to an ever-present red slime that acts as a timer lending some more tension to each stage. The environments inside the giant worm in which Slime-San is trapped, mainly consist of green and red surfaces. You can bounce and climb up green surfaces, while red surfaces will kill your gungy, little protagonist. You can slow time to pass through green surfaces or perform a quick forward dash to more easily maneuver through the game’s many obstacles. These abilities are key to Slime-San’s mobility, which feels tight and joyful, always keeping you on your toes without becoming too frustrating. This is greatly aided by the game’s generous checkpoint system. Death in Slime-San serves as a lesson in how to avoid it on the next run through a level, rather than a frustrating penalty. That’s not to say Slime-San avoids frustration altogether. As the game progresses, new concepts and obstacles are introduced at a steady drip. While some effectively enhance the challenge, others detract from what Slime-San does well. There are a number of puzzle levels that, when combined with the game’s already perplexing platforming sequences, serve to slow things down and create a repetitive loop that often tested my patience to its breaking point. In addition, underwater levels show up more often that they should, which is to say they should’ve been nixed completely. The underwater stages simply don’t play to Slime-San’s strengths, slowing Slime-San’s movement speed to a crawl and evoking the feeling of swimming through a bowl of Jell-O rather than zipping around tightly designed corridors. At times like this, Slime-San’s creativity undermines its tight, smooth game design. Slime-San’s best moments are challenges that require unimpeachable control, precise timing, and speed. Slime-San is designed for forward momentum, and each one-screen stage lays out where you need to go right from the beginning, so all you need to do is figure out how to get there and the quickest route to take. Boss fights break up the challenges nicely, allowing you to experiment with different techniques to take down each beast. These fights test your skills to the max, but they’re also a lot of fun. I only wish there were more of them. My biggest issue with Slime-San relates directly to the platform I played it on. The Nintendo Switch Joy-Con controllers were not designed well for someone with large hands, and playing Slime-San exasperates that problem. The game demands precise timing and thumb-work, but the Joy-Cons can’t accommodate that for someone like myself. Whereas I find that minimalist, chill games like Death Squared seem perfectly suited to the Switch, games like Slime-San and, similarly, Super Meat Boy (which also recently released on Switch) are hindered by the console’s standard input controllers. I have never wished I had a Nintendo Switch Pro Controller more than after some of the more harrowing sections of Slime-San. The lack of a real d-pad and the close proximity of the face buttons and the shoulder buttons on the Joy-Cons force my hands into a claw position that aches for about ten minutes afterwards. Listen, I know that not everyone will have this problem. Maybe I’m just old, or maybe I just have big hands, or god forbid, maybe I’m developing carpal tunnel or early stage arthritis, but playing Slime-San on Switch made me feel like my hands were falling apart. It’s a shame, because this is the kind of game that can ensnare you for hours on end as you try “just one more level” over and over until your thumbs go numb. Conclusion: Slime-San isn’t perfect, but it is charming, and provides a challenging good time for any fan of the genre. I’m glad it released on Switch, so that it’s now on all of the major platforms; PS4, Xbox One, Switch, and Steam. It’s the kind of game that fits nicely on Switch (provided you have a pro controller, or the joy-cons fit your hands perfectly), and especially benefits from the new Nintendo system’s less-congested marketplace. It’s a great game, but it doesn’t stand out from the pack of indie platformers on offer. Heck, it’s not even the most recognizable slime-themed game this year. While never quite reaching the heights of some of its predecessors, Slime-San makes for an enjoyable, but imperfect little platforming adventure.
