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Found 51 results

  1. Extra Life Fundraiser At The House Cafe

    until
    We're on a journey to help sick, injured and disabled kids in our local community and we need your help. Our local Children's Miracle Network Hospital treats thousands of children each year, regardless of their illness, injury or even their family's ability to pay. These kids are facing scary stuff like cancer, cystic fibrosis, and injuries they may get from just being a kid or even born with.To help raise funds and awareness for these kids, I am (Sean Wilcox) participating in this huge worldwide movement called Extra Life. Gamers of all kinds pledge to play everything from video games to board games and tabletop RPG's! It is my goal to bring something new to the table for Extra Life. I hope bring the perfect mix of music and gaming. Thats where this event fits perfect. Bringing together a group of artists that would love to support the cause. July 21st, We raising awareness and money to help support Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital at The House Cafe. Lineup Includes: Introduction by A.C of True Flight Christina Antonio Freek Gamer Joel La Vaughn Prologue to Posterity Dynasty Ent Happy The Rapper NeverclearX Security Culture True Flight L.S & D-Trigga (8fifteen's Finest) Special Performances by Wolf Raffles: Out On A Whim- 10 $20 Gift Certificates for Basic Piercings Green Tangerine Records- Almost 4 Lb Bucket of Now & Laters Thirty-One W/ Kathy Nitz- A Thirty-One Lunch Bag & Shoulder Bag Manda's Makeover- 3 Moodstruck Mineral Pigment Powders, 3 Moodstruck Mineral Lucrative Lip Gloss & 2 sample packs of the Royalty Detoxifying Mask Kasket Krew- 2 hours of FREE studio time; mixing included at Infected Studios Sponsers: Out On A Whim Green Tangerine Record Kasket Krew Manda's Makeover Fargo Skateboarding Thirty-One W/ Kathy Nitz **even though the event is All ages, Must warn that music content may and can be explict but it is all for a great cause and in a good name**
  2. Wintergatan made waves last year with a music video staring a handmade contraption that could be used to make music using a dizzying system of levers, instrument parts, and 2,000 marbles. The Swedish band consists of four members: Martin Molin, Evelina Hägglund, Marcus Sjöberg, and David Zandén. The quartet works together on music and constructs art pieces/musical instruments. So far they only have one album to their name (self-titled from 2013) and their major claim to fame are those instruments. They released a second video showcasing an incredible DIY music box alongside a homemade device they have christened the modulin. Their latest video tackles Mega Man 2 with said modulin - a combination of violin and theramin in spectacular fashion. Check it out for yourself!
  3. Wintergatan made waves last year with a music video staring a handmade contraption that could be used to make music using a dizzying system of levers, instrument parts, and 2,000 marbles. The Swedish band consists of four members: Martin Molin, Evelina Hägglund, Marcus Sjöberg, and David Zandén. The quartet works together on music and constructs art pieces/musical instruments. So far they only have one album to their name (self-titled from 2013) and their major claim to fame are those instruments. They released a second video showcasing an incredible DIY music box alongside a homemade device they have christened the modulin. Their latest video tackles Mega Man 2 with said modulin - a combination of violin and theramin in spectacular fashion. Check it out for yourself! View full article
  4. The talented video game remixing community that thrives on OverClocked Remix has put together their latest (completely free) album in tribute to the handheld gaming system that brought mobile gaming mainstream and its creator, Gunpei Yokoi. The fifteen tracks of Legacy: Game Boy 25th Anniversary are a lovingly crafted tribute to the massively successful Game Boy. Like the memories of the now obsolete system, the sixteen artists who worked on the album manage to convey a beautiful sense of nostalgia. This is worth checking out for anyone who remembers fond moments with the Game Boy or anyone who loves good music, for that matter. I make no secret of how much I love OverClocked Remix. The video game remix community is an interesting one that brims with talented musicians who provide their own unique takes on the classic video game music we all love and also some of the music that isn't so widely known (like this remix of the Versus Play music from Super Dodge Ball or this remix based on OutRun). Almost all of the music on OCRemix available free of charge to download and enjoy, so enjoy one of the largest tributes to video game music on the internet and pay a visit to their site sometime. You can download the Legacy album here.
