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Found 36 results

  1. Just when people thought their time on Pandora might be taking a hiatus, Telltale swoops in with a trailer that teases the first episode of their Borderlands series. Unfortunately, the trailer doesn't give any hints as to a release date, but it looks like Telltale is still planning to release it in 2014. While we were shown a preview of the first episode in action back during E3, the first episode finally has a name: Zero Sum. Additionally, we now know the official casting details, final casting details. The season will feature Troy Baker as Rhys, Laura Bailey as Fiona, Chris Hardwick as Vaughn, Erin Yvette as Sasha, Patrick Warburton as Vasquez, and Dameon Clarke reprising his role as Handsome Jack. We can also confirm that there will be five total episodes of the Tales from the Borderlands series. Tales from the Borderland will be available on PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, and PC, with some slight variations in price. It looks like the console versions will retail at around $4.99 per episode with season pass options for $19.99. The PC version will be a season pass for $24.99. Android and iOS devices will also see the first episode of the Telltale's Borderlands before the year is out.
  2. Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series made some waves when adventure game developer Telltale Games teased it at the tail end of last year. We now have a narrower release window with the series set to premiere this spring on consoles, PC, Android, and iOS. Much like Telltale's Game of Thrones, their Guardians of the Galaxy series will tell a new story set within the universe seen in the films. Familiar characters such as Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax, Rocket Raccoon, and Groot all return with a redesigned that aims to fit them in with the art style of Telltale's vision. The new tale follows the galactic group of reluctant heroes as they discover an artifact of immense power following a climactic encounter. Each member of the team has a competing interest in the item, but so does an enemy who represents the last of a dying race who will hunt the team to the ends of the galaxy to obtain it. The Guardians will be traveling to a wide number of locations including Earth, the starship Milano, the hollowed out space titan skull called Knowhere, and beyond to locations not seen in the films. Borrowing from the films (and Telltale's natural affinity for including fantastic musical accompaniments to their games), the Guardians of the Galaxy series will feature a licensed soundtrack of its own to help players slip into the retro-camp fun in store for them. today at PAX East in Boston at 6pm in the Albatross Theater, so if you are at the show be sure to stop and give it a look. Telltale Games will be hosting a panel discussing their creative process on the title. Those who can't be there in person can check it out live on Twitch. Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series premiers on March 17 at SXSW in Austin, TX at the Paramount Theater. Telltale will be hosting a Crowd Play event where attendees can help decide what decisions are made on the big screen during the live gameplay via their mobile devices. In order to attend, interested people will need to obtain either an SXSW or SXSW Gaming badge and seats will be available on a first come, first serve basis. The voices for the Guardians of the Galaxy series won't be the same as the ones from the movies. Instead, Scott Porter (Friday Night Lights, The Walking Dead: The Telltale Series) will take on the role of Star-Lord, Emily O'Brien (Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor) tackles Gamora, Nolan North (basically all games with voice acting, Uncharted) becomes Rocket Raccoon, Brandon Paul Eells (Watch Dogs) gives life to Drax, and Adam Harrington (The Wolf Among Us, League of Legends) groots his best as Groot. Guardians of the Galaxy 2 releases on May 5 and with a narrower release day centered on this spring, I'd be willing to bet Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series will be releasing around that same time, possibly in late April.
