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Found 513 results

  1. Praise the sun! Okami makes the jump to current-gen consoles this December. The Capcom published critically acclaimed action-adventure game originally released for the PlayStation 2 back in 2006. Since then, it has been ported to Wii and PlayStation 3. Now, Clover Studio's classic will be available in HD with the option to switch between a more modern widescreen presentation or the original 4:3 ratio. In Okami, players become Amaterasu, the goddess of the sun who becomes a white wolf and sets off on a quest to defeat Orochi, an eight-headed demon bent on destroying the world of Nippon. Okami HD releases on December 12 for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.
  2. Praise the sun! Okami makes the jump to current-gen consoles this December. The Capcom published critically acclaimed action-adventure game originally released for the PlayStation 2 back in 2006. Since then, it has been ported to Wii and PlayStation 3. Now, Clover Studio's classic will be available in HD with the option to switch between a more modern widescreen presentation or the original 4:3 ratio. In Okami, players become Amaterasu, the goddess of the sun who becomes a white wolf and sets off on a quest to defeat Orochi, an eight-headed demon bent on destroying the world of Nippon. Okami HD releases on December 12 for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. View full article
  3. Just three years ago, This War of Mine released on PC to relate the experience of civilians struggling to survive in the midst of war. The indie game developed by 11 bit studios has continued to receive support over the years in the form of translations and expansions. However, 11 bit has undertaken a new effort to bring life back to their dramatic survival title. The initiative, called This War of Mine Stories, aims to bring a number of narrative adventures to life. Father's Promise will be the first of these DLC expansions. It uses the framework of This War of Mine to weave the compelling tale of Adam, a man trying to protect his daughter and escape from their war-torn city. 11 bit studios based Father's Promise on an audio-drama by author Łukasz Orbitowski. Orbitowski has won awards for his literary accomplishments and has been hailed as "a Polish Steven King." It is unclear whether future Stories DLC will also be based on Orbitowski's work or if they will draw from other sources of inspiration. Father's Promise is available now for $1.99 or can be obtained by purchasing a season pass for all This War of Mine Stories for $4.99.
  4. Just three years ago, This War of Mine released on PC to relate the experience of civilians struggling to survive in the midst of war. The indie game developed by 11 bit studios has continued to receive support over the years in the form of translations and expansions. However, 11 bit has undertaken a new effort to bring life back to their dramatic survival title. The initiative, called This War of Mine Stories, aims to bring a number of narrative adventures to life. Father's Promise will be the first of these DLC expansions. It uses the framework of This War of Mine to weave the compelling tale of Adam, a man trying to protect his daughter and escape from their war-torn city. 11 bit studios based Father's Promise on an audio-drama by author Łukasz Orbitowski. Orbitowski has won awards for his literary accomplishments and has been hailed as "a Polish Steven King." It is unclear whether future Stories DLC will also be based on Orbitowski's work or if they will draw from other sources of inspiration. Father's Promise is available now for $1.99 or can be obtained by purchasing a season pass for all This War of Mine Stories for $4.99. View full article
  5. The recently released Elex is, quite simply, a painful slog of an RPG. At turns charmingly sloppy and infuriatingly obtuse, it feels like a bumbled combination of Dark Souls, The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, and Mad Max. Elex stands as proof that you can create a world that pits magic Vikings, drugged up wasteland raiders, technologically advanced religious zealots, and magically enhanced super mutants against one another and somehow still render it all boring. How does it accomplish this feat? Read on. Elex takes a step in the wrong direction right off the bat with its protagonist. Commander Jax takes on the central role of this adventure. He's part of the Albs, a society of enhanced mutants that have purged themselves of all emotion in exchange for the massive power granted by a substance known as elex. However, we don't know any of that as in the opening seconds we see Jax's sci-fi fighter jet get shot down by unknown people for unknown reasons. The backstory to this scene gets inexplicably doled out in small doses via flashbacks to years before the events of the game. We have a protagonist without emotional responses to anything and a blank backstory. Jax does have one interesting spark of characterization, though. Severed from his connection to his fellow Albs, Jax slowly begins to either regain a connection to his emotions or not depending how the player behaves. Unfortunately, that aspect of the character never really feels explored, leaving Jax an incredibly bland and uninteresting lead. After being shot down in enemy territory, emotionless Jax embarks on a quest to get revenge. A bland protagonist might be something a game could survive if the supporting cast can shoulder the extra weight. Elex's writing and NPCs simply can't bear that burden. The dialogue hamstrings any attempt to build up other characters. The very first interaction the player has with an NPC results in that character explaining several times in the same dialogue tree that the player can find supplies in the nearby town. Did you know you could get supplies in town? Hey, no worries, you can get supplies in town. You can take some jobs and gear up in town. It never really becomes better as the game progresses, either. Sometimes characters will seemingly glitch over dialogue or have wild mood swings between dialogue options. One of the NPC companions went from feeling neutral towards Jax to idolizing him over the course of one conversation on one sidequest. On a different quest, I selected a seemingly innocuous dialogue option that prompted an NPC to attempt to murder Jax - and the game warned me after I killed him that the game had been altered significantly. Combat stands as one of the weakest elements of Elex. Despite existing in a world of hand grenades and plasma rifles, melee weapons serve as the primary way players deal damage in the world. Those who want to rely on ranged attacks will quickly find them weak, especially early on, and this can quickly lead to being mauled on all sides. That leaves players to rely on melee or the various faction abilities. In order to access magic, psionic powers, or chemical augments players will have to ally themselves with one of the game's three factions: the Berserkers, the Clerics, or the Outlaws. If you haven't allied with one of the three groups, generic combat will be the only option available. That leaves melee, which seems to be aiming for a Dark Souls-like rhythm, but fails spectacularly. Players must manage their stamina to make sure they can dodge or defend against enemy attack patterns. If attacks are properly managed, a special attack can be performed to deal critical damage. These attacks locks Jax into prolonged animations that frequently miss their