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Found 10 results

  1. Earlier this month, Waypoint ran a month long game jam called New Jam City that attracted a number of interesting entries. One of these entries lovingly resurrected the Noid, an advertising mascot for Domino's Pizza in the mid-80s. Strangely, the Noid managed to become somewhat popular, resulting in several video game adaptations of the character over the years. One of these was Capcom's Yo! Noid! for the NES in 1990. It wasn't a particularly great game, which is why the creation of a direct sequel, even as a game jam entry, is turning some heads. Yo! Noid II: Enter the Void ia a reimagining of the Noid as an early PlayStation One/N64 platformer that plays like a strange cross between Mario 64 and Tomb Raider. The game begins with the titular Noid losing his trusty yo-yo and platforming through New York City to get it back. However, that certainly isn't the end of the adventure. After obtaining the yo-yo, the Noid falls into the Noid Void, an interdimensional wasteland populated by strange mushroom creatures and peppered with various pizza-themed levels and collectibles. This is where Yo! Noid II opens up and allows for exploration and a great deal of puzzle solving. I'm going to level with you, this game is actually fun. Not in an ironic, "haha, isn't it dumb that they made a game starring the Noid?" way (though don't get me wrong, it is absolutely dumb that someone made another game that was in any way affiliated with the Noid, a fact that the developers certainly understood and embraced to great effect)- I genuinely enjoyed playing Yo! Noid II. Wall jumping and running work rather well when paired with a ledge grab mechanic that comes in very handy. The Noid can even use his yo-yo to swing between platforms, pull levers, and open pizza portals to other worlds. Oh, the Noid also dabs now, because of course he does. All of this is done in an endearingly janky style that's meant to be a call back to those early 3D platformers that both enthralled and frustrated a generation. It's unclear if the somewhat wonky and temperamental camera was designed to bring out that style or if it's simply a frustrating camera. However, for a short nostalgia experiment with a sense of humor like Yo! Noid II, I'm willing to give the benefit of the doubt. Yo! Noid II: Enter the Void is a far, far better game than the Noid has ever deserved, but it's free at the moment and certainly worth your time. You can download it directly from the developers to see what the Noid is up to in this age of HD gaming. There's also an official soundtrack because why not? The Noid is a thing again, so why not?
  2. Earlier this month, Waypoint ran a month long game jam called New Jam City that attracted a number of interesting entries. One of these entries lovingly resurrected the Noid, an advertising mascot for Domino's Pizza in the mid-80s. Strangely, the Noid managed to become somewhat popular, resulting in several video game adaptations of the character over the years. One of these was Capcom's Yo! Noid! for the NES in 1990. It wasn't a particularly great game, which is why the creation of a direct sequel, even as a game jam entry, is turning some heads. Yo! Noid II: Enter the Void ia a reimagining of the Noid as an early PlayStation One/N64 platformer that plays like a strange cross between Mario 64 and Tomb Raider. The game begins with the titular Noid losing his trusty yo-yo and platforming through New York City to get it back. However, that certainly isn't the end of the adventure. After obtaining the yo-yo, the Noid falls into the Noid Void, an interdimensional wasteland populated by strange mushroom creatures and peppered with various pizza-themed levels and collectibles. This is where Yo! Noid II opens up and allows for exploration and a great deal of puzzle solving. I'm going to level with you, this game is actually fun. Not in an ironic, "haha, isn't it dumb that they made a game starring the Noid?" way (though don't get me wrong, it is absolutely dumb that someone made another game that was in any way affiliated with the Noid, a fact that the developers certainly understood and embraced to great effect)- I genuinely enjoyed playing Yo! Noid II. Wall jumping and running work rather well when paired with a ledge grab mechanic that comes in very handy. The Noid can even use his yo-yo to swing between platforms, pull levers, and open pizza portals to other worlds. Oh, the Noid also dabs now, because of course he does. All of this is done in an endearingly janky style that's meant to be a call back to those early 3D platformers that both enthralled and frustrated a generation. It's unclear if the somewhat wonky and temperamental camera was designed to bring out that style or if it's simply a frustrating camera. However, for a short nostalgia experiment with a sense of humor like Yo! Noid II, I'm willing to give the benefit of the doubt. Yo! Noid II: Enter the Void is a far, far better game than the Noid has ever deserved, but it's free at the moment and certainly worth your time. You can download it directly from the developers to see what the Noid is up to in this age of HD gaming. There's also an official soundtrack because why not? The Noid is a thing again, so why not? View full article
  3. The first Mega Man Legacy Collection released back in 2015 and covered the first six titles of the Mega Man series. Those first six games represent the entire NES era of Mega Man. Capcom has announced that a second Legacy Collection will release containing the further adventures of side-scrolling Mega Man that released following Mega Man 6. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 will contain Mega Man 7-10, covering the period of time when the series broke out of 8-bit graphics and into 16/32-bit action before returning to its 8-bit roots. Since 9 and 10 are modern installments, both will contain all DLC released for them to date. There will be minor tweaks and improvements throughout the four games of the collection. One of the major additions that could help new players appreciate Mega Man without the frustration is the new "Extra Armor" option that halves all damage taken and a checkpoint system to help pick up the action from a convenient distance instead of starting the level over from scratch. If that seems too easy, stages have been remixed for difficulty in the new Challenge Mode where players can compete and compare completion time with others around the world. For those who value gaming history, Capcom has also included an in-game museum that includes production art, sketches, development material, concepts, and a music player to listen to all the catchy bloops and bleeps of the Mega Man soundtracks. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 releases on August 8th for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Oddly, the title doesn't appear to be coming to the Nintendo Switch at this time.