  3. Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series made some waves when adventure game developer Telltale Games teased it at the tail end of last year. We now have a narrower release window with the series set to premiere this spring on consoles, PC, Android, and iOS. Much like Telltale's Game of Thrones, their Guardians of the Galaxy series will tell a new story set within the universe seen in the films. Familiar characters such as Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax, Rocket Raccoon, and Groot all return with a redesigned that aims to fit them in with the art style of Telltale's vision. The new tale follows the galactic group of reluctant heroes as they discover an artifact of immense power following a climactic encounter. Each member of the team has a competing interest in the item, but so does an enemy who represents the last of a dying race who will hunt the team to the ends of the galaxy to obtain it. The Guardians will be traveling to a wide number of locations including Earth, the starship Milano, the hollowed out space titan skull called Knowhere, and beyond to locations not seen in the films. Borrowing from the films (and Telltale's natural affinity for including fantastic musical accompaniments to their games), the Guardians of the Galaxy series will feature a licensed soundtrack of its own to help players slip into the retro-camp fun in store for them. today at PAX East in Boston at 6pm in the Albatross Theater, so if you are at the show be sure to stop and give it a look. Telltale Games will be hosting a panel discussing their creative process on the title. Those who can't be there in person can check it out live on Twitch. Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series premiers on March 17 at SXSW in Austin, TX at the Paramount Theater. Telltale will be hosting a Crowd Play event where attendees can help decide what decisions are made on the big screen during the live gameplay via their mobile devices. In order to attend, interested people will need to obtain either an SXSW or SXSW Gaming badge and seats will be available on a first come, first serve basis. The voices for the Guardians of the Galaxy series won't be the same as the ones from the movies. Instead, Scott Porter (Friday Night Lights, The Walking Dead: The Telltale Series) will take on the role of Star-Lord, Emily O'Brien (Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor) tackles Gamora, Nolan North (basically all games with voice acting, Uncharted) becomes Rocket Raccoon, Brandon Paul Eells (Watch Dogs) gives life to Drax, and Adam Harrington (The Wolf Among Us, League of Legends) groots his best as Groot. Guardians of the Galaxy 2 releases on May 5 and with a narrower release day centered on this spring, I'd be willing to bet Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy: The Telltale Series will be releasing around that same time, possibly in late April. View full article
  4. Most people know Dream Theater as a progressive metal band from the mid 80s that has released albums on and off for the past thirty years. While that would generally lead to a band fading into obscurity, Dream Theater does not go quietly into that good night. The band has partnered with Norwegian indie developer Turbo Tape Games to create a game based on their 2016 album The Astonishing. The game, titled The Astonishing Game, allows players to take part in the album's rock opera storyline, which delves into a conflict between artists and a totalitarian government. It features digital likenesses of the band members and various other musicians as they do battle with the machines of an empire to win over the general population. The turn-based strategy game allows players to choose to side with the musicians or the authoritarians. The game comes with a single-player campaign and a multiplayer mode to challenge other Dream Theater fans (or those curious about what a Dream Theater game would be like). On top of that, players can be eligible to win prizes by playing The Astonishing Game. Those who play can win tickets to upcoming shows, backstage passes, signed merch, and more. The rules for winning prizes can be found on Turbo Tape Games' website. You can grab The Astonishing Game on PC, Mac, iOS, and Android devices.
  5. Most people know Dream Theater as a progressive metal band from the mid 80s that has released albums on and off for the past thirty years. While that would generally lead to a band fading into obscurity, Dream Theater does not go quietly into that good night. The band has partnered with Norwegian indie developer Turbo Tape Games to create a game based on their 2016 album The Astonishing. The game, titled The Astonishing Game, allows players to take part in the album's rock opera storyline, which delves into a conflict between artists and a totalitarian government. It features digital likenesses of the band members and various other musicians as they do battle with the machines of an empire to win over the general population. The turn-based strategy game allows players to choose to side with the musicians or the authoritarians. The game comes with a single-player campaign and a multiplayer mode to challenge other Dream Theater fans (or those curious about what a Dream Theater game would be like). On top of that, players can be eligible to win prizes by playing The Astonishing Game. Those who play can win tickets to upcoming shows, backstage passes, signed merch, and more. The rules for winning prizes can be found on Turbo Tape Games' website. You can grab The Astonishing Game on PC, Mac, iOS, and Android devices. View full article