  5. The song that appeared in the credits of A House Divided, the second episode of The Walking Dead: Season 2 developed by Telltale Games, is now available to download for free. "In The Pines" was arranged by series composer Jared Emerson-Johnson and performed by Janel Drewis, who also works for Telltale as an animator. The song is an adaptation of an Appalachian folk song dating back to the 1870s. The full soundtrack to Season 2 will release after all five episodes have been released. However, for those who can't get enough of the heartful music found in The Walking Dead games, there are several other tracks available for purchase from the Andadel Bandcamp page. You can download "In The Pines" here.
  6. There are fans, and then there are FANS. Scattered throughout the rich world of BioShock Infinite, there are audio recordings contained within devices called voxophones. After playing through Irrational's fantastic follow up to the original BioShock three times, one intrepid and creative fan decided to make a voxophone of his own. You can see two videos showing off his creation below in different stages of completion. Each one includes music and songs found in the game. The device isn't entirely working on the same principle as its in-game counterpart. The spinning disk makes use of a computer fan motor, creating too many rpms to accurately be read by a gramophone needle. This means that the home-made voxophone makes use of an internal MP3 player to store music. Still, the effect remains undeniably cool. Perhaps we will see more refinements on the design going forward.
  7. If you are in the mood for a blast from the past, YouTuber Luminist might just have what you need. Over the past month they have been creating tracks from Nintendo's NES classic Metroid on classic 80s synthesizers. The results are absolutely fantastic. While the original NES tracks certainly have a haunting, ethereal quality, the Korg MS20 Mini synthesizer really adds a lot of body to the composition. More than anything this makes me want to see Metroid make it to the big-screen as a 80s-style sci-fi adventure. You can practically see how it would look with music like this making up the majority of the soundtrack. Keep up the good work, Luminist!
  8. If you are in the mood for a blast from the past, YouTuber Luminist might just have what you need. Over the past month they have been creating tracks from Nintendo's NES classic Metroid on classic 80s synthesizers. The results are absolutely fantastic. While the original NES tracks certainly have a haunting, ethereal quality, the Korg MS20 Mini synthesizer really adds a lot of body to the composition. More than anything this makes me want to see Metroid make it to the big-screen as a 80s-style sci-fi adventure. You can practically see how it would look with music like this making up the majority of the soundtrack. Keep up the good work, Luminist! View full article
  9. Feature: Review: Klang

    If there’s one lesson that 10 years of singing, instrument-playing, and dancing have taught me, it’s that the show must go on. The number of people I’ve seen take “break a leg” beyond pure metaphor, and still soldier on, genuinely astounds me. No matter the error, no matter the number of botched notes, or missed steps, you power through a performance with all you can, for surely the alternative is always worse. For a game so wrapped up in the power of music, it’s odd to see Klang (developed by the one-man team at Tinimations and composed by EDM guru Jordan Aguirre AKA “bLiNd”) take so much of its ethos to heart, and yet stumble on that one key point. As the cybergoth-inspired rave warrior, you’ll fight and headbang your way towards defeating the evil Soundlord Sonos in a world absolutely soaked with neon and musical minutia. Levels, many of which feel like they’re ripped from the stages of your favorite rock venue, pulse with each distinctive track’s beat. Streetlamps shaped like clef notes hang above your head as you dash on by. Each track helps to define the rhythm of combat or exploration. Enemies gather around you to lob carefully synchronized attacks, while a directional meter lets you know when to strike it back. Giant soundwave attacks demand you either leap or slide your way to safety, and it all comes together in the game’s later stages to create a beautiful maelstrom of action. The music is, as advertised, an amazing and eclectic mix of hard-hitting EDM and more tranquil house music beats. BLiNd’s work might not be for everyone (to say nothing of the genre as a whole), but the marriage between Tinimations’ aesthetic and composer Jordan Aguirre’s infectious rhythms are