  3. We finally have more details on the upcoming Square Enix title Project Octopath Traveler that was teased during the Nintendo Direct back in February. With Project Octopath Traveler, Square Enix seems to be angling to recapture the retro RPG fans with stylish presentation, a branching narrative, and a unique combat system. Watching Octopath Traveler in action and it immediately becomes clear that you've never seen anything quite like it. Square Enix announced that the title will make use of a new aesthetic technique that they have dubbed HD-2D. This new style looks like an old-school RPG format that has been tilted into a 3D world while retaining 2D characters. It's certainly unique and eye-catching while retaining that ye olden days RPG feel. We now know that the octopath in Octopath Traveler references the eight potential protagonists that players can select when beginning their adventure. Each character has their own story, motivations in the world, and a unique ability that will allow them to pursue their goals. The two characters shown, Olberic and Primrose, can manipulate NPCs. Olberic can challenge almost anyone to a duel to prove his strength or move characters out of his way. Primrose, on the other hand, can seduce NPCs to help her on quests or lure enemies into traps. While Octopath Traveler certainly seems like a retro RPG, Square Enix has been experimenting with combat mechanics. Turn-based battles that will be immediately familiar to RPG fans are present in full force, but the major difference in Octopath Traveler is the ability to gain Boost Points with every turn that passes. These points can then be used to boost attacks, doing two, three, or four times more damage. They can also be used to heal, cast spells, or even chain combos together. A demo for Octopath Traveler is currently available on the Nintendo Switch eShop. The full game is expected to release sometime during 2018 and, while it has certainly been covered in Nintendo events, it seems like it might be coming to other systems as well.
  4. We finally have more details on the upcoming Square Enix title Project Octopath Traveler that was teased during the Nintendo Direct back in February. With Project Octopath Traveler, Square Enix seems to be angling to recapture the retro RPG fans with stylish presentation, a branching narrative, and a unique combat system. Watching Octopath Traveler in action and it immediately becomes clear that you've never seen anything quite like it. Square Enix announced that the title will make use of a new aesthetic technique that they have dubbed HD-2D. This new style looks like an old-school RPG format that has been tilted into a 3D world while retaining 2D characters. It's certainly unique and eye-catching while retaining that ye olden days RPG feel. We now know that the octopath in Octopath Traveler references the eight potential protagonists that players can select when beginning their adventure. Each character has their own story, motivations in the world, and a unique ability that will allow them to pursue their goals. The two characters shown, Olberic and Primrose, can manipulate NPCs. Olberic can challenge almost anyone to a duel to prove his strength or move characters out of his way. Primrose, on the other hand, can seduce NPCs to help her on quests or lure enemies into traps. While Octopath Traveler certainly seems like a retro RPG, Square Enix has been experimenting with combat mechanics. Turn-based battles that will be immediately familiar to RPG fans are present in full force, but the major difference in Octopath Traveler is the ability to gain Boost Points with every turn that passes. These points can then be used to boost attacks, doing two, three, or four times more damage. They can also be used to heal, cast spells, or even chain combos together. A demo for Octopath Traveler is currently available on the Nintendo Switch eShop. The full game is expected to release sometime during 2018 and, while it has certainly been covered in Nintendo events, it seems like it might be coming to other systems as well. View full article
  5. The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment (MADE) has announced today that they will be officially resurrecting Habitat, the first graphical massively multiplayer game. Created in 1986 by Lucasfilm Games for the Commodore 64, Habitat proved to be popular, but costly, leading to its discontinuation in 1988. Nearly 30 years later, MADE has overcome the technical challenges and will be reopening Habitat to the public tomorrow. While there had been online games with thriving communities prior to Habitat, they had all been in the world of MUDs, Multi-User Dungeons, games where interaction and visuals were entirely handled by reading and inputting text. Habitat brought games from text into a functional graphics-based format. It also originated the word avatar as used for a digital representation of a player. Players could contract disease, commit murder, rob strangers, and own homes. The game world ran on its own player-driven economy and was also governed by the players. This apparently led to chaos in the early days of Habitat before laws and rules of etiquette were established. Cosmetic items and accessories became an obsession for many in the community - 30 years might be a long time, but gamers still loved looking cool back in the first graphical MMO. “Habitat was so far ahead of its time, it was never able to reach even a tenth of the potential of its capabilities due to the future having not been evenly distributed enough at the time,” said Alex Handy, founder and director of the MADE. “Today, we think of thousands of players being in a single world at once as normal, but Habitat built this type of