  6. There are games tinged with strangeness and there are games that revel in oddity that make their way into mainstream gaming, but I recently discovered a developer that seems to have cornered the market on bafflingly bizarre mobile games. Usaya, a Japanese developer that has been working on small games for iOS and Android since 2013, thoroughly earns its title as weirdest mobile game developer. I took the last few days to play some of their most popular titles and here is what I found. 採用セヨ!【キモい候補者を面接だ!】 Like most of Usaya's library, their first game's name isn't officially translated on the app store, but Google's translation dubs it "Hiring Ado! 【Interview a cheap candidate! 】". The game text of Hiring Ado! was never translated into English either, so I learned everything about it purely through trial and error. The basic premise has players interviewing candidates for a job and sorting the candidates as quickly as possible. However, some of the applicants are aliens and can't be allowed at work. The aliens are distinguished by their variety of vegetable, squid, mushroom, or typical green heads. Players have a set amount of time to get through candidates without hiring an alien or booting a human. The gameplay might be very simplistic, but the visuals will, uh, certainly stick with you. ちくわ猫~超シュールでかわいい新感覚、無料にゃんこゲーム~ The second game in Usaya's mobile lineup feels perhaps the closest to what a normal mobile game might be. The title translates roughly to "Chikuwa cat ~ Cute new sense with super surreal, free Nyanko game ~" and that's a pretty apt description of the game itself. Chikuwa is a Japanese food roll, and Usaya's chikuwa cat jumps from chikuwa roll to chikuwa roll. Players must try to go through as many rolls as possible, timing their jumps perfectly, before running out of lives. A boss encounter occurs every so often in which the titular chikuwa cat must smack into the boss a few times before continuing. The minimalist presentation definitely sets it apart from Hiring Ado!, while the gameplay reminds me of jumping from barrel to barrel in Donkey Kong Country. So far, you might be thinking that these aren't terribly odd. The alien game was a bit weird, but this second game seemed relatively normal. Strap yourselves in, dear reader, because we are about to go a bit silly. うさぎと牛乳瓶 Have you ever dreamed of saving cute, little rabbits horrifically trapped inside of empty milk bottles? Then Usaya's "Usagi and milk bottle" is the game for you! Players have a set amount of time to swipe the screen, pulling cartoon rabbits out of their glass prisons. Use caution while saving those animals, however, because someone has left live grenades in a few of the milk jars! If you throw them in with all the rabbits... well... no one wants that to happen. There are also small humans and human-bunny hybrids that have found themselves in the same predicament as the rabbits? I think they might give point bonuses or extend the remaining time, but I'm not entirely sure since everything is in Japanese. It's such an odd concept, but the visuals come across as so endearing that it just makes you give a bemused smile. Daikon Joshi Usaya's fourth game, Daikon Joshi, has a very simple, straightforward description in the app store: "In this action game you play as a high school girl who climbs up a radish." That is exactly what the game is about. I don't know why or for what purpose, but the world this high school girl inhabits houses radishes of increasing height. Players make her climb each radish by tapping on the screen. Reaching the top in record time is made more difficult by obstacles like protruding radish roots. It's... um... quite something. I don't know whether to laugh or be subtly creeped out by it. All of these are nothing, however, to the crown jewel and most recent game in Usaya's growing library of peculiarities. My Horse Prince I honestly don't know what to write about My Horse Prince, but it is both the weirdest thing Usaya has made and, as far as I can tell, its most popular game. As opposed to the touch-control gameplay of all their previous titles, Usaya opted to make My Horse Prince a narrative-focused visual novel. The plot follows a girl who goes out to a horse ranch one day to meet cute boys and discovers that she has a strange disease that makes her see human faces on horses and gives her the ability to speak with and understand them. Aaaaaand she finds the horse she is sucked into buying cute instead of mind-numbingly horrifying like a normal person. The reviews of My Horse Prince are overwhelmingly positive. One user by the name of Devin Spencer wrote, "This is the worst game I have ever played. I love it." Another described it as "a hot mess of fun and questionable ideas," and that's a great way of describing it. Usaya clearly meant My Horse Prince to be a comedy poking fun at the visual novel genre and how ridiculous some of the games in it can be - I'm looking at you, Hatoful Boyfriend. There are a few laughs both genuine and nervous to be had in the writing, but I'm not sure how many people can overcome the deeply disturbing human-faced horse. Remember when I said My Horse Prince was Usaya's most popular game? It was so popular that they went back and gave it an update that added three new chapters to the original ten. Let that sink in: My Horse Prince is now a thirteen chapter long visual novel game about a woman who falls in love with a horse. More than anything else, My Horse Prince solidifies Usaya's place as the weirdest mobile developer. I'm glad they're out there being the wild card of the mobile gaming space because some developer has to take that title and own it. All their games are free on the Android and iOS app stores, though some include microtransactions to remove ads. Where does Usaya go from here? I have absolutely no idea, but chances are their next project will be completely unexpected and jaw-droppingly strange.