undeniably beautiful. Rather than a simple backdrop, the soundtrack plays a vital role in determining movement during combat and exploration. The heady thud-thud-thud of a classic EDM beat, coupled with a damaging force field that blinks on and off of a wall, dictates how you must traverse upwards using a classic wall jump maneuver. Much like a music aficionado might use a song’s rhythm to guess what’s coming next (think the “drop” in nearly any EDM song), so must the player, learning to duck and leap away from the next attack, or avoid the deadly searchlights of stationary enemies. The problem begins (and for the most part, ends) with how Klang’s gameplay manages to detract from the success of this marriage. Even for fans of gaming’s most difficult genres and franchises (twitch shooters, Dark Souls), Klang is an astonishingly difficult, often frustrating experience. What issues Klang’s demo had could easily be chalked up to an unfamiliarity with the game’s mechanics, but spread out over the two to four hours of available content, those issues become omnipresent. Even on the game’s lowest difficulty, and employing a “reflex mode” that briefly slows down time when taking significant damage, Klang’s frantic action and occasional one-hit kills proved to be way too much to handle. While the game is great about putting you back in the action almost immediately, you’ll die so often that it won’t feel like it matters, putting you in the position of getting frustrated, and thus unable to concentrate, leading to more deaths. While taking on one of the game’s bosses, I found myself stuck between his constant attacks, a deadly pit of energy behind me, and a continuous gust of wind that threatened to push me into it. I had already gotten used to the mechanics of leaping and ducking to avoid massive soundwave attacks from this boss, but while the game does give you a fair bit of health, all it took was one mismanaged jump (while also deflecting regular attacks) for me to lose my momentum and get swept into the pit. If it’s not the pit, it will be one of the countless, twitchy “security cameras” you must run by without being spotted once for fear of being zapped. If it’s not the cameras, it might be the rapidly dissipating platforms that only solidify once you’ve executed one of 30 precarious jump-deflect combos. If it’s not any one of those things, it will be some combination. You will die. Incredibly often. And as beautiful as bLiNd’s music is, as much as I’m dying to listen to it all over again, you will grow so familiar with the first 10-20 seconds of each track that they begin to lose their luster. Klang almost certainly plays to the kind of gamer that enjoys a ludicrously demanding experience. Unfortunately, the game’s unforgiving nature will likely sour the experience for anyone who doesn’t seek out such a thing. One of the worst things a musician can do is stop their performance after making one, or even many, simple mistakes. Acknowledging and walking back on a commitment always seems less impressive than powering through an understandable, if human, error. You won’t find room for any error, much less human. Beyond the split-second reaction times, its level design is also occasionally flawed. During a boss battle that incorporated cones of vision (and one-hit deaths for being seen), three raised platforms above the boss’ head felt like indicators that aerial attacks wouldn’t work. This turned out to be completely false. Aerial attacks were the only method, but the level design, plus a rapidly shifting enemy cone of vision, plus an unforgiving checkpoint system quickly turned the battle into something as frustrating as it was inventive. Klang’s brilliant soundtrack and unique brand of action platforming would come across as a much more cohesive package if we were able to appreciate it at length and as a whole, rather than gritting our teeth and praying for a checkpoint. For those who do feel up to the challenge, beyond the normal difficulty setting, beating the game unlocks a “Nightcore” mode (maybe don’t Google that) that allows you to play at an even higher difficulty. Conclusion: Klang still carries a sincere sense of recommendation, if only based on its incredibly inventive style and incorporation of music. We don’t often get a game, indie or otherwise, that has the courage to tackle music with such ingenuity. Tinimations’ and bLiNd’s passion shows in every single beat, but their own concept gets too caught up in its own noodling to allow for lesser players to enjoy it to its fullest extent. Klang was reviewed on PC and is now available on Steam. View full article
  10. Review: Klang

