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Found 49 results

  1. I'm doing my first stream for Extra Life on 9/1, and my first stream overall. I'm going to be streaming from the PS4, and I'd like to be able to have group chat in during the stream. Does anybody know of a way to do this?
  2. Multiplayer shooter fans curious about Lawbreakers have a chance to give the physics-defying shooter a whirl before it releases later this summer. An open beta went live today on Steam and will run until July 5. The beta features a new map, the mountainous Vertigo, as well as a new mode called Uplink. Teams are tasked with capturing an uplink from the center of the map and delivering it to their base where it must be protected it to earn points. Players can also test out customizable weapon stickers, including a special sticker earned by finishing five matches. This sticker will transfer into the full release. You can hop in on the open beta by visiting the Lawbreakers site. Lawbreakers releases August 8 for $29.99 on PC and PS4. For more on the title, check out its trailer from the PC Gaming Show View full article
  3. Multiplayer shooter fans curious about Lawbreakers have a chance to give the physics-defying shooter a whirl before it releases later this summer. An open beta went live today on Steam and will run until July 5. The beta features a new map, the mountainous Vertigo, as well as a new mode called Uplink. Teams are tasked with capturing an uplink from the center of the map and delivering it to their base where it must be protected it to earn points. Players can also test out customizable weapon stickers, including a special sticker earned by finishing five matches. This sticker will transfer into the full release. You can hop in on the open beta by visiting the Lawbreakers site. Lawbreakers releases August 8 for $29.99 on PC and PS4. For more on the title, check out its trailer from the PC Gaming Show
  4. The game that hailed itself as the "easiest PS4 Platinum Trophy" has been pulled from the PlayStation Network after only two days of being in the digital store. A platinum trophy, the epitome of a trophy addict's time and dedication, could be achieved in an hour, or a mere twenty minutes. The gameplay consisted solely of sliding puzzles of different 4K wallpapers. In the trailer above, the devs even note that they even had their brief doubts about a number of trophies in the game. "Oh no, no," a note in the trailer says, "did we over-do it on trophies?" PlayStation's removal of the game seems to be a response to concern over the quality of some games being released. View full article
  5. The game that hailed itself as the "easiest PS4 Platinum Trophy" has been pulled from the PlayStation Network after only two days of being in the digital store. A platinum trophy, the epitome of a trophy addict's time and dedication, could be achieved in an hour, or a mere twenty minutes. The gameplay consisted solely of sliding puzzles of different 4K wallpapers. In the trailer above, the devs even note that they even had their brief doubts about a number of trophies in the game. "Oh no, no," a note in the trailer says, "did we over-do it on trophies?" PlayStation's removal of the game seems to be a response to concern over the quality of some games being released.
  6. July's PlayStation Plus free game roster is up. The line-up features a healthy mix of slasher horror, political intrigue, and Pomeranians surviving post-apocalyptic Japan. Adventure horror title Until Dawn and the season pass for Telltale's Game of Thrones series make up the PlayStation 4 offerings. PlayStation 3 owners can download Tokyo Jungle and Darkstalkers Resurrection. For Vita, Element 4I and Don't Die Mr. Robot (with cross-buy on PS4) are up for grabs. From July 4 to October 24, PS Plus users also received the mobile-focused quiz game That's You! to mark the launch of PlayLink, an initiative that allows players to interact with games using use their smartphones. What do you think of July's Plus offerings? View full article
  7. July's PlayStation Plus free game roster is up. The line-up features a healthy mix of slasher horror, political intrigue, and Pomeranians surviving post-apocalyptic Japan. Adventure horror title Until Dawn and the season pass for Telltale's Game of Thrones series make up the PlayStation 4 offerings. PlayStation 3 owners can download Tokyo Jungle and Darkstalkers Resurrection. For Vita, Element 4I and Don't Die Mr. Robot (with cross-buy on PS4) are up for grabs. From July 4 to October 24, PS Plus users also received the mobile-focused quiz game That's You! to mark the launch of PlayLink, an initiative that allows players to interact with games using use their smartphones. What do you think of July's Plus offerings?