environment 30 years ago with the digital equivalent of sticks and stones.” As an interesting sidenote: Habitat ran on a Commodore 64 online service named Quantum Link, the predecessor of America Online. This is part of what made making Habitat compatible with modern systems difficult. The architecture of the Commodore 64 and modern computers aren't super compatible, to say nothing of the server-side issues. Restoring Habitat took MADE four years and that was with the help of the original programmers, like Chip Morningstar and Randy Farmer, beta testers, and online contributions from retro enthusiasts and leaders in the tech industry. Fujitsu, the company that purchased the rights to Habitat in order to release it in Japan, Dolby, Sony, and Stratus all contributed to the restoration efforts, too. Randy Farmer was the original C64 client programmer and the first Oracle, one of the administrator gods of Habitat. He also took the lead role in restoring the Habitat software and service. Said Farmer, “We couldn’t have pulled off the small miracle of this game, then or now, without a lot of collaborators: some original team members returned to help out, like original lead Chip Morningstar, myself, and a few of the 500 1986 Habitat Beta testers (who built much of the online world you can see today). Also, many fans of the worlds/MMOs descended from Habitat and contributors from the vibrant C64 retro gaming community. Our contributors are around the world – and include various tech CEOs, CTOs and VPs! We’d all like to thank the MADE for making this project possible: to restore the first MMO, Lucasfilm’s Habitat.” The server hosting the restored alpha version of Habitat will go live to the general public on June 2 at 6pm PT. There will be a local kick-off event at the MADE's Oakland, California location. Players around the world who want to check out the revival of Habitat can do so for free. There will be some fiddling with a C64 emulator and connection to the server, but you can find simple instructions on NeoHabitat.org. View full article
  6. The Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment (MADE) has announced today that they will be officially resurrecting Habitat, the first graphical massively multiplayer game. Created in 1986 by Lucasfilm Games for the Commodore 64, Habitat proved to be popular, but costly, leading to its discontinuation in 1988. Nearly 30 years later, MADE has overcome the technical challenges and will be reopening Habitat to the public tomorrow. While there had been online games with thriving communities prior to Habitat, they had all been in the world of MUDs, Multi-User Dungeons, games where interaction and visuals were entirely handled by reading and inputting text. Habitat brought games from text into a functional graphics-based format. It also originated the word avatar as used for a digital representation of a player. Players could contract disease, commit murder, rob strangers, and own homes. The game world ran on its own player-driven economy and was also governed by the players. This apparently led to chaos in the early days of Habitat before laws and rules of etiquette were established. Cosmetic items and accessories became an obsession for many in the community - 30 years might be a long time, but gamers still loved looking cool back in the first graphical MMO. “Habitat was so far ahead of its time, it was never able to reach even a tenth of the potential of its capabilities due to the future having not been evenly distributed enough at the time,” said Alex Handy, founder and director of the MADE. “Today, we think of thousands of players being in a single world at once as normal, but Habitat built this type of environment 30 years ago with the digital equivalent of sticks and stones.” As an interesting sidenote: Habitat ran on a Commodore 64 online service named Quantum Link, the predecessor of America Online. This is part of what made making Habitat compatible with modern systems difficult. The architecture of the Commodore 64 and modern computers aren't super compatible, to say nothing of the server-side issues. Restoring Habitat took MADE four years and that was with the help of the original programmers, like Chip Morningstar and Randy Farmer, beta testers, and online contributions from retro enthusiasts and leaders in the tech industry. Fujitsu, the company that purchased the rights to Habitat in order to release it in Japan, Dolby, Sony, and Stratus all contributed to the restoration efforts, too. Randy Farmer was the original C64 client programmer and the first Oracle, one of the administrator gods of Habitat. He also took the lead role in restoring the Habitat software and service. Said Farmer, “We couldn’t have pulled off the small miracle of this game, then or now, without a lot of collaborators: some original team members returned to help out, like original lead Chip Morningstar, myself, and a few of the 500 1986 Habitat Beta testers (who built much of the online world you can see today). Also, many fans of the worlds/MMOs descended from Habitat and contributors from the vibrant C64 retro gaming community. Our contributors are around the world – and include various tech CEOs, CTOs and VPs! We’d all like to thank the MADE for making this project possible: to restore the first MMO, Lucasfilm’s Habitat.” The server hosting the restored alpha version of Habitat will go live to the general public on June 2 at 6pm PT. There will be a local kick-off event at the MADE's Oakland, California location. Players around the world who want to check out the revival of Habitat can do so for free. There will be some fiddling with a C64 emulator and connection to the server, but you can find simple instructions on NeoHabitat.org.