  4. The first Mega Man Legacy Collection released back in 2015 and covered the first six titles of the Mega Man series. Those first six games represent the entire NES era of Mega Man. Capcom has announced that a second Legacy Collection will release containing the further adventures of side-scrolling Mega Man that released following Mega Man 6. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 will contain Mega Man 7-10, covering the period of time when the series broke out of 8-bit graphics and into 16/32-bit action before returning to its 8-bit roots. Since 9 and 10 are modern installments, both will contain all DLC released for them to date. There will be minor tweaks and improvements throughout the four games of the collection. One of the major additions that could help new players appreciate Mega Man without the frustration is the new "Extra Armor" option that halves all damage taken and a checkpoint system to help pick up the action from a convenient distance instead of starting the level over from scratch. If that seems too easy, stages have been remixed for difficulty in the new Challenge Mode where players can compete and compare completion time with others around the world. For those who value gaming history, Capcom has also included an in-game museum that includes production art, sketches, development material, concepts, and a music player to listen to all the catchy bloops and bleeps of the Mega Man soundtracks. Mega Man Legacy Collection 2 releases on August 8th for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Oddly, the title doesn't appear to be coming to the Nintendo Switch at this time. View full article
  5. I recently found a Randomizer for Legend of Zelda NES ROMs. Streamer ProJared did a series which made me think a fresh randomized run at Legend of Zelda would fit nicely in my Extra Life Game Day. It'll only be my second year participating, and my first event was nothing special. Any advice on how best to run this would be most helpful. Oh, and I can change the Link sprite to Trogdor... so Trogdor will most definitely be burninating Hyrule on Game Day.
  6. With the recent release of the Nintendo Switch and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, another game looms large in the background: The original Legend of Zelda, the 1986 title that started it all and taught us all that it's dangerous to go alone. Nintendo's open world adventure forced players to think beyond the limitations of previous console games, forced Nintendo to change how it made games, almost single-handedly created the Nintendo Power magazine, and became both a cultural and game design touchstone. Does The Legend of Zelda, with all of its 1986 technical limitations, still hold up over 30 years later? Outro music: The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past 'The Imprisoning War' by smartpoetic (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03308) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! A Patreon has been created for those looking to support the show. You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  7. With the recent release of the Nintendo Switch and The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, another game looms large in the background: The original Legend of Zelda, the 1986 title that started it all and taught us all that it's dangerous to go alone. Nintendo's open world adventure forced players to think beyond the limitations of previous console games, forced Nintendo to change how it made games, almost single-handedly created the Nintendo Power magazine, and became both a cultural and game design touchstone. Does The Legend of Zelda, with all of its 1986 technical limitations, still hold up over 30 years later? Outro music: The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past 'The Imprisoning War' by smartpoetic (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03308) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! A Patreon has been created for those looking to support the show. You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  8. I can honestly say that I’ve grown up alongside the video game industry. My best friend down the street had an Atari 2600, so we began there with Centipede, Frogger, and the gang, before my family got a Nintendo (the original Nintendo Entertainment System). Spending countless hours with the likes of Mario, Link, Donkey Kong, Q*bert, and friends was the best thing I could do with my day. Then Contra appeared. The limitation of three lives made for a series of insane levels. This was our first exploration into the concept of “I don’t care how ridiculous this is, I will get past this!” Today, I could challenge any gamer from my generation what the code was and be met with that look of, "Really? You have to ask?" Say it with me: Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left, Right, B, A, Start. As the years passed, the procession of systems continued: Sega Genesis, Game Boy, PlayStation, Dreamcast, and Xbox, to name a few. I am proud to say I experienced many of these, playing a variety of games, from the good to the horrible and many in between. The extensive achievement lists of today’s games are a far cry from the simplicity that Pong or Dig-Dug offered. Sometimes a good card game or tabletop RPG can be as exciting as the latest release. While some will scoff at the notion of playing Dungeons & Dragons, I have enjoyed adventuring into the random imagination of several dungeon masters over the years. My first exploration was in high school with a group of buddies, where literally anything could happen. If our dungeon master thought we were getting even slightly too