    If there’s one lesson that 10 years of singing, instrument-playing, and dancing have taught me, it’s that the show must go on. The number of people I’ve seen take “break a leg” beyond pure metaphor, and still soldier on, genuinely astounds me. No matter the error, no matter the number of botched notes, or missed steps, you power through a performance with all you can, for surely the alternative is always worse. For a game so wrapped up in the power of music, it’s odd to see Klang (developed by the one-man team at Tinimations and composed by EDM guru Jordan Aguirre AKA “bLiNd”) take so much of its ethos to heart, and yet stumble on that one key point. As the cybergoth-inspired rave warrior, you’ll fight and headbang your way towards defeating the evil Soundlord Sonos in a world absolutely soaked with neon and musical minutia. Levels, many of which feel like they’re ripped from the stages of your favorite rock venue, pulse with each distinctive track’s beat. Streetlamps shaped like clef notes hang above your head as you dash on by. Each track helps to define the rhythm of combat or exploration. Enemies gather around you to lob carefully synchronized attacks, while a directional meter lets you know when to strike it back. Giant soundwave attacks demand you either leap or slide your way to safety, and it all comes together in the game’s later stages to create a beautiful maelstrom of action. The music is, as advertised, an amazing and eclectic mix of hard-hitting EDM and more tranquil house music beats. BLiNd’s work might not be for everyone (to say nothing of the genre as a whole), but the marriage between Tinimations’ aesthetic and composer Jordan Aguirre’s infectious rhythms are undeniably beautiful. Rather than a simple backdrop, the soundtrack plays a vital role in determining movement during combat and exploration. The heady thud-thud-thud of a classic EDM beat, coupled with a damaging force field that blinks on and off of a wall, dictates how you must traverse upwards using a classic wall jump maneuver. Much like a music aficionado might use a song’s rhythm to guess what’s coming next (think the “drop” in nearly any EDM song), so must the player, learning to duck and leap away from the next attack, or avoid the deadly searchlights of stationary enemies. The problem begins (and for the most part, ends) with how Klang’s gameplay manages to detract from the success of this marriage. Even for fans of gaming’s most difficult genres and franchises (twitch shooters, Dark Souls), Klang is an astonishingly difficult, often frustrating experience. What issues Klang’s demo had could easily be chalked up to an unfamiliarity with the game’s mechanics, but spread out over the two to four hours of available content, those issues become omnipresent. Even on the game’s lowest difficulty, and employing a “reflex mode” that briefly slows down time when taking significant damage, Klang’s frantic action and occasional one-hit kills proved to be way too much to handle. While the game is great about putting you back in the action almost immediately, you’ll die so often that it won’t feel like it matters, putting you in the position of getting frustrated, and thus unable to concentrate, leading to more deaths. While taking on one of the game’s bosses, I found myself stuck between his constant attacks, a deadly pit of energy behind me, and a continuous gust of wind that threatened to push me into it. I had already gotten used to the mechanics of leaping and ducking to avoid massive soundwave attacks from this boss, but while the game does give you a fair bit of health, all it took was one mismanaged jump (while also deflecting regular attacks) for me to lose my momentum and get swept into the pit. If it’s not the pit, it will be one of the countless, twitchy “security cameras” you must run by without being spotted once for fear of being zapped. If it’s not the cameras, it might be the rapidly dissipating platforms that only solidify once you’ve executed one of 30 precarious jump-deflect combos. If it’s not any one of those things, it will be some combination. You will die. Incredibly often. And as beautiful as bLiNd’s music is, as much as I’m dying to listen to it all over again, you will grow so familiar with the first 10-20 seconds of each track that they begin to lose their luster. Klang almost certainly plays to the kind of gamer that enjoys a ludicrously demanding experience. Unfortunately, the game’s unforgiving nature will likely sour the experience for anyone who doesn’t seek out such a thing. One of the worst things a musician can do is stop their performance after making one, or even many, simple