  7. In 1992, developer Cyberdreams teamed up with legendary nightmare artist H.R. Giger to create an adventure game unlike any other. Tasked with unraveling the mysteries of a creepy house, terrifying visions, and a spitting migraine, players were slowly roped into a world of imaginative horror as envisioned by the artist who brought the world Ridley Scott's xenomorph in Alien. Over the course of three in-game days, players must make all the correct choices or the consequences could be deadly. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Dark Seed 'Introduction' and 'Passing Time' by CrazyGroupTrio (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvycbZ0FWP0) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  8. In 1992, developer Cyberdreams teamed up with legendary nightmare artist H.R. Giger to create an adventure game unlike any other. Tasked with unraveling the mysteries of a creepy house, terrifying visions, and a spitting migraine, players were slowly roped into a world of imaginative horror as envisioned by the artist who brought the world Ridley Scott's xenomorph in Alien. Over the course of three in-game days, players must make all the correct choices or the consequences could be deadly. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Dark Seed 'Introduction' and 'Passing Time' by CrazyGroupTrio (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvycbZ0FWP0) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  9. A couple years back, we told you about how the Internet Archive had added 2,400 MS-DOS games to its collection. That number of MS-DOS titles has since grown to over 4,000, but there are actually almost double that number of gaming titles that archived from other systems and consoles. The current total number of explorable gaming software on the Archive stands at 7,700. That's a lot of games! The console collection of The Internet Archive includes a staggering number of obscure systems. Ever wondered what it was like to play a Fairchild Channel F? They have 45 games anyone can try out. Never heard of the Epoch Game Pocket Computer? You can play five of those titles. In fact, there are 27 collections of uploaded and emulated software available, including over 1,500 Sega games across four of their consoles. Below you can find a comprehensive list of the consoles, the number of games in the collection, and links to their related collections on Internet Archive: Amstrad GX-4000 - 23 APF-MP1000 - 15 Atari 2600 - 519 Atari 5200 - 43 Atari 7800 – 73 Bally Astrocade - 20 Bandai Super Vision 8000 - 7 Coleco Colecovision - 234 Emerson Arcadia – 58 Entex Adventure Vision - 4 Epoch Game Pocket Computer - 5 Epoch Super Cassette Vision - 31 The Fairchild Channel F – 45 Magnavox Odyssey 2 – 122 Mattel Aquarius - 13 Mattel Intelevision - 21 Mega Duck WG-108 - 9 Neo Geo Pocket/Pocket Color – 316 Sega Game Gear - 446 Sega Genesis - 575 Sega Master System - 563 Sega SG-1000 - 74 Socrates - 8 Shoot ‘Em Up Construction Kit games - 323 Super A’Can – 9 VTech Creativision - 17 Watara Supervision - 44 However, are all of those games worth looking into? That answer is definitely a bit hazy. While Internet Archive can successfully emulate all of these titles, the controls and responsiveness of said games leaves a lot to be desired. The ideal way to play these is definitely not on the Archive, but it stands as a useful repository of history and research for those who want to know more about gaming's past. The uploaded titles include unfinished prototypes and builds for various games, too! Just be warned - there are a lot of... eccentric titles on the Internet Archive that have been made by homebrew developers and may contain some explicit material.