target, leaving him vulnerable. This can be a huge problem in a game where even low level enemies on the easiest difficulty can take a player from full life to death in a handful of attacks. With such life and death stakes, the spotty hit detection becomes an unending source of irritation. I died several times from attacks that hit a visible distance away from Jax's character model. Important note: For a very, very, very long time after beginning the game, Jax will be weak. If you truly want to explore the open world of Elex and meet the other factions, you will encounter enemies capable of instantly killing Jax. Those deaths might occur with little to no warning, too, as many enemies are simply leveled higher from the initial areas - meaning you'll only know that they are different from the enemies you've defeated handily before when you get close enough to target them and see a skull by their names. Jax's weakness might be remedied by an empowering leveling system. The leveling system in Elex somehow manages to be a convoluted mess. Each level gives you 10 points to spend on character attributes and a learning point that can be spent at the various trainers throughout the world to learn new active and passive abilities. Attribute requirements are tied to each ability and each piece of armor and weapon in the game. If you want to have better armor, you need to gain a new level and put points into the required attributes. I'm sure there must be mid-tier weapons somewhere in Elex, but I couldn't find anything that seemed meaningfully different or more powerful from the blunt axe I found during the first hour of the game after having played the game for over a dozen hours. The weapons that I did manage to scrounge up all had requirements far beyond what I could equip. So, naturally, I put points into those areas to try to be able to use something better than that axe. The downside of that approach was that I couldn't put points into things like constitution, which meant I couldn't equip better armor or shields. Even when I finally managed to have the points in dexterity and strength required to shoot a plasma rifle, I was sorely disappointed to learn that at best it only tickled most enemies. This led me to a the following conclusion: In the world of Elex a level 0 blunt axe is somehow more powerful and effective than using a plasma rifle that requires 50 dexterity and 30 strength. Elex's story offers a great degree of flexibility. That flexibility goes to waste in a world that squanders a lot of intriguing concepts and potential by linking it with bland characters and fetch quests that exist to waste time. I bring that up to point out that Elex asks players to join one of the factions - but a player looking to make an informed decision without faffing about in the area with magic Vikings forever will have to make their way through almost certain death to reach the Clerics and the Outlaws to see if joining them might be preferable. A single sidequest might require fifteen minutes of running through the wilderness. Traveling between settlements could take much longer. Dying en route puts you back at the point of the game's last autosave, which can result in hours of lost time. To alleviate this, fast travel teleportation pads exist throughout the world. However, they can also be easy to miss and remain deactivated if the player doesn't walk on top of them. This problem even seems to be recognized in the game design since one of the generic abilities (with insanely high requirements) reveals all of the teleportation pads in the world. I would not recommend Elex to anyone. It manages to trick the player into forgetting about its frustrations by playing the way one would expect from a middle-of-the-road RPG with grand ambitions, but it invariably falls into some new pitfall included in the game either by poorly conceived design or by complete accident. The setting holds a great deal of promise, but the narrative often finds itself too caught up in world building to remember that compelling characters are necessary. The dialogue manages to be uniformly atrocious and grating. The visuals look great from a distance, but closer inspection reveals a lot of characters and environments to be pretty ugly. Glitches routinely pop up - one time I initiated a conversation with an NPC and Jax teleported halfway through the ceiling and remained trapped there after the conversation finished. Other than an intriguing premise and a fun trailer, Elex has very little going for it. Elex is available for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.
  6. The recently released Elex is, quite simply, a painful slog of an RPG. At turns charmingly sloppy and infuriatingly obtuse, it feels like a bumbled combination of Dark Souls, The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, and Mad Max. Elex stands as proof that you can create a world that pits magic Vikings, drugged up wasteland raiders, technologically advanced religious zealots, and magically enhanced super mutants against one another and somehow still render it all boring. How does it accomplish this feat? Read on. Elex takes a step in the wrong direction right off the bat with its protagonist. Commander Jax takes on the central role of this adventure. He's part of the Albs, a society of enhanced mutants that have purged themselves of all emotion in exchange for the massive power granted by a substance known as elex. However, we don't know any of that as in the opening seconds we see Jax's sci-fi fighter jet get shot down by unknown people for unknown reasons. The backstory to this scene gets inexplicably doled out in small doses via flashbacks to years before the events of the game. We have a protagonist without emotional responses to anything and a blank backstory. Jax does have one interesting spark of characterization, though. Severed from his connection to his fellow Albs, Jax slowly begins to either regain a connection to his emotions or not depending how the player behaves. Unfortunately, that aspect of the character never really feels explored, leaving Jax an incredibly bland and uninteresting lead. After being shot down in enemy territory, emotionless Jax embarks on a quest to get revenge. A bland protagonist might be something a game could survive if the supporting cast can shoulder the extra weight. Elex's writing and NPCs simply can't bear that burden. The dialogue hamstrings any attempt to build up other characters. The very first interaction the player has with an NPC results in that character explaining several times in the same dialogue tree that the player can find supplies in the nearby town. Did you know you could get supplies in town? Hey, no worries, you can get supplies in town. You can take some jobs and gear up in town. It never really becomes better as the game progresses, either. Sometimes characters will seemingly glitch over dialogue or have wild mood swings between dialogue options. One of the NPC companions went from feeling neutral towards Jax to idolizing him over the course of one conversation on one sidequest. On a different quest, I selected a seemingly innocuous dialogue option that prompted an NPC to attempt to murder Jax - and the game warned me after I killed him that the game had been altered significantly. Combat stands as one of the weakest elements of Elex. Despite existing in a world of hand grenades and plasma rifles, melee weapons serve as the primary way players deal damage in the world. Those who want to rely on ranged attacks will quickly find them