  8. Feature: Review: Nex Machina

    My hands ache, palms are sweaty. I let out a huge sigh of relief as the final boss explodes into a confetti of voxels and vibrant particle effects. How many lives did I throw at that thing before I finally managed to take it down? A few dozen? Sounds about right. Although the journey was exhilarating romp, it was also draining test of hand-eye coordination and reflexes. That about sums up Nex Machina: an addictive arcade shooter with a blistering challenge that occasionally gets too tough for its own good. Housemarque knows how to craft arcade shooters that keep players coming back for more. The studio’s past works, Super Stardust HD and Resogun, are among the best modern takes on the genre. With Nex Machina, the studio has assembled perhaps its most arduous game yet by teaming up with Robotron/Smash TV mastermind Eugene Jarvis. The influence of those arcade classics are immediately evident. Players mow down waves upon waves of enemies from a top-down, third person perspective. Clearing one arena teleports players to the next, and so on until you reach the world’s boss. Nex Machina is a fast-paced, no-nonsense affair right out of the gate. I died within the first few seconds thanks to how swiftly enemies swarm players from all sides, sometimes in Galaga-esque serpentine patterns, other times in messy groups. If fending off a dozen hostile creatures wasn’t enough, you’re often doing so while simultaneously avoiding spinning laser beams, screen-filling projectile waves, and long-range mortar fire. Nex Machina revels in throwing everything but the kitchen sink at players and letting your guard down for even a nanosecond results in an explosive demise The game is demanding, sometimes to a fault, but it’s supremely satisfying to outmaneuver and outgun seemingly insurmountable opposition. Watching targets burst into tiny cubes adds to that thrill thanks to the crisp voxel graphics and destructible environments. Multiple secrets lay within each arena, most within objects like breakable cubes and boulders. The game lacks a tutorial, betting on players to blast away everything in sight and discover things on their own–an assumption quickly proven accurate. A fun and devilish layer of challenge comes in seeking out these collectibles. Since eradicating foes automatically warps you to the next room, completionists must intentionally stay their trigger finger in order to stick around and thoroughly inspect an area. However, doing this increases your likelihood of getting killed. So do you quickly mow down foes in the name of swift progression or put everything on the line for maximum points? The best example of this decision-making comes from rescuing humans from the clutches of aliens ala Resogun. Gathering them all feels awesome, but going out of my way to do so cost me countless lives. Sometimes I was forced to abandon humans in the interest of completing a merciless zone–a decision I always hated. No matter how frustrating this task got, I felt compelled to perform better just to spite Nex Machina and prove that I could not only win but do so in style, even if that didn’t always work out. While I found Nex Machina to be generally fair despite its difficulty, cheap deaths weren’t a complete non-factor. Some questionable respawns occasionally drop players directly in harm's way, such as in front of turrets, killing them before they have a chance to react. This problem rears its head most in busy situations where’s there’s no real safe spot to drop into. The small character can easily be lost among packed crowds, creating an infuriating game of Where’s Waldo that made me feel cheated when I failed due a loss of visuals rather than a lack of skill. Another issue is the lack of saving in the arcade campaign. Once started, it must be completed in one sitting, otherwise players start over from the beginning. I learned this the hard way after I completed the third world and closed the game, assuming I’d be checkpointed at the beginning of world four upon my return. To my horror, I was greeted by the first world’s opening motorcycle sequence. I get the old-school arcade mentality behind this design, and, thankfully, worlds can be completed in roughly 10 minutes (depending on how much you die). However, it's annoying to be forced to commit like that. I hit several rough spots that caused me to tap out for a breather, forcing me to leave my PS4 in rest mode for long stretches since I couldn’t shut off the game entirely. Nex Machina does a nice job of accommodating each skill-level of player without dumbing down the core experience. Rookie allots unlimited continues for those who want to see the entire game with the freedom of failing as much as required. Experienced grants 99 continues (which burn away far quicker than believed), Veteran grants a mere 10 continues and tougher foes, and the unlockable Master difficulty sports 5 continues, quicker enemies and movement. Other modes include local co-op through the arcade campaign, a Arena mode where players compete for leaderboard rankings under increasingly tougher stipulations, and a Single World mode that allows players to cherry pick individual levels. Conclusion Those itching for new twin-stick arcade shooter to sink into, or Smash TV/Robotron fans curious about a modernized take on that style, should definitely give Nex Machina a look. Offering an enjoyable, pulse-pounding experience layered with a satisfying, if not sometimes overwhelming, challenge, it's a quality shooter that successfully invokes the glory days of arcades. No matter how infuriating Nex Machina becomes, you’ll find yourself continually picking up the controller you just threw for one more run. Just be sure to bring a Gandhi-level of patience on top of Spider-Man-like reflexes and everything should be gravy. Nex Machina was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and is also available now for PC. View full article