bold, he had no issues with bringing out an epic level creature to wipe our characters completely. Few things are more humbling than having to start from scratch, with additional limitations because of your own behavior. My second party was in college, and had an interesting array of characters, both in game and out. It is awesome to see the varying degrees of how different people will play their characters. The meekest person you know may command a ferocious barbarian in game; or the local quarterback may skulk around as a pocket-picking rogue. Almost a year ago now, I was thinking to myself, “I have played enough games of varying styles, I should find an outlet to share my opinion of games with others. I should be a game reviewer. Surely I have a valid opinion.” Let's be honest; who hasn't had that thought once or twice (a day) when they're in the middle of one campaign or another? Well, I found my outlet in a growing website by the name of BrutalGamer. They were kind enough to let me join, and now I can say that I write news and reviews for video games and comic books. Yay. We have seen everything; from a brotherly duo working in their basement for years to produce an exciting story all the way up to the AAA studio’s annual record-breakers. You never know what style of game will come across your desk next. Shortly after I joined BrutalGamer, one of my new teammates was asking who signed up for the Extra Life marathon in November. I had no clue this marathon was even a thing. So I did what we do best these days; I googled Extra Life. Lo and behold, I found that there are charitable organizations in the gaming community. Child’s Play, AbleGamers Charity, and Extra Life are only a few. Groups of gamers that will continue doing what they love to do while also lending their collective power to help those less fortunate. Extra Life in particular, has a push to host a 24-hour gaming marathon, and the money each participant raises goes to a Children's Miracle Network Hospital of their choosing. I figured something had to be amiss here. There is always a loophole, or some catch. I tell you, there is no loophole, nor any catch. Last year I raised $115 of my $150 goal, and helped support my niece and nephew's hospital in Louisville, Kentucky. I have met other Extra Lifers and gained some additional thoughts on raising money. Did you know you could have your own marathons, any time of year? Beyond that, some belong to Guilds and have regularly scheduled events! These angels raise money year-round! I had a friend dye his black hair a vibrant shade of orange for reaching his Extra Life fundraising goal. Now, to be honest, this can easily sound overwhelming: Guilds, marathons, and fundraisers. If you break it down, it sounds that much more exciting. Guild is a lofty name for a bunch of like-minded gamers in your area that want to get together and play games. How bad can that be? Marathons, well who would dislike the thought of playing their favorite game(s) for hours on end? As for the fundraisers, take a few moments to get on your favorite social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.) to let your friends and family that you want to raise money for children. That’s right, raising money for children in hospitals. In addition, you want to do it by playing games with friends. That doesn’t sound so bad now, does it? You can choose any game or games you want, and you can decide what date works best for you. What’s not to like about that? Last year was my wife and my first time participating in the 24-hour Extra Life marathon, and we are planning to do so again this coming November. In fact, my wife just asked me last week when the sign-ups began, so we would not miss out. We have learned that several of our friends are board game and card game fans, so we may have to see if we can recruit them to our team this year. If you are like me and you think this seems like a great way to raise money for a good cause while also having a good time, then you should check out Extra Life. They can be found in-person at almost any comic or gaming convention around the country. More than that though, you probably know more people that either participate or fund the group than you realize. When I go to Chicago’s Comic Convention next month, I look forward to stopping by the Extra Life booth and meeting new friends. So what are you waiting for? Check out Extra Life today! I'm Patrick Mackey and I play for Kosair Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky. If you don’t have a team, you are welcome to join or donate to ours! --- Any other Extra Lifers out there with some writing skills and a good idea? Read about how to become a community contributor and start submitting today! View full article
  9. How I Found Extra Life

    I can honestly say that I’ve grown up alongside the video game industry. My best friend down the street had an Atari 2600, so we began there with Centipede, Frogger, and the gang, before my family got a Nintendo (the original Nintendo Entertainment System). Spending countless hours with the likes of Mario, Link, Donkey Kong, Q*bert, and friends was the best thing I could do with my day. Then Contra appeared. The limitation of three lives made for a series of insane levels. This was our first exploration into the concept of “I don’t care how ridiculous this is, I will get past this!” Today, I could challenge any gamer from my generation what the code was and be met with that look of, "Really? You have to ask?" Say it with me: Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left, Right, B, A, Start. As the years passed, the procession of systems continued: Sega Genesis, Game