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Found 16 results

  1. Square Enix announced at E3 2015 that the long-awaited Final Fantasy VII remake was finally going to become a reality over a decade after first showing footage of a remade Final Fantasy VII opening running on the PlayStation 3. Since then, more sceenshots and trailers have appeared along with details about how Square Enix would be releasing the game as an episodic series (not the way many would prefer to play FFVII, but at least the remake would finally exist). Now the director of the PlayStation 4 HD remaster of Final Fantasy XII, Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age, has revealed that Square Enix might very well be expanding its remake efforts to another Final Fantasy title from the PlayStation One era, though that revelation comes with some predictable caveats. In an interview with The International Business Times - UK, Takashi Katano let some insider speculation slip, saying, "[Final Fantasy 12] is a PS2 title, and you look at the other titles in the series and technologically anything before the PS2 era is going to be quite difficult to do a modern remaster of to a suitable level of quality. That means [a future game] is far more likely to be a remake." That statement is hardly controversial - Square Enix has reimagined and remade the earliest Final Fantasy titles for mobile, PC, and Nintendo DS/3DS several times over the years. However, this news coming from a director of a major Square Enix project seems to imply that any upcoming remake would be a major, franchise undertaking, perhaps on par with their efforts to remake Final Fantasy VII. The question seems to be which Final Fantasy game would see such a complete overhaul? Final Fantasy V and VI, though originally released on the Super Nintendo, could be a contenders as both eventually made their way to the PlayStation and the current director of the Final Fantasy VII remake has expressed interest in remaking those two titles in particular. However, significant camps of support are present for Final Fantasy VIII and also Final Fantasy IX. Expanding on his statement, Katano explained that the process would be less about what any individuals within Square Enix would like to port and more about what their customers want, "I've personally been working at Square Enix for 20 years now and I've got a lot of memories from that time. I think the way that we look at it is not the game that [we] would like to remake it's really down to what the players, the fans, want to see. We really have to hear their voices on that, if they want to see a remake or a remaster of a certain game then that's more likely to be the one we go for." Anything beyond the Final Fantasy VII remake is likely still in only the very earliest stages of development, if at all, but it is certainly wonderful news to hear that the company is open to revisiting their classic line-up with more modern technology. View full article
  2. Square Enix announced at E3 2015 that the long-awaited Final Fantasy VII remake was finally going to become a reality over a decade after first showing footage of a remade Final Fantasy VII opening running on the PlayStation 3. Since then, more sceenshots and trailers have appeared along with details about how Square Enix would be releasing the game as an episodic series (not the way many would prefer to play FFVII, but at least the remake would finally exist). Now the director of the PlayStation 4 HD remaster of Final Fantasy XII, Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age, has revealed that Square Enix might very well be expanding its remake efforts to another Final Fantasy title from the PlayStation One era, though that revelation comes with some predictable caveats. In an interview with The International Business Times - UK, Takashi Katano let some insider speculation slip, saying, "[Final Fantasy 12] is a PS2 title, and you look at the other titles in the series and technologically anything before the PS2 era is going to be quite difficult to do a modern remaster of to a suitable level of quality. That means [a future game] is far more likely to be a remake." That statement is hardly controversial - Square Enix has reimagined and remade the earliest Final Fantasy titles for mobile, PC, and Nintendo DS/3DS several times over the years. However, this news coming from a director of a major Square Enix project seems to imply that any upcoming remake would be a major, franchise undertaking, perhaps on par with their efforts to remake Final Fantasy VII. The question seems to be which Final Fantasy game would see such a complete overhaul? Final Fantasy V and VI, though originally released on the Super Nintendo, could be a contenders as both eventually made their way to the PlayStation and the current director of the Final Fantasy VII remake has expressed interest in remaking those two titles in particular. However, significant camps of support are present for Final Fantasy VIII and also Final Fantasy IX. Expanding on his statement, Katano explained that the process would be less about what any individuals within Square Enix would like to port and more about what their customers want, "I've personally been working at Square Enix for 20 years now and I've got a lot of memories from that time. I think the way that we look at it is not the game that [we] would like to remake it's really down to what the players, the fans, want to see. We really have to hear their voices on that, if they want to see a remake or a remaster of a certain game then that's more likely to be the one we go for." Anything beyond the Final Fantasy VII remake is likely still in only the very earliest stages of development, if at all, but it is certainly wonderful news to hear that the company is open to revisiting their classic line-up with more modern technology.