  9. Review: Nex Machina

    My hands ache, palms are sweaty. I let out a huge sigh of relief as the final boss explodes into a confetti of voxels and vibrant particle effects. How many lives did I throw at that thing before I finally managed to take it down? A few dozen? Sounds about right. Although the journey was exhilarating romp, it was also draining test of hand-eye coordination and reflexes. That about sums up Nex Machina: an addictive arcade shooter with a blistering challenge that occasionally gets too tough for its own good. Housemarque knows how to craft arcade shooters that keep players coming back for more. The studio’s past works, Super Stardust HD and Resogun, are among the best modern takes on the genre. With Nex Machina, the studio has assembled perhaps its most arduous game yet by teaming up with Robotron/Smash TV mastermind Eugene Jarvis. The influence of those arcade classics are immediately evident. Players mow down waves upon waves of enemies from a top-down, third person perspective. Clearing one arena teleports players to the next, and so on until you reach the world’s boss. Nex Machina is a fast-paced, no-nonsense affair right out of the gate. I died within the first few seconds thanks to how swiftly enemies swarm players from all sides, sometimes in Galaga-esque serpentine patterns, other times in messy groups. If fending off a dozen hostile creatures wasn’t enough, you’re often doing so while simultaneously avoiding spinning laser beams, screen-filling projectile waves, and long-range mortar fire. Nex Machina revels in throwing everything but the kitchen sink at players and letting your guard down for even a nanosecond results in an explosive demise The game is demanding, sometimes to a fault, but it’s supremely satisfying to outmaneuver and outgun seemingly insurmountable opposition. Watching targets burst into tiny cubes adds to that thrill thanks to the crisp voxel graphics and destructible environments. Multiple secrets lay within each arena, most within objects like breakable cubes and boulders. The game lacks a tutorial, betting on players to blast away everything in sight and discover things on their own–an assumption quickly proven accurate. A fun and devilish layer of challenge comes in seeking out these collectibles. Since eradicating foes automatically warps you to the next room, completionists must intentionally stay their trigger finger in order to stick around and thoroughly inspect an area. However, doing this increases your likelihood of getting killed. So do you quickly mow down foes in the name of swift progression or put everything on the line for maximum points? The best example of this decision-making comes from rescuing humans from the clutches of aliens ala Resogun. Gathering them all feels awesome, but going out of my way to do so cost me countless lives. Sometimes I was forced to abandon humans in the interest of completing a merciless zone–a decision I always hated. No matter how frustrating this task got, I felt compelled to perform better just to spite Nex Machina and prove that I could not only win but do so in style, even if that didn’t always work out. While I found Nex Machina to be generally fair despite its difficulty, cheap deaths weren’t a complete non-factor. Some questionable respawns occasionally drop players directly in harm's way, such as in front of turrets, killing them before they have a chance to react. This problem rears its head most in busy situations where’s there’s no real safe spot to drop into. The small character can easily be lost among packed crowds, creating an infuriating game of Where’s Waldo that made me feel cheated when I failed due a loss of visuals rather than a lack of skill. Another issue is the lack of saving in the arcade campaign. Once started, it must be completed in one sitting, otherwise players start over from the beginning. I learned this the hard way after I completed the third world and closed the game, assuming I’d be checkpointed at the beginning of world four upon my return. To my horror, I was greeted by the first world’s opening motorcycle sequence. I get the old-school arcade mentality behind this design, and, thankfully, worlds can be completed in roughly 10 minutes (depending on how much you die). However, it's annoying to be forced to commit like that. I hit several rough spots that caused me to tap out for a breather, forcing me to leave my PS4 in rest mode for long stretches since I couldn’t shut off the game entirely. Nex Machina does a nice job of accommodating each skill-level of player without dumbing down the core experience. Rookie allots unlimited continues for those who want to see the entire game with the freedom of failing as much as required. Experienced grants 99 continues (which burn away far quicker than believed), Veteran grants a mere 10 continues and tougher foes, and the unlockable Master difficulty sports 5 continues, quicker enemies and movement. Other modes include local co-op through the arcade campaign, a Arena mode where players compete for leaderboard rankings under increasingly tougher stipulations, and a Single World mode that allows players to cherry pick individual levels. Conclusion Those itching for new twin-stick arcade shooter to sink into, or Smash TV/Robotron fans curious about a modernized take on that style, should definitely give Nex Machina a look. Offering an enjoyable, pulse-pounding experience layered with a satisfying, if not sometimes overwhelming, challenge, it's a quality shooter that successfully invokes the glory days of arcades. No matter how infuriating Nex Machina becomes, you’ll find yourself continually picking up the controller you just threw for one more run. Just be sure to bring a Gandhi-level of patience on top of Spider-Man-like reflexes and everything should be gravy. Nex Machina was reviewed on PlayStation 4 and is also available now for PC.