weak, especially early on, and this can quickly lead to being mauled on all sides. That leaves players to rely on melee or the various faction abilities. In order to access magic, psionic powers, or chemical augments players will have to ally themselves with one of the game's three factions: the Berserkers, the Clerics, or the Outlaws. If you haven't allied with one of the three groups, generic combat will be the only option available. That leaves melee, which seems to be aiming for a Dark Souls-like rhythm, but fails spectacularly. Players must manage their stamina to make sure they can dodge or defend against enemy attack patterns. If attacks are properly managed, a special attack can be performed to deal critical damage. These attacks locks Jax into prolonged animations that frequently miss their target, leaving him vulnerable. This can be a huge problem in a game where even low level enemies on the easiest difficulty can take a player from full life to death in a handful of attacks. With such life and death stakes, the spotty hit detection becomes an unending source of irritation. I died several times from attacks that hit a visible distance away from Jax's character model. Important note: For a very, very, very long time after beginning the game, Jax will be weak. If you truly want to explore the open world of Elex and meet the other factions, you will encounter enemies capable of instantly killing Jax. Those deaths might occur with little to no warning, too, as many enemies are simply leveled higher from the initial areas - meaning you'll only know that they are different from the enemies you've defeated handily before when you get close enough to target them and see a skull by their names. Jax's weakness might be remedied by an empowering leveling system. The leveling system in Elex somehow manages to be a convoluted mess. Each level gives you 10 points to spend on character attributes and a learning point that can be spent at the various trainers throughout the world to learn new active and passive abilities. Attribute requirements are tied to each ability and each piece of armor and weapon in the game. If you want to have better armor, you need to gain a new level and put points into the required attributes. I'm sure there must be mid-tier weapons somewhere in Elex, but I couldn't find anything that seemed meaningfully different or more powerful from the blunt axe I found during the first hour of the game after having played the game for over a dozen hours. The weapons that I did manage to scrounge up all had requirements far beyond what I could equip. So, naturally, I put points into those areas to try to be able to use something better than that axe. The downside of that approach was that I couldn't put points into things like constitution, which meant I couldn't equip better armor or shields. Even when I finally managed to have the points in dexterity and strength required to shoot a plasma rifle, I was sorely disappointed to learn that at best it only tickled most enemies. This led me to a the following conclusion: In the world of Elex a level 0 blunt axe is somehow more powerful and effective than using a plasma rifle that requires 50 dexterity and 30 strength. Elex's story offers a great degree of flexibility. That flexibility goes to waste in a world that squanders a lot of intriguing concepts and potential by linking it with bland characters and fetch quests that exist to waste time. I bring that up to point out that Elex asks players to join one of the factions - but a player looking to make an informed decision without faffing about in the area with magic Vikings forever will have to make their way through almost certain death to reach the Clerics and the Outlaws to see if joining them might be preferable. A single sidequest might require fifteen minutes of running through the wilderness. Traveling between settlements could take much longer. Dying en route puts you back at the point of the game's last autosave, which can result in hours of lost time. To alleviate this, fast travel teleportation pads exist throughout the world. However, they can also be easy to miss and remain deactivated if the player doesn't walk on top of them. This problem even seems to be recognized in the game design since one of the generic abilities (with insanely high requirements) reveals all of the teleportation pads in the world. I would not recommend Elex to anyone. It manages to trick the player into forgetting about its frustrations by playing the way one would expect from a middle-of-the-road RPG with grand ambitions, but it invariably falls into some new pitfall included in the game either by poorly conceived design or by complete accident. The setting holds a great deal of promise, but the narrative often finds itself too caught up in world building to remember that compelling characters are necessary. The dialogue manages to be uniformly atrocious and grating. The visuals look great from a distance, but closer inspection reveals a lot of characters and environments to be pretty ugly. Glitches routinely pop up - one time I initiated a conversation with an NPC and Jax teleported halfway through the ceiling and remained trapped there after the conversation finished. Other than an intriguing premise and a fun trailer, Elex has very little going for it. Elex is available for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. View full article
  7. Natsume is gearing up for the launch of Harvest Moon: Light of Hope, the first game in the franchise's 20 year history to release on PC. Though Light of Hope will also release for Nintendo Switch and PlayStation 4, the PC version has been finished ahead of schedule and will release this year with the console versions following in 2018. "Due to the hard work of our team, development for Harvest Moon: Light of Hope for PC ran ahead of schedule, allowing us to release the game early to PC players," said Hiro Maekawa, President & CEO of Natsume. "We have enjoyed creating an all-new game that honors 20 years of Harvest Moon, and what's more, the franchise will finally be available for the first time on PC, something fans have long asked for!" Light of Hope has players shipwrecked and washed up in a small harbor town devastated by the same storm that sunk the player's ship. With a small farm, players can help to rebuild the town and rekindle the lighthouse. Natsume has been trying to put the past two decades of Harvest Moon on full display in the newest game with familiar faces from previous titles making appearances along with the familiar gameplay players have been itching for. The newest and most interesting mechanic is the ability to slowly unlock the town by repairing its damaged structures, bringing new opportunities and characters with each repaired building. A point of contention among some fans, Light of Hope will be making use of what Natsume has dubbed a retro plus aesthetic. The visuals aim to recapture an SNES feel while putting a modern twist on everything. Some vocal fans haven't been too pleased with the aesthetic, but the graphics undoubtedly look unique. In celebration of the series' 20th anniversary, Natsume has decided to hold a drawing contest on their Facebook page. They want fans to submit original drawings of their favorite Harvest Moon characters, animals, and events before 2017 comes to a close. Fifteen winners will be chosen, and each will receive some special Natsume prizes. Harvest Moon: Light of Hope releases on November 14 for PC and early 2018 for PS4 and Switch.