  3. Supergiant Games announced that an overhauled version of Bastion, their highly acclaimed isometric action RPG, is now available on Xbox One. The new version runs in 1080p, an improvement over the 720p resolution of the original. It also includes the Stranger's Dream DLC, which was added to Bastion post-launch and builds on Rucks' backstory. The Xbox One version isn't a mere port. Supergiant Games claims that the new iteration was built from the ground up to feel natural to the Xbox One. Since Supergiant Games is working on their 2017 title Pyre, the job of rebuilding Bastion fell to the Barcelona development studio Blitworks. If you own Bastion for Xbox 360 already, good news! The title is free on Xbox One for everyone who owns the 360 version until January 1, 2017. Those who are looking to pick up Bastion on console for the first time will have to shell out $14.99. The original Bastion launched on July 20, 2011. To date, the indie darling has sold over four million copies and garnered hundreds of awards for its art direction, music, voice work, and tight gameplay. Seriously, it might even be one of the best games of all-time. Due to its popularity, Bastion became the face of the indie game revolution for several years and made its way to almost every possible platform.
  4. Supergiant Games announced that an overhauled version of Bastion, their highly acclaimed isometric action RPG, is now available on Xbox One. The new version runs in 1080p, an improvement over the 720p resolution of the original. It also includes the Stranger's Dream DLC, which was added to Bastion post-launch and builds on Rucks' backstory. The Xbox One version isn't a mere port. Supergiant Games claims that the new iteration was built from the ground up to feel natural to the Xbox One. Since Supergiant Games is working on their 2017 title Pyre, the job of rebuilding Bastion fell to the Barcelona development studio Blitworks. If you own Bastion for Xbox 360 already, good news! The title is free on Xbox One for everyone who owns the 360 version until January 1, 2017. Those who are looking to pick up Bastion on console for the first time will have to shell out $14.99. The original Bastion launched on July 20, 2011. To date, the indie darling has sold over four million copies and garnered hundreds of awards for its art direction, music, voice work, and tight gameplay. Seriously, it might even be one of the best games of all-time. Due to its popularity, Bastion became the face of the indie game revolution for several years and made its way to almost every possible platform. View full article
  5. A South Korean news site, iNews24, published a story in which it claims multiple sources have confirmed that Blizzard will be pulling back the curtain on a high-definition remake of the original StarCraft this September during the Copa Intercontinental, a StarCraft II World Championship event held in Mexico City. Blizzard has released a statement to say that they have no announcements to make at this time, which doesn't necessarily deny that StarCraft HD is happening or that a reveal is imminent. iNews24 reports (as translated by Kotaku) that, "multiple sources with knowledge of Blizzard internal plans [have] said that Blizzard will reveal StarCraft HD to the public this September. The StarCraft HD remastered version will retain the original gameplay and is said to have improved graphics resolution and user interface (UI)." The original StarCraft and its Broodwar expansion have remained consistently among the top played games in Korea, despite being almost two decade old. Not bad for games released in 1998! Take this report with a grain of salt, but the market definitely exists for a remastered update to the beloved RTS classic, so there are few reasons to believe that Blizzard wouldn't be looking to release an HD upgrade in this era of remasters. What do you think? Would you jump back into classic StarCraft with a new coat of paint? View full article
  6. A South Korean news site, iNews24, published a story in which it claims multiple sources have confirmed that Blizzard will be pulling back the curtain on a high-definition remake of the original StarCraft this September during the Copa Intercontinental, a StarCraft II World Championship event held in Mexico City. Blizzard has released a statement to say that they have no announcements to make at this time, which doesn't necessarily deny that StarCraft HD is happening or that a reveal is imminent. iNews24 reports (as translated by Kotaku) that, "multiple sources with knowledge of Blizzard internal plans [have] said that Blizzard will reveal StarCraft HD to the public this September. The StarCraft HD remastered version will retain the original gameplay and is said to have improved graphics resolution and user interface (UI)." The original StarCraft and its Broodwar expansion have remained consistently among the top played games in Korea, despite being almost two decade old. Not bad for games released in 1998! Take this report with a grain of salt, but the market definitely exists for a remastered update to the beloved RTS classic, so there are few reasons to believe that Blizzard wouldn't be looking to release an HD upgrade in this era of remasters. What do you think? Would you jump back into classic StarCraft with a new coat of paint?