  10. In Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice, players must not only confront worldly adversaries but the trials of the mind. Senua suffers from schizophrenia, and during her journey to Hell to save her lover, her psychotic episodes manifest into surreal, sometimes terrifying forms that blur the line between dream and reality. Developer Ninja Theory released a new trailer highlighting such a scenario. Is the horrific entity in the trailer real or another fabrication of Senua's psychosis? Check out the video and decide for yourself. Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice arrives digitally to PlayStation 4 and PC on August 8. View full article
  11. In Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice, players must not only confront worldly adversaries but the trials of the mind. Senua suffers from schizophrenia, and during her journey to Hell to save her lover, her psychotic episodes manifest into surreal, sometimes terrifying forms that blur the line between dream and reality. Developer Ninja Theory released a new trailer highlighting such a scenario. Is the horrific entity in the trailer real or another fabrication of Senua's psychosis? Check out the video and decide for yourself. Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice arrives digitally to PlayStation 4 and PC on August 8.
  12. On August 29th, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One owners can experience the spiritual successor to Baldur's Gate, Pillars of Eternity. Pillars of Eternity: Complete Edition will include all released patches and DLC. Players will be able to play both the base game as well as the two-part expansion The White March. Obsidian has updated the game for controller play including a revamped, TV-friendly user interface and menus. Check out the trailer for the Complete Edition below. Did you miss out on Pillars of Eternity on PC? Let us know if you'll pick up the console version in the comments below. View full article
  13. On August 29th, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One owners can experience the spiritual successor to Baldur's Gate, Pillars of Eternity. Pillars of Eternity: Complete Edition will include all released patches and DLC. Players will be able to play both the base game as well as the two-part expansion The White March. Obsidian has updated the game for controller play including a revamped, TV-friendly user interface and menus. Check out the trailer for the Complete Edition below. Did you miss out on Pillars of Eternity on PC? Let us know if you'll pick up the console version in the comments below.
  14. God of War's Norse setting, family-focused story, and presence of Kratos' son aren't the only big changes for upcoming sequel. The game also features a dramatically altered presentation thanks to a single, behind-the-shoulder camera that replaces the series' classic fixed camera angles. In an interview with Eurogamer, Game Director Corey Balrog, lead animator on God of War I, director of God of War II, and script writer for God of War III before departing Sony Santa Monica, discussed in-depth the motivation for the team to change the camera angle: The aspiration when I got back was to tell a much more personal story. God of War is traditionally known for these cinematic, pull back cameras, which I think are fantastic. But trying to get in there and really get to know the character a little more, I realized it'd be interesting if we got closer. [...] There was big [internal] resistance, but I have probably one of the best teams in the business, so as much as they were pushing back, I think they all kind of wanted this crazy challenge. Balrog also addressed concerns about the player's control over the camera, something fans of the series seem to be divided on: The player won't always have control, although that was the aspiration at the beginning. We eventually got hit by the sobering reality that sometimes you just have to nudge the player and let them see what you want them to see, but it's always a nudge. You always give them a little bit of a sense of freedom, so that it does feel like you're experiencing all of this in real time. Balrog's motivations are radically shaking up the God of War formula for the next entry, defying fan expectations and how leaving Santa Monica during God of War III's development helped mature him as a writer and director. God of War releases in March 2018. You can watch the game's latest trailer from Sony E3 2017 presentation here. View full article