mistakes. Acknowledging and walking back on a commitment always seems less impressive than powering through an understandable, if human, error. You won’t find room for any error, much less human. Beyond the split-second reaction times, its level design is also occasionally flawed. During a boss battle that incorporated cones of vision (and one-hit deaths for being seen), three raised platforms above the boss’ head felt like indicators that aerial attacks wouldn’t work. This turned out to be completely false. Aerial attacks were the only method, but the level design, plus a rapidly shifting enemy cone of vision, plus an unforgiving checkpoint system quickly turned the battle into something as frustrating as it was inventive. Klang’s brilliant soundtrack and unique brand of action platforming would come across as a much more cohesive package if we were able to appreciate it at length and as a whole, rather than gritting our teeth and praying for a checkpoint. For those who do feel up to the challenge, beyond the normal difficulty setting, beating the game unlocks a “Nightcore” mode (maybe don’t Google that) that allows you to play at an even higher difficulty. Conclusion: Klang still carries a sincere sense of recommendation, if only based on its incredibly inventive style and incorporation of music. We don’t often get a game, indie or otherwise, that has the courage to tackle music with such ingenuity. Tinimations’ and bLiNd’s passion shows in every single beat, but their own concept gets too caught up in its own noodling to allow for lesser players to enjoy it to its fullest extent. Klang was reviewed on PC and is now available on Steam.
  11. Even as gaming culture becomes more and more tied to the world of music (bringing us annual celebrations like MAGfest and touring acts like Video Games Live), a game’s soundtrack is still a very special thing when incorporated as more than a backdrop or blanketing force. Klang, developed by the one-man operation at Tinimations and scored by famed electronic dance music artist bLiNd, capitalizes on this and then some. Every second of frenetic action and inch of its environment is soaked with pulse-pounding music, making it one of the most promising rhythm action games in years. In Klang, players fill the cybergoth-inspired shoes of an elite rave warrior. If that combination of words sounds weird to you, buckle up. After crashing a rave party hosted by the cruel Soundlord Sonus, the rave warrior must fight for his freedom against the malicious titan and his loyal, audio-bending army. Imagine if instead of vengeful rage, God of War’s Kratos fueled himself on infectious rhythm – and maybe some illicit drugs – and you’ve got Klang. What follows is an ever-increasing drive of frantically paced combat and platforming, all dictated by and perfectly synched to bLiNd’s aggressive soundtrack. Meters on all sides of the main character fill up, teaching you when to strike just as a note is sharply punctuated, deflecting enemy attacks with your tuning fork blades (yeah) and emitting a powerful blast back at them. Leaping from wall to wall to clamber up a narrow passage locks you in perfect rhythm with the underlying beat, a heady thud-thud-thud that every electronic music fan knows all too well. It goes a long way in both ramping up the intensity of a particularly confrontational boss or just teaching a player how to deal with a new attack. Every EDM fan lives for the “beat drop,” and Klang works a pure sense of magic into how well this crescendo fits into its demanding combat. Whereas a more retro-inspired game might default to a traditional chiptune soundtrack, the fact that Klang’s identity is so wrapped up in its own musical style (not an exclusive one, but certainly never grasped onto with such strength) makes every moment a thrilling one. It would be enough if Klang’s world were only so infused with such great audio, but developer Tom-Ivar Arntzen also builds an aesthetic that’s as much Tron: Legacy as it is European warehouse rave. Attacks from certain enemies shoot out in the form of an equalizer wave, combat stages look like the mosh pit at a concert, platforming sections look almost like sheet music, with streetlights built to look like clef notes. So far as we know, all of Klang’s narrative is communicated without dialogue, emphasizing the importance of this music-infused world and the craziness that goes on in it. Klang is expected to release before the end of 2016 on Steam for PC, featuring two to four hours of gameplay and music from bLiNd. A “Nightcore” mode (don’t google that) will also be available to challenge players looking for an even tougher challenge.