  7. Kickstarted games have been under fire recently after several high-profile Kickstarters disappeared or halted before making it to market and the somewhat anticlimactic release of the crowdfunded Mighty No. 9. Despite the bad press that these disappointments have garnered Kickstarter, Nightdive Studios has managed to attract almost 22,000 backers and $1.35 million in funds to remake the original System Shock title using the latest version of Unity. And you know what? Their vision for a reborn System Shock looks pretty fantastic. Nightdive is relatively well-known for the way it has revived and updated classic franchises to be compatible for modern technology. I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream, System Shock 1 & 2, and Turok 1 & 2 are all available in their original condition (with some compatibility updates) on modern PCs thanks to their work. Not only that, but the studio has contributed to several high-profile releases like Fallout 3, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, and BioShock Infinite. As part of generating interest in their campaign, Nightdive released a pre-alpha demo that captures the look and feel of the game they want to make, though it comes with a stipulation that pretty much every aspect of it is subject to change. you can download the demo for free on Steam, Good Old Games, and the Humble Store. It's actually happening, and it seems to be in the hands of people who know how to treat old, well-loved properties right. The System Shock remake will be available initially for PC and Xbox One, but will also be coming to Mac and Linux. Nightdive has left open the possibility of bringing the title to PlayStation 4 and VR devices. For those who still want to get in on the fundraising, Nightdive is opening up the campaign to PayPal donations (though the page on which people can donate is still under construction). Certain stretch goals from the Kickstarter will carry over into ongoing fundraising efforts, too, like VR support, a full orchestral score, and more. Those who donate during the post-Kickstarter fundraising will likely get different backer rewards that have yet to be revealed. View full article
  8. Kickstarted games have been under fire recently after several high-profile Kickstarters disappeared or halted before making it to market and the somewhat anticlimactic release of the crowdfunded Mighty No. 9. Despite the bad press that these disappointments have garnered Kickstarter, Nightdive Studios has managed to attract almost 22,000 backers and $1.35 million in funds to remake the original System Shock title using the latest version of Unity. And you know what? Their vision for a reborn System Shock looks pretty fantastic. Nightdive is relatively well-known for the way it has revived and updated classic franchises to be compatible for modern technology. I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream, System Shock 1 & 2, and Turok 1 & 2 are all available in their original condition (with some compatibility updates) on modern PCs thanks to their work. Not only that, but the studio has contributed to several high-profile releases like Fallout 3, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, and BioShock Infinite. As part of generating interest in their campaign, Nightdive released a pre-alpha demo that captures the look and feel of the game they want to make, though it comes with a stipulation that pretty much every aspect of it is subject to change. you can download the demo for free on Steam, Good Old Games, and the Humble Store. It's actually happening, and it seems to be in the hands of people who know how to treat old, well-loved properties right. The System Shock remake will be available initially for PC and Xbox One, but will also be coming to Mac and Linux. Nightdive has left open the possibility of bringing the title to PlayStation 4 and VR devices. For those who still want to get in on the fundraising, Nightdive is opening up the campaign to PayPal donations (though the page on which people can donate is still under construction). Certain stretch goals from the Kickstarter will carry over into ongoing fundraising efforts, too, like VR support, a full orchestral score, and more. Those who donate during the post-Kickstarter fundraising will likely get different backer rewards that have yet to be revealed.