  10. A couple years back, we told you about how the Internet Archive had added 2,400 MS-DOS games to its collection. That number of MS-DOS titles has since grown to over 4,000, but there are actually almost double that number of gaming titles that archived from other systems and consoles. The current total number of explorable gaming software on the Archive stands at 7,700. That's a lot of games! The console collection of The Internet Archive includes a staggering number of obscure systems. Ever wondered what it was like to play a Fairchild Channel F? They have 45 games anyone can try out. Never heard of the Epoch Game Pocket Computer? You can play five of those titles. In fact, there are 27 collections of uploaded and emulated software available, including over 1,500 Sega games across four of their consoles. Below you can find a comprehensive list of the consoles, the number of games in the collection, and links to their related collections on Internet Archive: Amstrad GX-4000 - 23 APF-MP1000 - 15 Atari 2600 - 519 Atari 5200 - 43 Atari 7800 – 73 Bally Astrocade - 20 Bandai Super Vision 8000 - 7 Coleco Colecovision - 234 Emerson Arcadia – 58 Entex Adventure Vision - 4 Epoch Game Pocket Computer - 5 Epoch Super Cassette Vision - 31 The Fairchild Channel F – 45 Magnavox Odyssey 2 – 122 Mattel Aquarius - 13 Mattel Intelevision - 21 Mega Duck WG-108 - 9 Neo Geo Pocket/Pocket Color – 316 Sega Game Gear - 446 Sega Genesis - 575 Sega Master System - 563 Sega SG-1000 - 74 Socrates - 8 Shoot ‘Em Up Construction Kit games - 323 Super A’Can – 9 VTech Creativision - 17 Watara Supervision - 44 However, are all of those games worth looking into? That answer is definitely a bit hazy. While Internet Archive can successfully emulate all of these titles, the controls and responsiveness of said games leaves a lot to be desired. The ideal way to play these is definitely not on the Archive, but it stands as a useful repository of history and research for those who want to know more about gaming's past. The uploaded titles include unfinished prototypes and builds for various games, too! Just be warned - there are a lot of... eccentric titles on the Internet Archive that have been made by homebrew developers and may contain some explicit material. View full article
  11. The folks at Lizardcube release their side-scrolling action-platformer Wonder Boy today. The vibrant, dream-like game follows the either Hu-Man or Hu-Girl as he/she ventures into Monster Land in search of the dragon's room. Unfortunately for our hero, the room isn't without its traps. The dragon curses Wonder Boy, dooming him to live in various animal-human forms. The trailer shows these forms in action: Lizard-Man, Mouse-Man, Lion-Man, Piranha-Man, and Hawk-Man. Each one has different advantages, like a fire breath attack as Lizard-Man or the ability to fly as Hawk-Man. Players will need to master each form in order to recover the Salamander Cross and remove the curse for good. As a nice added bonus, players can switch back and forth from the modern, hand-animated style or a retro 8-bit aesthetic. These changes can be made on the fly and even extend to the audio and sound effects. Wonder Boy is an old Sega franchise that had some of the strangest numbering and naming conventions, even by gaming standards. The series goes Wonder Boy, Wonder Boy: Monster Land, Wonder Boy III: Monster Lair, Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap, Wonder Boy V: Monster World III, and Monster World IV. Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap is a modern reimagining of the 1989 Sega Master System title Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap for modern consoles and possibly an attempt to revive the dormant Wonder Boy IP for a new era. Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap is available now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch
  12. The folks at Lizardcube release their side-scrolling action-platformer Wonder Boy today. The vibrant, dream-like game follows the either Hu-Man or Hu-Girl as he/she ventures into Monster Land in search of the dragon's room. Unfortunately for our hero, the room isn't without its traps. The dragon curses Wonder Boy, dooming him to live in various animal-human forms. The trailer shows these forms in action: Lizard-Man, Mouse-Man, Lion-Man, Piranha-Man, and Hawk-Man. Each one has different advantages, like a fire breath attack as Lizard-Man or the ability to fly as Hawk-Man. Players will need to master each form in order to recover the Salamander Cross and remove the curse for good. As a nice added bonus, players can switch back and forth from the modern, hand-animated style or a retro 8-bit aesthetic. These changes can be made on the fly and even extend to the audio and sound effects. Wonder Boy is an old Sega franchise that had some of the strangest numbering and naming conventions, even by gaming standards. The series goes Wonder Boy, Wonder Boy: Monster Land, Wonder Boy III: Monster Lair, Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap, Wonder Boy V: Monster World III, and Monster World IV. Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap is a modern reimagining of the 1989 Sega Master System title Wonder Boy III: The Dragon's Trap for modern consoles and possibly an attempt to revive the dormant Wonder Boy IP for a new era. Wonder Boy: The Dragon's Trap is available now for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch View full article
  13. Get ready for some farming nostalgia and small town romance, Natsume stealth released their 2003 life simulator Harvest Moon: A Wonderful Life onto the PlayStation Network for PlayStation 4. This move comes as part of the company's celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Harvest Moon series. A Wonderful Life represents the first of two games from the PS2/GameCube era to see a re-release on PS4. In A Wonderful Life, players start with next to nothing aside from a rundown farm with a cow and a dog. Over the course of a few seasons in-game, players can build the farm up into a production juggernaut or let it be and spent their time walking around the nearby town talking with the locals and wooing the several eligible romance options. Players can eventually marry their digital partner and have a kid who then grows up into an adult. The special edition of A Wonderful Life comes with a number of welcome additions to the original game. Players have an additional love interest, more animal types, and the option to continue playing after the end of the story mode. There are also a number of quality of life changes that veterans will likely notice. Harvest Moon: A Wonderful Life is now on PSN for $14.99 - who else is going to be farming up a storm in short order? View full article
  14. Get ready for some farming nostalgia and small town romance, Natsume stealth released their 2003 life simulator Harvest Moon: A Wonderful Life onto the PlayStation Network for PlayStation 4. This move comes as part of the company's celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Harvest Moon series. A Wonderful Life represents the first of two games from the PS2/GameCube era to see a re-release on PS4. In A Wonderful Life, players start with next to nothing aside from a rundown farm with a cow and a dog. Over the course of a few seasons in-game, players can build the farm up into a production juggernaut or let it be and spent their time walking around the nearby town talking with the locals and wooing the several eligible romance options. Players can eventually marry their digital partner and have a kid who then grows up into an adult. The special edition of A Wonderful Life comes with a number of welcome additions to the original game. Players have an additional love interest, more animal types, and the option to continue playing after the end of the story mode. There are also a number of quality of life changes that veterans will likely notice. Harvest Moon: A Wonderful Life is now on PSN for $14.99 - who else is going to be farming up a storm in short order?