  12. Even as gaming culture becomes more and more tied to the world of music (bringing us annual celebrations like MAGfest and touring acts like Video Games Live), a game’s soundtrack is still a very special thing when incorporated as more than a backdrop or blanketing force. Klang, developed by the one-man operation at Tinimations and scored by famed electronic dance music artist bLiNd, capitalizes on this and then some. Every second of frenetic action and inch of its environment is soaked with pulse-pounding music, making it one of the most promising rhythm action games in years. In Klang, players fill the cybergoth-inspired shoes of an elite rave warrior. If that combination of words sounds weird to you, buckle up. After crashing a rave party hosted by the cruel Soundlord Sonus, the rave warrior must fight for his freedom against the malicious titan and his loyal, audio-bending army. Imagine if instead of vengeful rage, God of War’s Kratos fueled himself on infectious rhythm – and maybe some illicit drugs – and you’ve got Klang. What follows is an ever-increasing drive of frantically paced combat and platforming, all dictated by and perfectly synched to bLiNd’s aggressive soundtrack. Meters on all sides of the main character fill up, teaching you when to strike just as a note is sharply punctuated, deflecting enemy attacks with your tuning fork blades (yeah) and emitting a powerful blast back at them. Leaping from wall to wall to clamber up a narrow passage locks you in perfect rhythm with the underlying beat, a heady thud-thud-thud that every electronic music fan knows all too well. It goes a long way in both ramping up the intensity of a particularly confrontational boss or just teaching a player how to deal with a new attack. Every EDM fan lives for the “beat drop,” and Klang works a pure sense of magic into how well this crescendo fits into its demanding combat. Whereas a more retro-inspired game might default to a traditional chiptune soundtrack, the fact that Klang’s identity is so wrapped up in its own musical style (not an exclusive one, but certainly never grasped onto with such strength) makes every moment a thrilling one. It would be enough if Klang’s world were only so infused with such great audio, but developer Tom-Ivar Arntzen also builds an aesthetic that’s as much Tron: Legacy as it is European warehouse rave. Attacks from certain enemies shoot out in the form of an equalizer wave, combat stages look like the mosh pit at a concert, platforming sections look almost like sheet music, with streetlights built to look like clef notes. So far as we know, all of Klang’s narrative is communicated without dialogue, emphasizing the importance of this music-infused world and the craziness that goes on in it. Klang is expected to release before the end of 2016 on Steam for PC, featuring two to four hours of gameplay and music from bLiNd. A “Nightcore” mode (don’t google that) will also be available to challenge players looking for an even tougher challenge. View full article
  13. until
    Champlain College hosts a 24 hour Game Day event every year on Champlain's campus. This year, the event is running from 9 AM on October 22nd to 9 AM on October 23rd with set up starting the night before at 6 PM on October 21st. We have everything from tabletop and video games to D&D Campaigns, Smash tournaments, Pokemon Showdown, a concert series, and this year we are hosting out first League of Legends Invitation Tournament! We provide two meals later at night and have tons of raffle prizes to give away! If you have any questions or would like to help out, contact Callie Browning at (770)853-6795 or calliembrowning@gmail.com
  14. STL PixelPop Festival

    until
    PixelPop Festival is a two-day festival celebrating games and game development. http://pixelpopfestival.com/
  15. Jacksonville guild reaching out here! I've just confirmed with the event director of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses that we'll be able to set up tables and recruit at the event. I'm spreading the word that they're open to other guilds coming out to their concerts. There are a couple dates coming up near you: 08/21/2016 - 8:00PM San Francisco, CA, USA Davies Symphony Hall Buy Now 12/10/2016 - TBD San Jose, CA, USA City National Civic TBD PM me if you would like their contact information to coordinate that.