Boy, PlayStation, Dreamcast, and Xbox, to name a few. I am proud to say I experienced many of these, playing a variety of games, from the good to the horrible and many in between. The extensive achievement lists of today’s games are a far cry from the simplicity that Pong or Dig-Dug offered. Sometimes a good card game or tabletop RPG can be as exciting as the latest release. While some will scoff at the notion of playing Dungeons & Dragons, I have enjoyed adventuring into the random imagination of several dungeon masters over the years. My first exploration was in high school with a group of buddies, where literally anything could happen. If our dungeon master thought we were getting even slightly too bold, he had no issues with bringing out an epic level creature to wipe our characters completely. Few things are more humbling than having to start from scratch, with additional limitations because of your own behavior. My second party was in college, and had an interesting array of characters, both in game and out. It is awesome to see the varying degrees of how different people will play their characters. The meekest person you know may command a ferocious barbarian in game; or the local quarterback may skulk around as a pocket-picking rogue. Almost a year ago now, I was thinking to myself, “I have played enough games of varying styles, I should find an outlet to share my opinion of games with others. I should be a game reviewer. Surely I have a valid opinion.” Let's be honest; who hasn't had that thought once or twice (a day) when they're in the middle of one campaign or another? Well, I found my outlet in a growing website by the name of BrutalGamer. They were kind enough to let me join, and now I can say that I write news and reviews for video games and comic books. Yay. We have seen everything; from a brotherly duo working in their basement for years to produce an exciting story all the way up to the AAA studio’s annual record-breakers. You never know what style of game will come across your desk next. Shortly after I joined BrutalGamer, one of my new teammates was asking who signed up for the Extra Life marathon in November. I had no clue this marathon was even a thing. So I did what we do best these days; I googled Extra Life. Lo and behold, I found that there are charitable organizations in the gaming community. Child’s Play, AbleGamers Charity, and Extra Life are only a few. Groups of gamers that will continue doing what they love to do while also lending their collective power to help those less fortunate. Extra Life in particular, has a push to host a 24-hour gaming marathon, and the money each participant raises goes to a Children's Miracle Network Hospital of their choosing. I figured something had to be amiss here. There is always a loophole, or some catch. I tell you, there is no loophole, nor any catch. Last year I raised $115 of my $150 goal, and helped support my niece and nephew's hospital in Louisville, Kentucky. I have met other Extra Lifers and gained some additional thoughts on raising money. Did you know you could have your own marathons, any time of year? Beyond that, some belong to Guilds and have regularly scheduled events! These angels raise money year-round! I had a friend dye his black hair a vibrant shade of orange for reaching his Extra Life fundraising goal. Now, to be honest, this can easily sound overwhelming: Guilds, marathons, and fundraisers. If you break it down, it sounds that much more exciting. Guild is a lofty name for a bunch of like-minded gamers in your area that want to get together and play games. How bad can that be? Marathons, well who would dislike the thought of playing their favorite game(s) for hours on end? As for the fundraisers, take a few moments to get on your favorite social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.) to let your friends and family that you want to raise money for children. That’s right, raising money for children in hospitals. In addition, you want to do it by playing games with friends. That doesn’t sound so bad now, does it? You can choose any game or games you want, and you can decide what date works best for you. What’s not to like about that? Last year was my wife and my first time participating in the 24-hour Extra Life marathon, and we are planning to do so again this coming November. In fact, my wife just asked me last week when the sign-ups began, so we would not miss out. We have learned that several of our friends are board game and card game fans, so we may have to see if we can recruit them to our team this year. If you are like me and you think this seems like a great way to raise money for a good cause while also having a good time, then you should check out Extra Life. They can be found in-person at almost any comic or gaming convention around the country. More than that though, you probably know more people that either participate or fund the group than you realize. When I go to Chicago’s Comic Convention next month, I look forward to stopping by the Extra Life booth and meeting new friends. So what are you waiting for? Check out Extra Life today! I'm Patrick Mackey and I play for Kosair Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky. If you don’t have a team, you are welcome to join or donate to ours! --- Any other Extra Lifers out there with some writing skills and a good idea? Read about how to become a community contributor and start submitting today!
  10. Favorite Old School RPG??

    Hey guys! I was wondering what some of your favorite old school rpgs are??? Lets say anything ps1 and older! Mine are: Chrono trigger, lunar silver star story complete, legend of dragoon, shining force and a few others!!!