  8. Natsume is gearing up for the launch of Harvest Moon: Light of Hope, the first game in the franchise's 20 year history to release on PC. Though Light of Hope will also release for Nintendo Switch and PlayStation 4, the PC version has been finished ahead of schedule and will release this year with the console versions following in 2018. "Due to the hard work of our team, development for Harvest Moon: Light of Hope for PC ran ahead of schedule, allowing us to release the game early to PC players," said Hiro Maekawa, President & CEO of Natsume. "We have enjoyed creating an all-new game that honors 20 years of Harvest Moon, and what's more, the franchise will finally be available for the first time on PC, something fans have long asked for!" Light of Hope has players shipwrecked and washed up in a small harbor town devastated by the same storm that sunk the player's ship. With a small farm, players can help to rebuild the town and rekindle the lighthouse. Natsume has been trying to put the past two decades of Harvest Moon on full display in the newest game with familiar faces from previous titles making appearances along with the familiar gameplay players have been itching for. The newest and most interesting mechanic is the ability to slowly unlock the town by repairing its damaged structures, bringing new opportunities and characters with each repaired building. A point of contention among some fans, Light of Hope will be making use of what Natsume has dubbed a retro plus aesthetic. The visuals aim to recapture an SNES feel while putting a modern twist on everything. Some vocal fans haven't been too pleased with the aesthetic, but the graphics undoubtedly look unique. In celebration of the series' 20th anniversary, Natsume has decided to hold a drawing contest on their Facebook page. They want fans to submit original drawings of their favorite Harvest Moon characters, animals, and events before 2017 comes to a close. Fifteen winners will be chosen, and each will receive some special Natsume prizes. Harvest Moon: Light of Hope releases on November 14 for PC and early 2018 for PS4 and Switch. View full article
  9. I have some words for you: Motor. Cycle. Wheel. Saws. If a combination of those words caught your attention, keep an eye on the upcoming Steel Rats. The 2.5D action arcade title combines motorized combat with stunts to create retro-futuristic destruction gameplay. Motorcycles operate based on the physics of Steel Rats with customization options. Players will pilot their battle-hardened racer on sketchy streets, over near-future rooftops, and through grungy tunnels. You might be asking yourself at this point, "What exactly is a Street Rat?" The Street Rats are a punk biker gang who rule the streets of Coastal City. You might think that makes them a threat to law and order, but quite the contrary. The Street Rats are the last remaining line of defense for a city under constant siege by an oncoming army of junkbots bent on its destruction. Players can choose their own characters, unlock special moves and bikes, and fight across the near armaggeddon cityscape of their once sacred turf. The soundtrack of Steel Rats is being created by the Japanese rock trio The 5.6.7.8's who are known for their song "Woo Hoo" featured in Kill Bill: Volume 1. “Steel Rats is set in an atmospheric, stylized, retro-future version of 40s and 50s Americana,” says Jacek Gburczyk, art director on the project, “we’ve taken everything we love from America in that time period and mixed it up with our favorite parts of dieselpunk and steampunk influences to create something that has a wholly original feel and character.” A new CGI trailer released today conveys the essence of what developer Tate Multimedia envisions for their project. Steel Rats comes to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC in 2018.
  10. I have some words for you: Motor. Cycle. Wheel. Saws. If a combination of those words caught your attention, keep an eye on the upcoming Steel Rats. The 2.5D action arcade title combines motorized combat with stunts to create retro-futuristic destruction gameplay. Motorcycles operate based on the physics of Steel Rats with customization options. Players will pilot their battle-hardened racer on sketchy streets, over near-future rooftops, and through grungy tunnels. You might be asking yourself at this point, "What exactly is a Street Rat?" The Street Rats are a punk biker gang who rule the streets of Coastal City. You might think that makes them a threat to law and order, but quite the contrary. The Street Rats are the last remaining line of defense for a city under constant siege by an oncoming army of junkbots bent on its destruction. Players can choose their own characters, unlock special moves and bikes, and fight across the near armaggeddon cityscape of their once sacred turf. The soundtrack of Steel Rats is being created by the Japanese rock trio The 5.6.7.8's who are known for their song "Woo Hoo" featured in Kill Bill: Volume 1. “Steel Rats is set in an atmospheric, stylized, retro-future version of 40s and 50s Americana,” says Jacek Gburczyk, art director on the project, “we’ve taken everything we love from America in that time period and mixed it up with our favorite parts of dieselpunk and steampunk influences to create something that has a wholly original feel and character.” A new CGI trailer released today conveys the essence of what developer Tate Multimedia envisions for their project. Steel Rats comes to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC in 2018. View full article
  11. Recent years have seen the rise of visual novels in the gaming landscape, interactive stories with light "choose your own adventure" elements. If you've ever dreamed of making your own visual novel, Degica Games is gearing up to release Visual Novel Maker in November. Essentially, Visual Novel Maker follows the RPG Maker conceit of allowing someone to create what they want with little to no programming expertise. The set of tools in Visual Novel Maker includes support for click, drag and drop, or type interfaces for the stories users are itching to tell. Completed games can be played on PC, Mac, Linux, Android, and iOS. Of course what is a visual novel without the visuals? Visual Novel Maker comes with 11 different characters, each with a variety of outfits and expressions. Those characters don't exist within a black void, either, as the software tool comes with over 150 pre-made backgrounds. Those who prefer to create their own art can import it into the game or even use Live2D to include some animations. Same goes for music; a selection of pre-made tracks, but the option to add more personal music if the user desires. Experienced developers can create and add extensions to edit the game or even the toolset itself. Visual Novel Maker releases on November 16 for PC.