  16. Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses

    Jacksonville guild reaching out here! I've just confirmed with the event director of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses that we'll be able to set up tables and recruit at the event. I'm spreading the word that they're open to other guilds coming out to their concerts. There are a couple dates coming up near you: 03/19/2016 - 8:00PM Toronto, ON, Canada Sony Centre Buy Now 11/11/2016 - 7:30PM Rochester, NY, USA Kodak Hall TBD PM me if you would like their contact information to coordinate that.
  17. Jacksonville guild reaching out here! I've just confirmed with the event director of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses that we'll be able to set up tables and recruit at the event. I'm spreading the word that they're open to other guilds coming out to their concerts. There are a couple dates coming up near you: 04/03/2016 - 7:30PM Columbus, OH, USA Ohio Theater Buy Now PM me if you would like their contact information to coordinate that.
  18. Jacksonville guild reaching out here! I've just confirmed with the event director of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses that we'll be able to set up tables and recruit at the event. I'm spreading the word that they're open to other guilds coming out to their concerts. There are a couple dates coming up near you: 03/24/2016 - 8:00PM Jacksonville, FL, USA Moran Theatre Buy Now PM me if you would like their contact information to coordinate that.
  19. GR8Bit

    http://www.gr8bitlive.com/
  20. Jacksonville guild reaching out here! I've just confirmed with the event director of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses that we'll be able to set up tables and recruit at the event. I'm spreading the word that they're open to other guilds coming out to their concerts. There are a couple dates coming up near you: 04/08/2016 - 7:30PM Charlottesville, VA, USA John Paul Jones Arena Buy Now PM me if you would like their contact information to coordinate that.
  21. Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses

    Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses http://zelda-symphony.com/ Location: Times Union-Moran Theater 300 Water Street, Jacksonville, FL 32207 Date/Time: Thursday March 24th, 8pm We'll have a booth set up. Volunteer slots are filled. Forum thread here: http://community.extra-life.org/forums/topic/3812-zelda-symphony-of-the-goddessses/
  22. Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses

    Jacksonville guild reaching out here! I've just confirmed with the event director of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses that we'll be able to set up tables and recruit at the event. I'm spreading the word that they're open to other guilds coming out to their concerts. There are a couple dates coming up near you: 09/21/2016 - 7:30PM Edmonton, AB, Canada Northern Jubilee Buy Now PM me if you would like their contact information to coordinate that.
  23. Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses

    Jacksonville guild reaching out here! I've just confirmed with the event director of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses that we'll be able to set up tables and recruit at the event. I'm spreading the word that they're open to other guilds coming out to their concerts. There are a couple dates coming up near you: 09/23/2016 - 7:30PM Vancouver, BC, Canada Queen Elizabeth Theatre Buy Now PM me if you would like their contact information to coordinate that.
  24. Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses

    Jacksonville guild reaching out here! I've just confirmed with the event director of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses that we'll be able to set up tables and recruit at the event. I'm spreading the word that they're open to other guilds coming out to their concerts. There are a couple dates coming up near you: 09/22/2016 - 7:30PM Calgary, AB, Canada Jack Singer Concert Hall TBD PM me if you would like their contact information to coordinate that.
  25. Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses http://zelda-symphony.com/ Location: Times Union-Moran Theater 300 Water Street, Jacksonville, FL 32207 Date/Time: Thursday March 24th, 8pm Volunteers – I need names to give for security clearance. Volunteers on security list. Anyone else that wants to help will need a ticket to be allowed inside. Joanna AnnaMarie Ashley Nichole Equipment I requested 2 tables and 5 chairs. We may be able to get more chairs if needed. Additional Info HAVE THE RECRUITMENT APP DOWNLOADED TO YOUR DEVICES!! Let me know if I missed anything or you have any questions!!!!!!!!