  7. There are games tinged with strangeness and there are games that revel in oddity that make their way into mainstream gaming, but I recently discovered a developer that seems to have cornered the market on bafflingly bizarre mobile games. Usaya, a Japanese developer that has been working on small games for iOS and Android since 2013, thoroughly earns its title as weirdest mobile game developer. I took the last few days to play some of their most popular titles and here is what I found. 採用セヨ!【キモい候補者を面接だ!】 Like most of Usaya's library, their first game's name isn't officially translated on the app store, but Google's translation dubs it "Hiring Ado! 【Interview a cheap candidate! 】". The game text of Hiring Ado! was never translated into English either, so I learned everything about it purely through trial and error. The basic premise has players interviewing candidates for a job and sorting the candidates as quickly as possible. However, some of the applicants are aliens and can't be allowed at work. The aliens are distinguished by their variety of vegetable, squid, mushroom, or typical green heads. Players have a set amount of time to get through candidates without hiring an alien or booting a human. The gameplay might be very simplistic, but the visuals will, uh, certainly stick with you. ちくわ猫~超シュールでかわいい新感覚、無料にゃんこゲーム~ The second game in Usaya's mobile lineup feels perhaps the closest to what a normal mobile game might be. The title translates roughly to "Chikuwa cat ~ Cute new sense with super surreal, free Nyanko game ~" and that's a pretty apt description of the game itself. Chikuwa is a Japanese food roll, and Usaya's chikuwa cat jumps from chikuwa roll to chikuwa roll. Players must try to go through as many rolls as possible, timing their jumps perfectly, before running out of lives. A boss encounter occurs every so often in which the titular chikuwa cat must smack into the boss a few times before continuing. The minimalist presentation definitely sets it apart from Hiring Ado!, while the gameplay reminds me of jumping from barrel to barrel in Donkey Kong Country. So far, you might be thinking that these aren't terribly odd. The alien game was a bit weird, but this second game seemed relatively normal. Strap yourselves in, dear reader, because we are about to go a bit silly. うさぎと牛乳瓶 Have you ever dreamed of saving cute, little rabbits horrifically trapped inside of empty milk bottles? Then Usaya's "Usagi and milk bottle" is the game for you! Players have a set amount of time to swipe the screen, pulling cartoon rabbits out of their glass prisons. Use caution while saving those animals, however, because someone has left live grenades in a few of the milk jars! If you throw them in with all the rabbits... well... no one wants that to happen. There are also small humans and human-bunny hybrids that have found themselves in the same predicament as the rabbits? I think they might give point bonuses or extend the remaining time, but I'm not entirely sure since everything is in Japanese. It's such an odd concept, but the visuals come across as so endearing that it just makes you give a bemused smile. Daikon Joshi Usaya's fourth game, Daikon Joshi, has a very simple, straightforward description in the app store: "In this action game you play as a high school girl who climbs up a radish." That is exactly what the game is about. I don't know why or for what purpose, but the world this high school girl inhabits houses radishes of increasing height. Players make her climb each radish by tapping on the screen. Reaching the top in record time is made more difficult by obstacles like protruding radish roots. It's... um... quite something. I don't know whether to laugh or be subtly creeped out by it. All of these are nothing, however, to the crown jewel and most recent game in Usaya's growing library of peculiarities. My Horse Prince I honestly don't know what to write about My Horse Prince, but it is both the weirdest thing Usaya has made and, as far as I can tell, its most popular game. As opposed to the touch-control gameplay of all their previous titles, Usaya opted to make My Horse Prince a narrative-focused visual novel. The plot follows a girl who goes out to a horse ranch one day to meet cute boys and discovers that she has a strange disease that makes her see human faces on horses and gives her the ability to speak with and understand them. Aaaaaand she finds the horse she is sucked into buying cute instead of mind-numbingly horrifying like a normal person. The reviews of My Horse Prince are overwhelmingly positive. One user by the name of Devin Spencer wrote, "This is the worst game I have ever played. I love it." Another described it as "a hot mess of fun and questionable ideas," and that's a great way of describing it. Usaya clearly meant My Horse Prince to be a comedy poking fun at the visual novel genre and how ridiculous some of the games in it can be - I'm looking at you, Hatoful Boyfriend. There are a few laughs both genuine and nervous to be had in the writing, but I'm not sure how many people can overcome the deeply disturbing human-faced horse. Remember when I said My Horse Prince was Usaya's most popular game? It was so popular that they went back and gave it an update that added three new chapters to the original ten. Let that sink in: My Horse Prince is now a thirteen chapter long visual novel game about a woman who falls in love with a horse. More than anything else, My Horse Prince solidifies Usaya's place as the weirdest mobile developer. I'm glad they're out there being the wild card of the mobile gaming space because some developer has to take that title and own it. All their games are free on the Android and iOS app stores, though some include microtransactions to remove ads. Where does Usaya go from here? I have absolutely no idea, but chances are their next project will be completely unexpected and jaw-droppingly strange. View full article