  12. Recent years have seen the rise of visual novels in the gaming landscape, interactive stories with light "choose your own adventure" elements. If you've ever dreamed of making your own visual novel, Degica Games is gearing up to release Visual Novel Maker in November. Essentially, Visual Novel Maker follows the RPG Maker conceit of allowing someone to create what they want with little to no programming expertise. The set of tools in Visual Novel Maker includes support for click, drag and drop, or type interfaces for the stories users are itching to tell. Completed games can be played on PC, Mac, Linux, Android, and iOS. Of course what is a visual novel without the visuals? Visual Novel Maker comes with 11 different characters, each with a variety of outfits and expressions. Those characters don't exist within a black void, either, as the software tool comes with over 150 pre-made backgrounds. Those who prefer to create their own art can import it into the game or even use Live2D to include some animations. Same goes for music; a selection of pre-made tracks, but the option to add more personal music if the user desires. Experienced developers can create and add extensions to edit the game or even the toolset itself. Visual Novel Maker releases on November 16 for PC. View full article
  13. Warhammer: Vermintide 2 Revealed

    Developer Fatshark held a livestream today in which it pulled the covers off of the sequel to Warhammer: End Times - Vermintide. The company's modest attempt at creating a medieval fantasy version of Left 4 Dead has now given way to a much more expanded universe full of all kinds of creatures and dangers beyond the Skaven rat-men who plagued the first game. The heroes from the previous game have united to take on the remnants of the Skaven army who have allied themselves with the Chaos faction. The five heroes can choose from 15 difference career paths, each with different appearances, abilities, talent trees, and equipment. This team of hardy adventurers are the only thing standing between the oncoming hordes of rat-men, Chaos, and more that seek the destruction of the empire. As you might deduce from the earlier comparison to Left 4 Dead, Vermintide 2 continues the series penchant for four player co-op. Players will need to work together either with their friends or NPCs to survive each of the 13 deadly levels that take place around the fortress city of Helmgart on the border of the Empire. Vermintide 2 will come with integrated Twitch functionality. More information about just how exactly Twitch will be integrated into Vermintide 2 remains to be seen. More information will be coming during a livestream this December. “Vermintide 2 is the evolution of the genre. If you liked the first game, you’ll love the second.” says Martin Wahlund, CEO of Fatshark, “We have listened to the community, analyzed hours and hours of online playthroughs, and combined this with our passion for co-op games to bring you the very best experience possible.” Warhammer: Vermintide 2 will be available first quarter 2018 for PC and consoles.
  14. Developer Fatshark held a livestream today in which it pulled the covers off of the sequel to Warhammer: End Times - Vermintide. The company's modest attempt at creating a medieval fantasy version of Left 4 Dead has now given way to a much more expanded universe full of all kinds of creatures and dangers beyond the Skaven rat-men who plagued the first game. The heroes from the previous game have united to take on the remnants of the Skaven army who have allied themselves with the Chaos faction. The five heroes can choose from 15 difference career paths, each with different appearances, abilities, talent trees, and equipment. This team of hardy adventurers are the only thing standing between the oncoming hordes of rat-men, Chaos, and more that seek the destruction of the empire. As you might deduce from the earlier comparison to Left 4 Dead, Vermintide 2 continues the series penchant for four player co-op. Players will need to work together either with their friends or NPCs to survive each of the 13 deadly levels that take place around the fortress city of Helmgart on the border of the Empire. Vermintide 2 will come with integrated Twitch functionality. More information about just how exactly Twitch will be integrated into Vermintide 2 remains to be seen. More information will be coming during a livestream this December. “Vermintide 2 is the evolution of the genre. If you liked the first game, you’ll love the second.” says Martin Wahlund, CEO of Fatshark, “We have listened to the community, analyzed hours and hours of online playthroughs, and combined this with our passion for co-op games to bring you the very best experience possible.” Warhammer: Vermintide 2 will be available first quarter 2018 for PC and consoles. View full article
  15. Red Faction released in 2001 for the PlayStation 2, PC, and N-Gage. In this Honorable Mention, Daniel mostly discusses the widely acclaimed PS2 version of the title, which strove to make a name for itself in the shooting genre by implementing environmental manipulation. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Phantasy Star II 'The Demon Star' by Sir_NutS and Stephen Kelly (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03625) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  16. Red Faction released in 2001 for the PlayStation 2, PC, and N-Gage. In this Honorable Mention, Daniel mostly discusses the widely acclaimed PS2 version of the title, which strove to make a name for itself in the shooting genre by implementing environmental manipulation. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Phantasy Star II 'The Demon Star' by Sir_NutS and Stephen Kelly (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03625) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  17. After a couple of delays, it seems like it's finally safe to be excited for the release of South Park: The Fractured But Whole. And last night's latest entry into the core TV series season 21, episode 4 "Franchise Prequel " all but solidified the fact that yes, the new South Park game is indeed coming out in less than a week. The new episode aired October 11 and starts out with a superhero audition and evolves into commentary about Facebook. Innocent enough right? We've had episodes with the gang running around in superhero garb before, but there was more than just a subtle nod to the upcoming game at the end of the episode. In the final scene, there was a dialogue that will seem familiar to anyone who saw the E3 2016 trailer since its almost the exactly same (save a few edits). We see the group splitting up into two "franchises" creating the conflict for the game. With all of this in mind, Matt and Trey are probably giving us a hint to who at least one of the in-game villains will be, Mark Zuckerberg. Some background, in the episode some alarming pictures show up on Facebook of the Coon and Friends, thanks to Professor Chaos' ingenious and devious plan to slander them via the web. The parents of the SP universe, as competent as ever invite Mark Zuckerberg to the tiny mountain town to resolve things. Zuckerberg proves to be more trouble than he's worth (and has a weird dubbed voice?) and refuses to be "blocked" out of town. And if you needed any more evidence that the episode and game are indeed tied together, South Park tweeted this out in anticipation of the airing. The game officially releases on Tuesday, October 17. It follows its 2014 predecessor South Park: The Stick of Truth. Both games feature RPG gameplay closely resembling the style of the show. Will you be playing The Fractured But Whole? How do you think gameplay will differ from The Stick of Truth? View full article