  9. Konami, keeping with its pursuit of the lucrative pachinko market in Japan, revealed the existence of a Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater pachinko machine. The trailer for the device spans over seven minutes and goes into great detail regarding the mechanics and gampelay pachinko players can expect to see. However, the most intriguing parts of the reveal are the cutscenes. The scenes shown in the trailer appear to be from Metal Gear Solid 3 remade in the Fox Engine on which Metal Gear Solid 5 ran. The trailer claims that the upcoming pachinko machine houses over 124Gb of data for its gameplay and cutscenes. This would be a huge amount of time and investment for pachinko, but might make more sense as a harbinger of a full-on remake in the engine Konami has barely put to use. The cutscenes themselves seem fairly consistent with the original PlayStation 2 title, though there are a few that appear to be created specifically for pachinko mini-games. Keep in mind, this is all speculation. Looking at Konami's recent moves as a company, I think there is reason to believe a remake of Snake Eater is imminent. Konami has been showing a desire to get more out of its properties while avoiding the bloat of costs that can be associated with AAA development. They also haven't remade Metal Gear Solid 3 yet, which seems remarkable given that the entire industry is remaking pretty much everything. With Hideo Kojima gone, Konami could very well be reluctant to put out more original Metal Gear titles. Konami's impressive Fox Engine has been gathering dust, too. All of these signs point toward a willingness to move forward with a remake of Metal Gear Solid 3 for modern consoles and the pachinko machine's assets confirm that to me. There is no official word on whether Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater is being remade, but I'd be willing to bet it is in development. View full article
  10. Konami, keeping with its pursuit of the lucrative pachinko market in Japan, revealed the existence of a Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater pachinko machine. The trailer for the device spans over seven minutes and goes into great detail regarding the mechanics and gampelay pachinko players can expect to see. However, the most intriguing parts of the reveal are the cutscenes. The scenes shown in the trailer appear to be from Metal Gear Solid 3 remade in the Fox Engine on which Metal Gear Solid 5 ran. The trailer claims that the upcoming pachinko machine houses over 124Gb of data for its gameplay and cutscenes. This would be a huge amount of time and investment for pachinko, but might make more sense as a harbinger of a full-on remake in the engine Konami has barely put to use. The cutscenes themselves seem fairly consistent with the original PlayStation 2 title, though there are a few that appear to be created specifically for pachinko mini-games. Keep in mind, this is all speculation. Looking at Konami's recent moves as a company, I think there is reason to believe a remake of Snake Eater is imminent. Konami has been showing a desire to get more out of its properties while avoiding the bloat of costs that can be associated with AAA development. They also haven't remade Metal Gear Solid 3 yet, which seems remarkable given that the entire industry is remaking pretty much everything. With Hideo Kojima gone, Konami could very well be reluctant to put out more original Metal Gear titles. Konami's impressive Fox Engine has been gathering dust, too. All of these signs point toward a willingness to move forward with a remake of Metal Gear Solid 3 for modern consoles and the pachinko machine's assets confirm that to me. There is no official word on whether Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater is being remade, but I'd be willing to bet it is in development.
  11. After two years of hard work, a group of dedicated Mega Man fans have created a remake of the the two 90s Mega Man titles for PC under the title of Mega Man DOS Remake. The confusingly named DOS games Mega Man and Mega Man III (there was no Mega Man II for DOS) hold the highly odious status of being the worst Mega Man games ever created. Many people don't even know that they exist, and Capcom is probably happy with that state of affairs. Why remake games that are so universally despised? The team explains on their download page, "The few who received a floppy disk instead of a cartridge for Christmas many years ago were greeted with unfair levels, plain bosses, and silent gameplay! Be it from lack of care, or maybe lack of ability[, these] games were bad, but every game can have a second chance right?" Mega Man DOS Remake has been totally revamped in the name of giving the forgotten horrors of the originals new life and another attempt at greatness. The two PC games are now one in the remake and have been redone in the classic NES style and now actually feature music during the levels, something the originals painfully lacked. There are nine robot masters to conquer and the level design shifts depending on what order players defeat the bosses. For players who find the remake too easy, Mega Man DOS Remake comes with a level editor that players can use to create their own stages, complete with a boss AI planner to get the most out of fan-created boss battles. It also includes time-attack and challenge modes. If this seems interesting, check out Mega Man DOS Remake for free over on its Steam Workshop page. It's still a work in progress, so be aware that you might encounter glitches. If you do, the development team asks that you notify them so they can fix the problem in the future. View full article
  12. After two years of hard work, a group of dedicated Mega Man fans have created a remake of the the two 90s Mega Man titles for PC under the title of Mega Man DOS Remake. The confusingly named DOS games Mega Man and Mega Man III (there was no Mega Man II for DOS) hold the highly odious status of being the worst Mega Man games ever created. Many people don't even know that they exist, and Capcom is probably happy with that state of affairs. Why remake games that are so universally despised? The team explains on their download page, "The few who received a floppy disk instead of a cartridge for Christmas many years ago were greeted with unfair levels, plain bosses, and silent gameplay! Be it from lack of care, or maybe lack of ability[, these] games were bad, but every game can have a second chance right?" Mega Man DOS Remake has been totally revamped in the name of giving the forgotten horrors of the originals new life and another attempt at greatness. The two PC games are now one in the remake and have been redone in the classic NES style and now actually feature music during the levels, something the originals painfully lacked. There are nine robot masters to conquer and the level design shifts depending on what order players defeat the bosses. For players who find the remake too easy, Mega Man DOS Remake comes with a level editor that players can use to create their own stages, complete with a boss AI planner to get the most out of fan-created boss battles. It also includes time-attack and challenge modes. If this seems interesting, check out Mega Man DOS Remake for free over on its Steam Workshop page. It's still a work in progress, so be aware that you might encounter glitches. If you do, the development team asks that you notify them so they can fix the problem in the future.