  8. I have the pleasure of being involved in Extra Life both as a writer on this website and in a local capacity with the Minneapolis Extra Life Guild. Through my involvement in the guild I managed to connect with Dylan Zellmer who provides the social face for MurWare, an independent development studio that released their first game, titled Oley Poley, a little over two weeks ago. MurWare has decided that charity is a core part of their business and will be donating 5% of the profits from Oley Poley to Extra Life! That is just so great that I decided to have a chat with Dylan about the studio and what it is like to be a relatively unknown game developer. --- Jack Gardner: I'm going to be honest, I don't know much about MurWare. Could you tell me a bit about how MurWare came into existence and what it is all about? Dylan Zellmer: There's good reason for your unfamiliarity; we're brand new! Myself and two skilled programmers (Aaron and Ryan) decided to formulate MurWare about 60 days ago. Most of us have either been directly involved in the games industry, or have been toying with games creation for a long time. At its heart, MurWare is the quintessential independent development company. We want to keep our operations relatively small, and will likely hold onto our day jobs while creating and self-publishing fun games. It's likely we'll stick to the mobile games as we hone our skills, and set out to the PC and console space later-on. JG: What is your role in the company and the development process? DZ: I'm the artist. So far, I've been tasked with taking the overarching game ideas and bringing them to life visually. Being a three-man team, we collaborate on just about everything. I've also taken the helm on the social aspects of MurWare, and our outreach. We're hoping to find someone (FREE) to manage that piece as it's rather taxing on top of the rest of our work. JG: As a developer, what are your priorities for the games you make? DZ: Well, as an indie we aren't concerned with creating the next Call of Duty. Essentially, we're making games for ourselves, and are really stoked when other people enjoy them. From a design standpoint, I'm concerned with creating clean visuals that compliment our gameplay; gameplay being the most important aspect of our creative process. If we don't think something is fun to play, we won't let it past the early prototype phase. JG: Could you describe some of the challenges in being a game developer working on that company's first game and getting it onto the Android and iOS app stores? DZ: There are several, very real obstacles for us to overcome. It's amazing when you think of a studio like Supercell hitting the jackpot with their first outing (Clash of Clans). First off, staying organized and having any semblance of a plan to work with is problematic when we aren't devoted to the process full-time. Another large undertaking is discoverability. Even after making plenty of connections within the industry, it's not easy to get your app in front of key people. In the end, whatever success, or lack thereof, Oley Poley garners is an important step in the evolution of our studio. JG: On July 18, MurWare released Oley Poley for Android and (soon) iOS, could you tell me a bit about that game? DZ: Well, I describe Oley Poley as "The Dark Souls of cute and cuddly reverse-platformers"; whatever that means. A more general description of the game would sound something like an informercial, but I'll take a stab at it. It's inspired by the Coin-Op arcade games all of us used to shove our allowances into. It's fast-paced, extremely challenging, and wonderfully satisfying. The object of Oley Poley is to help him survive a never-ending stream of obstacles, and while doing so, earn points for your hard work. JG: You are personally involved in the Minneapolis Extra Life Guild. What is your story with Extra Life?' DZ: In 2013 I was introduced to Extra-Life by a long-time family friend. He thought it was a great opportunity for me to get involved in charitable giving while doing something I truly love; gaming. I thought it sounded like a perfect fit, formed a team (House Nerd), and raised more money than I'd ever hoped to. I was honored to donate to an institute that holds a very personal connection to another life-long friend whose son has received life-changing treatment therein; Gillette Children's Hospital. JG: MurWare is a relatively new studio, but you have already announced that 5% of the money earned from your games will go to charity and that this year's charity will be Extra Life! Not many devs, to my knowledge, give direct cuts of their game revenue. What led to the decision to make charity a priority for MurWare. DZ: To my knowledge (not extremely extensive, haven't dug for hours or anything) we're at least the only MN-based development team, possibly US-based development team, to give a direct cut of our profits to charity. (Editor’s note: MurWare is currently the only developer giving a direct cut of profits to Extra Life.) As I stated earlier, we all have day jobs, at the same company even, so our game dev career isn't ONLY about money; it's about doing something we love. The decision to give to charity was one that was made very early-on; it was important to all of us to do so. My hope is that we are able to receive enough exposure to start donating large amounts of financial support to great organizations like Extra-Life. As I mentioned earlier, discoverability is the hardest hurdle to overcome, so help us spread the word! --- It is absolutely amazing to be supported by a developer in this way! Thank you to the MurWare team for their support! Also, an update for the game was released today that includes new background music, art, and an updated logo. Oley Poley is currently available on the Google Play store for Android devices for $1.
  9. The critically acclaimed iOS indie adventure title Year Walk by developer Simogo is now available on PC and Mac via Steam. Adventure game aficionados and fans of creepiness, rejoice! Year Walk thrusts players into a beautiful, disturbing world set in Sweden during the 1800s. The protagonist is on a vision quest through a dark wood to get a glimpse of the future. Mythical monsters, confounding brain teasers, and bizarre sights await. The PC version boasts a few improvements over the mobile version. Some of the graphics have been overhauled and improved, new puzzles have been added, and a map now graces the game. Most importantly, the companion app that was meant to be downloaded and used along side the game to help work through the puzzles and decipher the myths and legends is now integrated directly into the game. Have any of you Extra Lifers out there played Year Walk? Planning on picking up the Steam version?