  18. After a couple of delays, it seems like it's finally safe to be excited for the release of South Park: The Fractured But Whole. And last night's latest entry into the core TV series season 21, episode 4 "Franchise Prequel " all but solidified the fact that yes, the new South Park game is indeed coming out in less than a week. The new episode aired October 11 and starts out with a superhero audition and evolves into commentary about Facebook. Innocent enough right? We've had episodes with the gang running around in superhero garb before, but there was more than just a subtle nod to the upcoming game at the end of the episode. In the final scene, there was a dialogue that will seem familiar to anyone who saw the E3 2016 trailer since its almost the exactly same (save a few edits). We see the group splitting up into two "franchises" creating the conflict for the game. With all of this in mind, Matt and Trey are probably giving us a hint to who at least one of the in-game villains will be, Mark Zuckerberg. Some background, in the episode some alarming pictures show up on Facebook of the Coon and Friends, thanks to Professor Chaos' ingenious and devious plan to slander them via the web. The parents of the SP universe, as competent as ever invite Mark Zuckerberg to the tiny mountain town to resolve things. Zuckerberg proves to be more trouble than he's worth (and has a weird dubbed voice?) and refuses to be "blocked" out of town. And if you needed any more evidence that the episode and game are indeed tied together, South Park tweeted this out in anticipation of the airing. The game officially releases on Tuesday, October 17. It follows its 2014 predecessor South Park: The Stick of Truth. Both games feature RPG gameplay closely resembling the style of the show. Will you be playing The Fractured But Whole? How do you think gameplay will differ from The Stick of Truth?
  19. Extinction made a definite impression when it appeared at this year's E3. Players take on the role of Avil, the last Sentinel of his world, as he fights to prevent humanity's annihilation at the hands of an army of towering ogres. The Attack on Titan-like size disparity between the ogres and Avil leads to really interesting logistical problems - how do you best climb an angry skyscraper bent on killing you? The new gameplay trailer from Iron Galaxy showcases the different ogres, a lore tease, and some of Avil's handy acrobatic moves. Extinction is separated into multiple levels where Avil must defend his city against waves of ogre invaders. These ogres are able to completely destroy the environment - if Avil sits back to do nothing, the city could be completely leveled. In order to fight them, Avil will need to dash through city streets, climb towers, and use whatever the environment can provide to take down the ogres. Ogres come in all kinds of different variations. Some are heavily armored, others have light armor, but massive weapons. The gameplay trailer alludes to numerous other types of ogres that haven't yet been revealed, but we see hulking red brutes and ogres with barbed wire and bones around their piece of armor, hinting that what we have seen so far is only the tip of the ogre-sized iceberg. Extinction will be available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC early 2018.
  20. Extinction made a definite impression when it appeared at this year's E3. Players take on the role of Avil, the last Sentinel of his world, as he fights to prevent humanity's annihilation at the hands of an army of towering ogres. The Attack on Titan-like size disparity between the ogres and Avil leads to really interesting logistical problems - how do you best climb an angry skyscraper bent on killing you? The new gameplay trailer from Iron Galaxy showcases the different ogres, a lore tease, and some of Avil's handy acrobatic moves. Extinction is separated into multiple levels where Avil must defend his city against waves of ogre invaders. These ogres are able to completely destroy the environment - if Avil sits back to do nothing, the city could be completely leveled. In order to fight them, Avil will need to dash through city streets, climb towers, and use whatever the environment can provide to take down the ogres. Ogres come in all kinds of different variations. Some are heavily armored, others have light armor, but massive weapons. The gameplay trailer alludes to numerous other types of ogres that haven't yet been revealed, but we see hulking red brutes and ogres with barbed wire and bones around their piece of armor, hinting that what we have seen so far is only the tip of the ogre-sized iceberg. Extinction will be available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC early 2018. View full article
  21. Gaming News:Review: Slime-San

    Indie retro platformers are a dime a dozen in 2017. Since the success of Super Meat Boy in 2010, the independent scene has become cluttered with also-ran, ultra-challenging, quirky platformers of the 8-bit variety. As an ultra-challenging, quirky platformer of the 8-bit variety, Slime-San, from developer Fabraz and publisher Headup Games, will likely fall squarely into that also-ran category, to no fault of its own. Slime-San’s titular protagonist finds himself trapped inside a worm. The reasons are unknown, but probably have something to do with the fact that it’s… ya know, a slime. Inside the worm, an entire community of slimes has developed, with NPC’s offering up quirky flavor text and gameplay modifications. Everyone seems to have resigned themselves to their fate, eternally trapped inside this volatile invertebrate, but not Slime-San. He’s going to get out, and he’s going to free everyone else in the process. Slime-San’s amusing story, but silly story made me laugh more than a handful of times. Slime-San is a fine example of what has made the platformer genre so enduring even three decades after Mario first bounced off a goomba’s head. The platforming presents an intense dance of thumbs and reflexes as each level tests your ability to flip back and forth between the numerous pitfalls and traps in each stage. Those obstacles range from enemies that chase you around the level, to lasers that rise and fall in tandem, to an ever-present red slime that acts as a timer lending some more tension to each stage. The environments inside the giant worm in which Slime-San is trapped, mainly consist of green and red surfaces. You can bounce and climb up green surfaces, while