  15. Shovel Knight released to critical acclaim and financial success in 2014, becoming one of the most noteworthy indie darlings of the year for its retro aesthetic, tight controls, and boppin' soundtrack (yeah, boppin' - I said it). The DLC campaign Plague of Shadows followed in 2015. The new campaign allowed players to take on the mantle of Plague Knight, one of Shovel Knight's antagonists. Yacht Club Games revealed their next game in that retro platforming world at The Game Awards 2016: Shovel Knight: Specter of Torment. The new side-scrolling platformer has been created from the ground up to play differently than the original Shovel Knight. It follows the quest of Specter Knight to assemble the Order Of No Quarter, the league of knights who allied themselves with the evil Enchantress from the original Shovel Knight. Because Yacht Club Games started from scratch to create Specter of Torment, fans can expect to encounter new everything. The game will look different, sound different, and play different. While Shovel Knight was clearly a homage to Mega Man, Specter of Torment seems to be Mega Man-meets-Castlevania. Much of the gameplay seems based around movement and melee combat. The influence seems to extend to the soundtrack and visuals, too, which adopt more gothic, tones. Players can expect to get their hands on Shovel Knight: Specter of Torment when it releases Spring 2017. Yacht Club Games is also planning to release a campaign focused around King Knight sometime after, though details on that are scarce. Like Plague of Shadows, both Specter of Torment and the campaign for King Knight will be free updates for those who have purchased the base Shovel Knight game. View full article
  16. Shovel Knight released to critical acclaim and financial success in 2014, becoming one of the most noteworthy indie darlings of the year for its retro aesthetic, tight controls, and boppin' soundtrack (yeah, boppin' - I said it). The DLC campaign Plague of Shadows followed in 2015. The new campaign allowed players to take on the mantle of Plague Knight, one of Shovel Knight's antagonists. Yacht Club Games revealed their next game in that retro platforming world at The Game Awards 2016: Shovel Knight: Specter of Torment. The new side-scrolling platformer has been created from the ground up to play differently than the original Shovel Knight. It follows the quest of Specter Knight to assemble the Order Of No Quarter, the league of knights who allied themselves with the evil Enchantress from the original Shovel Knight. Because Yacht Club Games started from scratch to create Specter of Torment, fans can expect to encounter new everything. The game will look different, sound different, and play different. While Shovel Knight was clearly a homage to Mega Man, Specter of Torment seems to be Mega Man-meets-Castlevania. Much of the gameplay seems based around movement and melee combat. The influence seems to extend to the soundtrack and visuals, too, which adopt more gothic, tones. Players can expect to get their hands on Shovel Knight: Specter of Torment when it releases Spring 2017. Yacht Club Games is also planning to release a campaign focused around King Knight sometime after, though details on that are scarce. Like Plague of Shadows, both Specter of Torment and the campaign for King Knight will be free updates for those who have purchased the base Shovel Knight game.
  17. Check it out!! Couple of those people look kinda familiar!
  18. RetroFest

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    Good Morning Everyone! The Akron Extra Life Guild is hosting a recruitment booth for RetroFest, located at the Holiday Inn on 4520 Everhard Road NW in Canton, OH on Saturday, May 14. Tentative hours are 10 AM - 6 PM. Parking is available on site. We need people to man the booth, register interested gamers, pass out flyers & answer questions about Extra Life. Please reply to this thread with your name and the shift(s) you can cover. We can be flexible with shift times, just let us know what you need. Thank you! For details about RetroFest: https://www.facebook.com/events/510300779150300/
  19. "Retro"/"Parent" Initiative

    Happy Monday! I'm not sure if this would work better as a fundraising idea or a recruiting idea, but the thought may kick start something either way! I had made a list of some ideas for outreach and a "retro initiative" came to mind. Not necessarily a push for playing old Mario games or anything like that, but more of a way to reach parents or older generations. I know when I try to explain Extra Life to my mom (who was a PC gamer back in the day) it's still a bit over her head. Maybe Extra Lifers could ask their parents what they played as kids, or even as adults, and we could somehow use that to peak their interest in signing up themselves, or at the very least help them better relate to the program and be more willing to support and donate. For example, my mom played a lot of Riven when I was growing up. I never hear mention of that game anymore, but I know it was popular and it might peak some memories for people. Then today I saw a campaign from Netflix called #HookUpYourParents as a way to show how easy it is for those who may not be up to date with technology to download, register, and use Netflix. It pretty much nailed the idea I had in mind, so I figured I'd share the thought. I don't know how I would run with this idea, but if anyone else thinks it may work maybe we can brainstorm something great!
  20. Favorite Old School RPG??

    Hey guys! I was wondering what some of your favorite old school rpgs are??? Lets say anything ps1 and older! Mine are: Chrono trigger, lunar silver star story complete, legend of dragoon, shining force and a few others!!!
  21. until
    Come find Extra Life Austin at Classic Game Fest, the BIGGEST Retro Video Game Convention in Texas! We'll be at Booth #100 telling people what Extra Life does for the kids here in Central Texas! Sign up for a chance to win swag or a pair of tickets to RTX!