  15. God of War's Norse setting, family-focused story, and presence of Kratos' son aren't the only big changes for upcoming sequel. The game also features a dramatically altered presentation thanks to a single, behind-the-shoulder camera that replaces the series' classic fixed camera angles. In an interview with Eurogamer, Game Director Corey Balrog, lead animator on God of War I, director of God of War II, and script writer for God of War III before departing Sony Santa Monica, discussed in-depth the motivation for the team to change the camera angle: The aspiration when I got back was to tell a much more personal story. God of War is traditionally known for these cinematic, pull back cameras, which I think are fantastic. But trying to get in there and really get to know the character a little more, I realized it'd be interesting if we got closer. [...] There was big [internal] resistance, but I have probably one of the best teams in the business, so as much as they were pushing back, I think they all kind of wanted this crazy challenge. Balrog also addressed concerns about the player's control over the camera, something fans of the series seem to be divided on: The player won't always have control, although that was the aspiration at the beginning. We eventually got hit by the sobering reality that sometimes you just have to nudge the player and let them see what you want them to see, but it's always a nudge. You always give them a little bit of a sense of freedom, so that it does feel like you're experiencing all of this in real time. Balrog's motivations are radically shaking up the God of War formula for the next entry, defying fan expectations and how leaving Santa Monica during God of War III's development helped mature him as a writer and director. God of War releases in March 2018. You can watch the game's latest trailer from Sony E3 2017 presentation here.
  16. The concept of creating cinema in virtual reality is still in its infancy, but those interested in the format's potential can check out the first short film from London-based VR studio, Breaking Fourth. Titled Ctrl, the film is coming to PlayStation VR and centers on a young e-sports player named Liam, who competes in a strategy game tournament where viewers have "front row seats" to the action. However, Liam may be fighting for much more than just a tournament victory. According to Breaking Fourth, Ctrl aims to explores "themes of power, control and escapism...whilst forcing you to confront the unrelenting nature of the character’s reality – and as the plot develops, you may find yourself reflecting on your own experiences…" The film was shot in full 360 degrees, offering watchers a completely immersive experience. You can get a feel for Ctrl by checking out its trailer below. PlayStation VR owners intrigued by the project will be able to download Ctrl from the PlayStation Store this Friday, June 23rd. You can read more about the movie by reading Breaking Fourth's PlayStation Blog post. View full article
  17. The concept of creating cinema in virtual reality is still in its infancy, but those interested in the format's potential can check out the first short film from London-based VR studio, Breaking Fourth. Titled Ctrl, the film is coming to PlayStation VR and centers on a young e-sports player named Liam, who competes in a strategy game tournament where viewers have "front row seats" to the action. However, Liam may be fighting for much more than just a tournament victory. According to Breaking Fourth, Ctrl aims to explores "themes of power, control and escapism...whilst forcing you to confront the unrelenting nature of the character’s reality – and as the plot develops, you may find yourself reflecting on your own experiences…" The film was shot in full 360 degrees, offering watchers a completely immersive experience. You can get a feel for Ctrl by checking out its trailer below. PlayStation VR owners intrigued by the project will be able to download Ctrl from the PlayStation Store this Friday, June 23rd. You can read more about the movie by reading Breaking Fourth's PlayStation Blog post.