  10. UPDATE: Dong Nguyen has clarified why he decided to pull the plug on the latest mobile sensation. Nguyen gave an interview to Forbes that confirmed that Flappy Bird is gone forever and won't be coming back. Why did he decide to take his game off the app market? Turns out he did it as a form of public service. Nguyen stated during the interview that, "Flappy Bird was designed to play in a few minutes when you are relaxed, but it happened to become an addictive product. I think it has become a problem. To solve that problem, it’s best to take down Flappy Bird." Prior to taking down the game Nguyen couldn't sleep due to the guilt he felt over people's uncontrollable urge to play his game. When asked if he might regret his decision, he responded, “I don’t think it’s a mistake. I have thought it through.” Certainly this has been a very interesting situation, what do you think of Nguyen's stance on the success of his game? Can a game be too successful? Original Story: On Sunday, Dong Nguyen, the creator of the popular mobile game Flappy Bird tweeted that "he couldn't take this anymore" and that he would be taking it down within the next 22 hours. Today, Flappy Bird is no longer available on the Android or iOS. Flappy Bird met with massive success following its release, but left Nguyen feeling alienated and he eventually grew to hate the game. People can only speculate as to why Nguyen decided to take down Flappy Bird, but it could have to do with the harassment he received from "fans" or from the press coverage that disrupted his life. What will Dong Nguyen do post-Flappy Bird? His final tweet following the Flappy Bird take down announcement is simply, "And I still make games." We'll all look forward to whatever he makes next.
  11. The award-winning game Faster Than Light is receiving a free expansion that includes a slew of new features and it will now see an iOS release on the iPad. FTL, a beautiful, brutally difficult Rogue-like game, is one of my favorite indie games or the last few years. You take command of a spaceship tasked with warning the Federation of an impending attack by rebel forces. Every playthrough is drastically different and exhilarating, and players find them selves compelled to play again and again even though beating the game is a near herculean feat of micromanagement and luck. The expansion includes new tools, systems, and weapon abilities including: mind control, hacking, area of effect targeting, weapon overcharging, and basically more of everything. A new sector as well as new events have been added to the game, written by returning writer Tom Jubert and special guest Chris Avellone, who has worked on Planescape, Wasteland 2, and Project Eternity. Additionally, developer Subset games has listened to community feedback and added a few oft requested features like saving crew positions on the ship, the ability to save and quit during combat, and finding more items to purchase in stores. As someone who loves FTL, this is pretty much a dream come true. The PC and iPad versions will launch at the same time in early 2014. Subset will also be working to get FTL on Android tablets, but will not be bringing the title to phones due to the limited amount of interface space.
  12. In the midst of a hectic, crowded, and noisy E3 2013, there was a quieter (albeit only slightly) corner of the show floor. Out of curiosity and after being dazzled by the lights and bombast of the larger booths, I decided to wend my way through the smaller set-ups in this calmer section of the expo. I was approached by a representative of Blue Marble Games, a relatively new developer that focuses on creating games that are both fun and will hopefully help people with brain injuries, especially returning veterans. I was introduced to Nina Withrington, a physical therapist who works with the programmers and artists to help create Blue Marble’s games. At E3, Blue Marble was showing off a collection of games called RESeT, which collects information about performance that therapists will be able to use to identify problems with patient cognition like memory or attention span. I was able to chat with Nina about RESeT, Blue Marble, their other upcoming game Treasure of Bell Island, and their crowd-funding attempt, Zoezi Park. Jack Gardner: Why don’t you start at the beginning? Nina Withrington: To start from the beginning, this is a suite of games called RESeT. It basically has two parts: An assessment section and an intervention section. These games were made with funding from the Department of Defense for mild traumatic brain injury for the soldiers and veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan to serve them, because [brain injuries are] a big issue in that population. So, what we’ve done, we have a research team in-house, which I am a part of. I am a physical therapist. Bonnie here is an occupational therapist with a PhD in metrics and math and the owner of the company is a physical therapist and has a PhD in neural science. Garnder: Wow, so you’re a bunch of smart cookies! Withrington: [Laughs] We’re doing all right, we’re doing all right. Yeah, between us we have 75 years of clinical experience. It is really great that we get to work with a team of game designers, programmers, and artists to build these games from the ground up with clinical input in mind. So, going to the literature [and seeing] the current clinical guidelines, the evidence, what clinicians are using, and then inputting that into the game. That’s the whole idea behind this. [Gesturing to the table-sized touchscreen computer on which RESeT is running, Withrington begins flicking through the menus, showing me different features.] So, this is the assessive portion. You can see that it challenges different things that can be impaired in brain injuries: visual perception, visual-spatial inattention, memory, attention, executive function, which is organization and planning, coordination, and