  22. The Internet Archive added a staggering 2,388 pieces of video game history to its collection today. It has also launched the beta for its website that will make its contents more accessible and visually appealing. Jason Scott, one of the leaders of the Archive's push toward a more comprehensible website and a proponent of making these old game playable in-browser, explained in a blog post that not all of the MS-DOS games will be stable, but "on the whole, you will experience some analogue of the MS-DOS program, in your browser, instantly." And it is true! Some of the games on the Internet Archive work splendidly in-browser. There is no fiddling trying to get the programs to run on machine that can barely recognize what they are. True, some of them don't work properly, but all of them work enough to give you an idea of how they played; what they looked and sounded like. It is a really impressive feat. I highly recommend you go over and poke around the titles on stored on the Archive just to see what's out there. If you have trouble with the beta site, just switch over to the old version. View full article
  23. The Internet Archive added a staggering 2,388 pieces of video game history to its collection today. It has also launched the beta for its website that will make its contents more accessible and visually appealing. Jason Scott, one of the leaders of the Archive's push toward a more comprehensible website and a proponent of making these old game playable in-browser, explained in a blog post that not all of the MS-DOS games will be stable, but "on the whole, you will experience some analogue of the MS-DOS program, in your browser, instantly." And it is true! Some of the games on the Internet Archive work splendidly in-browser. There is no fiddling trying to get the programs to run on machine that can barely recognize what they are. True, some of them don't work properly, but all of them work enough to give you an idea of how they played; what they looked and sounded like. It is a really impressive feat. I highly recommend you go over and poke around the titles on stored on the Archive just to see what's out there. If you have trouble with the beta site, just switch over to the old version.
  24. Beginning January 13th, PlayStation will be launching a subscription for their PlayStation Now streaming service. PlayStation owners can currently only pay to rent individual titles for differing period of time ranging from four hours to ninety days at prices that vary from as little as $1.99 to $14.99. Subscribers will have access to every PlayStation Now title for as long as they remain subscribed. PlayStation plans to implement two subscription bundles. One month will cost customers $19.99. Alternatively, a three month package will run $44.99. PlayStation points out that if the price seems steep, the service grants access to over 100 titles from the PlayStation 3's library. For the skeptical, PlayStation is offering a seven-day free trial. The subscription will be rolled out on PlayStation 4 before making its way to other systems and devices. To celebrate the launch of the subscription service, a free PlayStation Now theme will be available for PS4 users in early January. Downloading the theme before the end of January will automatically enter PS4 owners into a drawing for a shot at netting a one-year subscription to PlayStation Now. PlayStation Now has been criticized for having inflated prices and being a bit jittery or sluggish when it come to responding to inputs. Is a subscription plan the solution? Does this announcement make you more interested in using PlayStation Now? View full article
  25. Beginning January 13th, PlayStation will be launching a subscription for their PlayStation Now streaming service. PlayStation owners can currently only pay to rent individual titles for differing period of time ranging from four hours to ninety days at prices that vary from as little as $1.99 to $14.99. Subscribers will have access to every PlayStation Now title for as long as they remain subscribed. PlayStation plans to implement two subscription bundles. One month will cost customers $19.99. Alternatively, a three month package will run $44.99. PlayStation points out that if the price seems steep, the service grants access to over 100 titles from the PlayStation 3's library. For the skeptical, PlayStation is offering a seven-day free trial. The subscription will be rolled out on PlayStation 4 before making its way to other systems and devices. To celebrate the launch of the subscription service, a free PlayStation Now theme will be available for PS4 users in early January. Downloading the theme before the end of January will automatically enter PS4 owners into a drawing for a shot at netting a one-year subscription to PlayStation Now. PlayStation Now has been criticized for having inflated prices and being a bit jittery or sluggish when it come to responding to inputs. Is a subscription plan the solution? Does this announcement make you more interested in using PlayStation Now?