  18. Knack was the poster-child for the typical launch game: a decent showcase of the PS4’s technical capabilities while just being serviceable as an entertaining video game. While I feel Knack receives more vitriol than it probably deserves, the throwback-style platformer also didn’t light my world on fire enough to have me salivating over a sequel. But that’s what we’re getting, and after playing Knack 2 at E3 2017, I'm not convinced that there's much there to sufficiently separate itself from its predecessor. Knack 2’s primary hook is the addition of two-player co-op. Players can romp through the colorful world together, whether from the outset or during single play thanks to a drop-in/drop-out feature. Platforming makes my soul smile, so I coerced my fellow attendee into choosing the traversal-focused opening segment (the other available level was an action-heavy combat showcase). Knack 2’s mechanics and design are identical to the first game save for a new shield Knack can conjure to repel attacks, adding a wrinkle of depth to the beat-em-up-style combat. The cooperative gameplay design featured in this slice was nothing remarkable. Seesaw platforms, ziplines across gaps, floors that dip in and out of walls. It sounds like I’m skipping details, but I really can’t think of anything mechanics worth discussing in-depth. Knack 2’s challenge mainly derived from my less-than-skilled partner struggling to keep up with me (not his fault. I’m quite adept at platformers). Thankfully, hitting the right trigger lets players instantly warp alongside their companions, which helped keep our adventure rolling along. A team-up attack is also present, although there weren't any enemies worth using it on. We did, however, gang up on some unsuspecting crystals and crates. As we hopped about and pummeled anything that wasn’t made out of metallic Toblerones, I couldn’t help feeling I’d had my fill of the game once the demo wrapped up. Everything felt like an extended déjà vu sequence guest starring a stranger, and nothing presented in my particular demo (I never got around to the combat scenario) compelled me to want to play another Knack game. Co-op worked well enough and should be welcome addition for fans, though that’s primarily because most games are inherently more fun with someone else and not because anything Knack 2 did with the feature. We’ll see how everything comes together when Knack 2 launches September 5. But unless you’re a diehard Knack enthusiast or feel deprived of 3D platformers and will take anything, I wouldn’t expect much to get you on board if you weren’t keen on the first title. View full article
  19. Knack was the poster-child for the typical launch game: a decent showcase of the PS4’s technical capabilities while just being serviceable as an entertaining video game. While I feel Knack receives more vitriol than it probably deserves, the throwback-style platformer also didn’t light my world on fire enough to have me salivating over a sequel. But that’s what we’re getting, and after playing Knack 2 at E3 2017, I'm not convinced that there's much there to sufficiently separate itself from its predecessor. Knack 2’s primary hook is the addition of two-player co-op. Players can romp through the colorful world together, whether from the outset or during single play thanks to a drop-in/drop-out feature. Platforming makes my soul smile, so I coerced my fellow attendee into choosing the traversal-focused opening segment (the other available level was an action-heavy combat showcase). Knack 2’s mechanics and design are identical to the first game save for a new shield Knack can conjure to repel attacks, adding a wrinkle of depth to the beat-em-up-style combat. The cooperative gameplay design featured in this slice was nothing remarkable. Seesaw platforms, ziplines across gaps, floors that dip in and out of walls. It sounds like I’m skipping details, but I really can’t think of anything mechanics worth discussing in-depth. Knack 2’s challenge mainly derived from my less-than-skilled partner struggling to keep up with me (not his fault. I’m quite adept at platformers). Thankfully, hitting the right trigger lets players instantly warp alongside their companions, which helped keep our adventure rolling along. A team-up attack is also present, although there weren't any enemies worth using it on. We did, however, gang up on some unsuspecting crystals and crates. As we hopped about and pummeled anything that wasn’t made out of metallic Toblerones, I couldn’t help feeling I’d had my fill of the game once the demo wrapped up. Everything felt like an extended déjà vu sequence guest starring a stranger, and nothing presented in my particular demo (I never got around to the combat scenario) compelled me to want to play another Knack game. Co-op worked well enough and should be welcome addition for fans, though that’s primarily because most games are inherently more fun with someone else and not because anything Knack 2 did with the feature. We’ll see how everything comes together when Knack 2 launches September 5. But unless you’re a diehard Knack enthusiast or feel deprived of 3D platformers and will take anything, I wouldn’t expect much to get you on board if you weren’t keen on the first title.
  20. A new vision of Kratos first reemerged at E3 2016. He appeared older, grayer and wiser, accompanied by a new companion: his young son. This year's E3 saw an expanded look into title's new Norse setting and its mythical inhabitants. Kratos is imparting his warrior wisdom onto his young son, exposing both his merciless and brutal side along with flickers of compassion. "You said I was cursed," Kratos' son says, "you think I'm weak because I'm not like you." He and his father are on an unknown quest, and during that journey they run into plenty of new, ferocious enemies. This trailer gives players a deeper look into what to expect from this dramatic departure from the previous the God of War titles. A large part of that seems to revolve around Kratos' son, and "the truth." While Kratos handles the combat side of things, his son proves his worth by translating the native dialect. "He wants to help us," Kratos' son replies after he is asked to interpret the words of a colossal beast at the end of the trailer, potentially revealing at least a portion of his origins. God of War releases for PlayStation 4 in early 2018. What do you think about this radical shift in the popular action series? View full article
  21. A new vision of Kratos first reemerged at E3 2016. He appeared older, grayer and wiser, accompanied by a new companion: his young son. This year's E3 saw an expanded look into title's new Norse setting and its mythical inhabitants. Kratos is imparting his warrior wisdom onto his young son, exposing both his merciless and brutal side along with flickers of compassion. "You said I was cursed," Kratos' son says, "you think I'm weak because I'm not like you." He and his father are on an unknown quest, and during that journey they run into plenty of new, ferocious enemies. This trailer gives players a deeper look into what to expect from this dramatic departure from the previous the God of War titles. A large part of that seems to revolve around Kratos' son, and "the truth." While Kratos handles the combat side of things, his son proves his worth by translating the native dialect. "He wants to help us," Kratos' son replies after he is asked to interpret the words of a colossal beast at the end of the trailer, potentially revealing at least a portion of his origins. God of War releases for PlayStation 4 in early 2018. What do you think about this radical shift in the popular action series?