  13. Teased way back in the days of 2013, the remake of the 1989 Amiga classic Shadow of the Beast has resurfaced. The Sony-published title puts players in control of Aarbron, a beast on a quest of bloody vengeance on a distant, magical world. However, a number of features have been outlined that weren't known before. The game touts a smooth 60 frames-per-second and the team at Heavy Spectrum is working hard to make sure that the response time allows for the most enjoyable experience. The world of Karamoon features a variety of environments (not just the desert many might remember from the teaser!) and a wide variety of creatures to fight. The remake includes a robust upgrade tree and a variety of artifacts that will allow players to gain the upper hand in combat. Matt Birch, founder of Heavy Spectrum, also talks about the challenges of managing difficulty. There are easier modes that will allow players to explore the combat system and experience the story, but Birch says the true difficulty is Beast mode. Shadow of the Beast hits the PSN for the PlayStation 4 on May 17. View full article
  14. Teased way back in the days of 2013, the remake of the 1989 Amiga classic Shadow of the Beast has resurfaced. The Sony-published title puts players in control of Aarbron, a beast on a quest of bloody vengeance on a distant, magical world. However, a number of features have been outlined that weren't known before. The game touts a smooth 60 frames-per-second and the team at Heavy Spectrum is working hard to make sure that the response time allows for the most enjoyable experience. The world of Karamoon features a variety of environments (not just the desert many might remember from the teaser!) and a wide variety of creatures to fight. The remake includes a robust upgrade tree and a variety of artifacts that will allow players to gain the upper hand in combat. Matt Birch, founder of Heavy Spectrum, also talks about the challenges of managing difficulty. There are easier modes that will allow players to explore the combat system and experience the story, but Birch says the true difficulty is Beast mode. Shadow of the Beast hits the PSN for the PlayStation 4 on May 17.
  15. Night Dive Studios revealed in a Twitter conversation that they will also be bringing remastered versions of both Turok and Turok 2 to the Xbox One. Night Dive released the remaster of the original Turok onto Steam last year, but nothing had been said about that game making it to Xbox One until the Twitter reveal. Not only that, but no one had heard that Turok 2 would be getting the remaster treatment at all. Unfortunately, the developer was a bit sketchy on when the games would be coming to Xbox One or what improvements would be made to Turok 2 in the remaster. The studio didn't discount the possibility of the titles also appearing on other platforms like PlayStation 4. Night Dive has made a name for itself over the years by preserving and improving important titles from gaming's past. They've worked on 7th Guest, Wizardy 6-8, and the enhanced editions of System Shock and System Shock 2. They are also currently working on an effort to completely overhaul the original System Shock with a modern flair, Who else is ready to fight dinosaurs on Xbox One sometime soon?
  16. Night Dive Studios revealed in a Twitter conversation that they will also be bringing remastered versions of both Turok and Turok 2 to the Xbox One. Night Dive released the remaster of the original Turok onto Steam last year, but nothing had been said about that game making it to Xbox One until the Twitter reveal. Not only that, but no one had heard that Turok 2 would be getting the remaster treatment at all. Unfortunately, the developer was a bit sketchy on when the games would be coming to Xbox One or what improvements would be made to Turok 2 in the remaster. The studio didn't discount the possibility of the titles also appearing on other platforms like PlayStation 4. Night Dive has made a name for itself over the years by preserving and improving important titles from gaming's past. They've worked on 7th Guest, Wizardy 6-8, and the enhanced editions of System Shock and System Shock 2. They are also currently working on an effort to completely overhaul the original System Shock with a modern flair, Who else is ready to fight dinosaurs on Xbox One sometime soon? View full article