red surfaces will kill your gungy, little protagonist. You can slow time to pass through green surfaces or perform a quick forward dash to more easily maneuver through the game’s many obstacles. These abilities are key to Slime-San’s mobility, which feels tight and joyful, always keeping you on your toes without becoming too frustrating. This is greatly aided by the game’s generous checkpoint system. Death in Slime-San serves as a lesson in how to avoid it on the next run through a level, rather than a frustrating penalty. That’s not to say Slime-San avoids frustration altogether. As the game progresses, new concepts and obstacles are introduced at a steady drip. While some effectively enhance the challenge, others detract from what Slime-San does well. There are a number of puzzle levels that, when combined with the game’s already perplexing platforming sequences, serve to slow things down and create a repetitive loop that often tested my patience to its breaking point. In addition, underwater levels show up more often that they should, which is to say they should’ve been nixed completely. The underwater stages simply don’t play to Slime-San’s strengths, slowing Slime-San’s movement speed to a crawl and evoking the feeling of swimming through a bowl of Jell-O rather than zipping around tightly designed corridors. At times like this, Slime-San’s creativity undermines its tight, smooth game design. Slime-San’s best moments are challenges that require unimpeachable control, precise timing, and speed. Slime-San is designed for forward momentum, and each one-screen stage lays out where you need to go right from the beginning, so all you need to do is figure out how to get there and the quickest route to take. Boss fights break up the challenges nicely, allowing you to experiment with different techniques to take down each beast. These fights test your skills to the max, but they’re also a lot of fun. I only wish there were more of them. My biggest issue with Slime-San relates directly to the platform I played it on. The Nintendo Switch Joy-Con controllers were not designed well for someone with large hands, and playing Slime-San exasperates that problem. The game demands precise timing and thumb-work, but the Joy-Cons can’t accommodate that for someone like myself. Whereas I find that minimalist, chill games like Death Squared seem perfectly suited to the Switch, games like Slime-San and, similarly, Super Meat Boy (which also recently released on Switch) are hindered by the console’s standard input controllers. I have never wished I had a Nintendo Switch Pro Controller more than after some of the more harrowing sections of Slime-San. The lack of a real d-pad and the close proximity of the face buttons and the shoulder buttons on the Joy-Cons force my hands into a claw position that aches for about ten minutes afterwards. Listen, I know that not everyone will have this problem. Maybe I’m just old, or maybe I just have big hands, or god forbid, maybe I’m developing carpal tunnel or early stage arthritis, but playing Slime-San on Switch made me feel like my hands were falling apart. It’s a shame, because this is the kind of game that can ensnare you for hours on end as you try “just one more level” over and over until your thumbs go numb. Conclusion: Slime-San isn’t perfect, but it is charming, and provides a challenging good time for any fan of the genre. I’m glad it released on Switch, so that it’s now on all of the major platforms; PS4, Xbox One, Switch, and Steam. It’s the kind of game that fits nicely on Switch (provided you have a pro controller, or the joy-cons fit your hands perfectly), and especially benefits from the new Nintendo system’s less-congested marketplace. It’s a great game, but it doesn’t stand out from the pack of indie platformers on offer. Heck, it’s not even the most recognizable slime-themed game this year. While never quite reaching the heights of some of its predecessors, Slime-San makes for an enjoyable, but imperfect little platforming adventure. View full article
  22. Review: Slime-San

    Indie retro platformers are a dime a dozen in 2017. Since the success of Super Meat Boy in 2010, the independent scene has become cluttered with also-ran, ultra-challenging, quirky platformers of the 8-bit variety. As an ultra-challenging, quirky platformer of the 8-bit variety, Slime-San, from developer Fabraz and publisher Headup Games, will likely fall squarely into that also-ran category, to no fault of its own. Slime-San’s titular protagonist finds himself trapped inside a worm. The reasons are unknown, but probably have something to do with the fact that it’s… ya know, a slime. Inside the worm, an entire community of slimes has developed, with NPC’s offering up quirky flavor text and gameplay modifications. Everyone seems to have resigned themselves to their fate, eternally trapped inside this volatile invertebrate, but not Slime-San. He’s going to get out, and he’s going to free everyone else in the process. Slime-San’s amusing story, but silly story made me laugh more than a handful of times. Slime-San is a fine example of what has made the platformer genre so enduring even three decades after Mario first bounced off a goomba’s head. The platforming presents an intense dance of thumbs and reflexes as each level tests your ability to flip back and forth between the numerous pitfalls and traps in each stage. Those obstacles range from enemies that chase you around the level, to lasers that rise and fall in tandem, to an ever-present red slime that acts as a timer lending some more tension to each stage. The environments inside the giant worm in which Slime-San is trapped, mainly consist of green and red surfaces. You can bounce and climb up green surfaces, while red surfaces will kill your gungy, little protagonist. You can slow time to pass through green surfaces or perform a quick forward dash to more easily maneuver through the game’s many obstacles. These abilities are key to Slime-San’s mobility, which feels tight and joyful, always keeping you on your toes without becoming too frustrating. This is greatly aided by the game’s generous checkpoint system. Death in Slime-San serves as a lesson in how to avoid it on the next run through a level, rather than a frustrating penalty. That’s not to say Slime-San avoids frustration altogether. As the game progresses, new concepts and obstacles are introduced at a steady drip. While some effectively enhance the challenge, others detract from what Slime-San does well. There are a number of puzzle levels that, when combined with the game’s already perplexing platforming sequences, serve to slow things down and create a repetitive loop that often tested my patience to its breaking point. In addition, underwater levels show up more often that they should, which is to say they should’ve been nixed completely. The underwater stages simply don’t play to Slime-San’s strengths, slowing Slime-San’s movement speed to a crawl and evoking the feeling of swimming through a bowl of Jell-O rather than zipping around tightly designed corridors. At times like this, Slime-San’s