  22. One of the main focuses of the Sony E3 2017 press conference was showcasing support for its VR headset. Keep reading below to see all of the upcoming games coming to PSVR. Sure to please a slew of Elder Scrolls fans, Sony started out its VR showcase with Skyrim in VR. In the trailer, we got to see various combat systems including the title's signature dragon shouts. Next up was Star Child, a third-person new IP with a sci-fi setting appropriate for its name. Final Fantasy XV Monster of the Deep focuses on the fishing mini-game from the main game. The game has a release date of September 2017. The Inpatient explores a vintage mental asylum and teases "discover who you are before it’s too late." The setting is familiar to those who have played Until Dawn. Players will be in Blackwood Sanatorium 60 years before the events of Until Dawn. Bravo Team is a first person shooter set in a "fictional " modern day Eastern European city. The last of the VR games of the 2017 conference was a title called Moss that focused on a mouse. The adorable little critter roams around in a fantastical natural world. Which games are you excited for in VR? What titles do you want to see? View full article
  23. One of the main focuses of the Sony E3 2017 press conference was showcasing support for its VR headset. Keep reading below to see all of the upcoming games coming to PSVR. Sure to please a slew of Elder Scrolls fans, Sony started out its VR showcase with Skyrim in VR. In the trailer, we got to see various combat systems including the title's signature dragon shouts. Next up was Star Child, a third-person new IP with a sci-fi setting appropriate for its name. Final Fantasy XV Monster of the Deep focuses on the fishing mini-game from the main game. The game has a release date of September 2017. The Inpatient explores a vintage mental asylum and teases "discover who you are before it’s too late." The setting is familiar to those who have played Until Dawn. Players will be in Blackwood Sanatorium 60 years before the events of Until Dawn. Bravo Team is a first person shooter set in a "fictional " modern day Eastern European city. The last of the VR games of the 2017 conference was a title called Moss that focused on a mouse. The adorable little critter roams around in a fantastical natural world. Which games are you excited for in VR? What titles do you want to see?
  24. Uncharted: The Lost Legacy kicked off Sony's E3 festivities with a new story trailer. Releasing August 22, the adventure stars series favorite Chloe Frazer and Uncharted 4's tough-as-nails mercenary boss Nadine Ross as they search for the legendary Tusk of Ganesh. Gameplay featured in the trailer is the standard action-packed fare we have come to expect from the Uncharted series, but what seems to set the game apart from its brethren is the tense relationship between the two treasure hunters. The two characters seem to have an unwilling but necessary partnership. Official copy for the game describes their adventuring as such: "along the way, they’ll learn to work together to unearth the mystery of the artifact, fight their way through fierce opposition, and prevent the region from falling into chaos." How do you feel about this expansion into the Uncharted universe? View full article
  25. Uncharted: The Lost Legacy kicked off Sony's E3 festivities with a new story trailer. Releasing August 22, the adventure stars series favorite Chloe Frazer and Uncharted 4's tough-as-nails mercenary boss Nadine Ross as they search for the legendary Tusk of Ganesh. Gameplay featured in the trailer is the standard action-packed fare we have come to expect from the Uncharted series, but what seems to set the game apart from its brethren is the tense relationship between the two treasure hunters. The two characters seem to have an unwilling but necessary partnership. Official copy for the game describes their adventuring as such: "along the way, they’ll learn to work together to unearth the mystery of the artifact, fight their way through fierce opposition, and prevent the region from falling into chaos." How do you feel about this expansion into the Uncharted universe?