creativity undermines its tight, smooth game design. Slime-San’s best moments are challenges that require unimpeachable control, precise timing, and speed. Slime-San is designed for forward momentum, and each one-screen stage lays out where you need to go right from the beginning, so all you need to do is figure out how to get there and the quickest route to take. Boss fights break up the challenges nicely, allowing you to experiment with different techniques to take down each beast. These fights test your skills to the max, but they’re also a lot of fun. I only wish there were more of them. My biggest issue with Slime-San relates directly to the platform I played it on. The Nintendo Switch Joy-Con controllers were not designed well for someone with large hands, and playing Slime-San exasperates that problem. The game demands precise timing and thumb-work, but the Joy-Cons can’t accommodate that for someone like myself. Whereas I find that minimalist, chill games like Death Squared seem perfectly suited to the Switch, games like Slime-San and, similarly, Super Meat Boy (which also recently released on Switch) are hindered by the console’s standard input controllers. I have never wished I had a Nintendo Switch Pro Controller more than after some of the more harrowing sections of Slime-San. The lack of a real d-pad and the close proximity of the face buttons and the shoulder buttons on the Joy-Cons force my hands into a claw position that aches for about ten minutes afterwards. Listen, I know that not everyone will have this problem. Maybe I’m just old, or maybe I just have big hands, or god forbid, maybe I’m developing carpal tunnel or early stage arthritis, but playing Slime-San on Switch made me feel like my hands were falling apart. It’s a shame, because this is the kind of game that can ensnare you for hours on end as you try “just one more level” over and over until your thumbs go numb. Conclusion: Slime-San isn’t perfect, but it is charming, and provides a challenging good time for any fan of the genre. I’m glad it released on Switch, so that it’s now on all of the major platforms; PS4, Xbox One, Switch, and Steam. It’s the kind of game that fits nicely on Switch (provided you have a pro controller, or the joy-cons fit your hands perfectly), and especially benefits from the new Nintendo system’s less-congested marketplace. It’s a great game, but it doesn’t stand out from the pack of indie platformers on offer. Heck, it’s not even the most recognizable slime-themed game this year. While never quite reaching the heights of some of its predecessors, Slime-San makes for an enjoyable, but imperfect little platforming adventure.
  23. Telltale Games has revealed the release date and trailer for the upcoming part two of Batman: The Enemy Within. Titled 'The Pact,' the second episode of the five episode series focuses on the aftermath of a mysterious assassin's latest handiwork. Explosions across Gotham shake the city to its very core. Batman attempts to track down the culprits behind these misdeeds, but finds himself up against a foe that might even stump the Dark Knight himself. Meanwhile, John Doe traps Bruce Wayne in a complicated scheme - and the only way out is to follow it through. Beginning with episode two, Telltale will be launching all episodes on all platforms simultaneously. We reached out to Telltale for clarification on whether that simultaneous release schedule will extend to other Telltale game series or if it is limited to The Enemy Within. We will update with an answer. Episode Two 'The Pact' launches October 3 on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Mac. In addition, the first two episodes of the series will become available on iOS and Android-based devices that same day. The boxed version, which Telltale has taken to calling the 'Season Pass Disc,' will also release in stores on October 3. The disc unlocks all previous episodes as well as all future episodes as they release.
  24. Telltale Games has revealed the release date and trailer for the upcoming part two of Batman: The Enemy Within. Titled 'The Pact,' the second episode of the five episode series focuses on the aftermath of a mysterious assassin's latest handiwork. Explosions across Gotham shake the city to its very core. Batman attempts to track down the culprits behind these misdeeds, but finds himself up against a foe that might even stump the Dark Knight himself. Meanwhile, John Doe traps Bruce Wayne in a complicated scheme - and the only way out is to follow it through. Beginning with episode two, Telltale will be launching all episodes on all platforms simultaneously. We reached out to Telltale for clarification on whether that simultaneous release schedule will extend to other Telltale game series or if it is limited to The Enemy Within. We will update with an answer. Episode Two 'The Pact' launches October 3 on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, PC, and Mac. In addition, the first two episodes of the series will become available on iOS and Android-based devices that same day. The boxed version, which Telltale has taken to calling the 'Season Pass Disc,' will also release in stores on October 3. The disc unlocks all previous episodes as well as all future episodes as they release. View full article
  25. The premise seems so simple - build your own theme park with dinosaurs and make it as safe as possible - how has it never been done before? Well, it has been done before. Jurassic Park III: Park Builder, Jurassic Park: Operation Genesis, and Jurassic Park Builder all tackled the same situation. However, those games all seemed to fall somewhat short of the dream players had of running a dino park while making sure life doesn't find a way. What makes Jurassic World Evolution different? Well, without more information, there aren't any specifics that back up the impression that this time we might finally get a game that fully capitalizes on the premise of a dinosaur theme park. However, the ray of hope comes in the form of the developer: Frontier Developments. Frontier has been on a bit of a roll in recent years. They created Elite: Dangerous, the sprawling space-faring sim, and Planet Coaster, a theme park construction simulator. Both titles were very well received, which bodes well for Jurassic World Evolution. Not only that, but Frontier worked on park management sims (RollerCoaster Tycoon and Thrillville franchises) for much of the early to mid 2000s. Their team possesses a wellspring of experience when it comes to creating the ideal Jurassic Park sim. What we do know is that players will be running a more modern version of Jurassic Park, Jurassic World, as seen in the recent soft reboot of the film franchise. Players will be in charge of creating new dinosaurs to show off to the public, creating additional attractions, sealing up the containment areas with the best tech available, researching new improvements to the park, and creating contingency plans in case life finds a way. Jurassic World Evolution releases sometime during summer 2018 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.