patient recorded outcomes. So, the game I’m going to show you here is called Asteroid Adventures and this is an assessment of executive function. It is our gamified version of a common test used in the clinic called 'the trail-making test.' [I took a couple seconds to look the game over. It appeared to consist of identifying the patter and order of numbers and letters in the sand and pressing them in the right order. As I am playing, matching the correct pattern, Withrington continues to talk.] The traditional test is done on paper with circles and a pencil. That’s the difference. Running in the background of all these games is a database that tracks every tap that is made on the screen. From that we can figure out what someone’s response time was, where they made an error, and what they did after they made an error. Did they keep tapping that same thing? Did they pause and make the same error? Did they pause and then make the right choice? That can tell us a lot about what is going on while they are doing an assessment. Another thing, on a big table like this we also know where you touched. [Withrington pulls out her laptop and shows me a map of the Asteroid Adventures. The image is identical to the game I just played, but there are red marks across the left side of the screen, while the right side is relatively clear.] This is actually some data from a person with a brain injury who played this in our offices and what you can see is that all of his mistakes were made on the left side of the screen. What that tells us is that he has some inattention to that side, which is common in brain injury, not necessarily in mild traumatic brain injury, but more severe brain injuries. We can collect that data, which is kind of neat. Let me show you one more thing… We’ll do the same test one more time, but a different version of it…. Just so you know, this suite of games is going to be at the clinical trials at Cedars-Saini* this summer. So, it will be a validation study of the assessment portion. Which is very exciting for us. Another thing about our games is that they are levelled, so that someone who is healthy can play these games and have just as much fun as someone with impairments. So, they level up and then they level down to a lower level. So, that way, if someone is going through the rehabilitation process their family can play with them, and they can play with their friends and they have something to talk about besides their injury. Which I think is really awesome, personally. I am going to show you one more evaluation. This is the same thing, but in this one, there is a line being drawn. Gardner: So, same kind of deal as before. Withrington: Yep, it is the same thing. The major difference being that you are getting this additional queue, right, so you know where you’ve been. Then I can show you the data and show you why that is interesting. [In the interest of time, Withrington does the level herself, performing admirably despite the level being upside down from her point of view, and once more pulls out her laptop to show me data.] This is what I wanted to show you. This blue line is the sandbox one, where you get this queue of where you’ve been, the line. This red one here is the one where you don’t get that queue. This was done with the same player with brain injury. You can see when he has the queue, he goes really fast in the sandbox. When he doesn’t have the queue, it takes him 3-4 times as long. That is a memory issue, where was I last? Trials B, where you switch between number and letter, he does about the same on both, which tells us he primary problem is memory, not flexible thinking. That’s the kind of granular data that you can glean from something that is on a platform like this and gives you data in the background. All of our games port to tablets and they play on the PC as well, so there are lots of platforms for them. We also have another game called Treasure of Bell Island, which is a strategic adventure game, and what happens is- I don’t have a tablet right now, but the player has a cast of characters and they have to solve the mystery of an island. They have to explore the island, they have to hunt to feed their crew, they have to keep their crew sheltered, and all of these things as they go along solving this mystery and collecting golden bells. Each of the mini-games challenges a different aspect of cognition, memory, attention, and executive function. So, there is a whole narrative, you have a purpose, and it is real-life, you have to think about others, not just yourself. So, that is a really great, fun game that we are doing as well. Gardner: Over time do these kinds of games improve that kind of mental cognition? Withrington: That’s a great question. These were literally just built. Gardner: So, we don’t know yet. Withrington: So, we don’t know yet, that’s the answer. But, we have taken the evidence from the literature and I can say they do challenge all of the impairments, but whether that will translate into real world will take lots of studies to figure out over years. In the meantime, this is what we’ve got and it can be used, in my estimation. Especially when you consider that therapists are taking games off the shelf and trying to make those work. Saying, ‘well, at least I am getting this challenged a little bit.’ You know, they are looking at it from a task analysis perspective and saying, ‘what is being challenged here and can I make that work?’ Gardner: Is this available now? Withrington: It will be available soon. Very, very soon. Gardner: And people would just be able to buy this on the Apple App Store, or…? Withrington: They could buy it from our website. That will be the first place you will be able to buy it. We’re not quite on iPad yet. We are working hard to get there, we have a preliminary build, but hopefully we will be. That’s the plan. But it can be played on PC if someone wanted to play on PC. Gardner: What is this going to cost? Will it be free? Withrington: No, that’s a great question. I am not the business person for Blue Marble, but I do know that we are committed to making these affordable. It will never cost more than an off-the-shelf game or what you would spend on a regular app. What would probably cost more would be if you wanted to know the data all the time. That takes a lot more maintenance on our end. But certainly, just to buy the game would be, you know, an average priced game, even though it has so much more going into it, like actual research. Gardner: When someone buys the game, how do they access the data? Withrington: The data is online. They can log in and see it there. Gardner: Would therapists be prescribing these games? Withrington: What’s great about our model here is that it could just be used by someone picking it up and wanting to use it or you can work with a therapist if you have impairments. The way I see these cognitive games is that they could be used as brain games too, because they level so high. But if you do have impairments, you probably should work with a therapist so they can help you through the game and develop strategies for you. In this game we have lots of mini-games as you go up in levels that challenge certain things specifically, so if a therapist has assessed someone, they can say, ‘you know, focus on these challenges, and don’t worry so much about these.’ Gardner: Are you working with other physical therapists not associated with the development? Withrington: Yes, all throughout our design process. It is what we call user-centered design. We go out and do focus groups with all of our end-users. That is clinicians, people with disabilities, caregivers, and family members. We get everybody’s input: What would be fun, what doesn’t work here, does this mechanic really disturb your vision, etc. We have to consider things like that. There are certain mechanics that we can’t do in games here. Is the art too complicated? These are things that are all barriers for [people with brain injuries to enjoy] entertainment games. Gardner: Can you tell me a little bit about how Blue Marble started? Withrington: Yes, absolutely. Dr. Sheryl Flynn is our CEO. She is a physical therapist and has a PhD in neural Science. She won a grant from the Department of Defense to make the Treasure of Bell Island game, which was our first game. Gardner: Treasure of Bell Island is out right now? Withrington: Almost. We just redid the art. So, probably in a month or two, that game will be out. Gardner: Also on the same platforms as RESeT? Withrington: Yes, on tablet and PC, working on the [iOS] process. So, anyway, she won the grant from the government to make that one and then we got a grant to make RESeT and we had gotten another small grant to create a prototype for a game that helps prevent falls in older adults, and that small grant enabled us to create a very basic prototype with just one or two exercises in it, but we want to put in a whole suite of exercises from the Otago exercise program, which has been shown to prevent falls in older adults by 35%. We would love to get the generations playing together and doing that. We are doing crowd funding to raise money to hopefully be able to build out that game. It is Whenyouwish.com and the game is called Zoezi Park and Zoezi is Swahili for exercise. Because you have to train balance to maintain balance and I know as our population ages it is a very big public health issue and just a caring-about-our-seniors issue. I think that what Blue Marble Games is trying to do is pretty great, and not something that we see very often in the video game industry. Check out their products and their stuff if you want to see something unique in the industry. For more information on RESeT go here. *Cedars-Saini is a non-profit hospital that also functions as an academic center for health science.
  13. This week Daniel Jones flies solo in an Honorable Mention dedicated to the zen mobile game Alto's Adventure. The endless runner (endless ski-er?) utterly captivated Daniel in early 2015 and has been a game he has found difficult to put down ever since. The premier effort from studio Snowman it managed to generate some significant buzz in the mainstream press who praised its quality. Take a ride with Daniel as he takes you down the slopes of the thoroughly enchanting indie skiing odyssey. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Chrono Trigger 'Neuga, Ziena, Zieber, Zom...' by The OC Jazz Collective and Wiesty (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03411) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes (consider leaving a review!). A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  14. This week Daniel Jones flies solo in an Honorable Mention dedicated to the zen mobile game Alto's Adventure. The endless runner (endless ski-er?) utterly captivated Daniel in early 2015 and has been a game he has found difficult to put down ever since. The premier effort from studio Snowman it managed to generate some significant buzz in the mainstream press who praised its quality. Take a ride with Daniel as he takes you down the slopes of the thoroughly enchanting indie skiing odyssey. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Chrono Trigger 'Neuga, Ziena, Zieber, Zom...' by The OC Jazz Collective and Wiesty (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03411) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes (consider leaving a review!). A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  15. Hey Extra Life Community - We have some exciting news to share! In an effort to help make fundraising more fun, more accessible and ultimately easier, we’ve added two new applications to the Extra Life experience. Now you can fundraise through Facebook or on the go from your phone! Extra Life Facebook App Fundraising has never been quicker or easier than with the new Extra Life Facebook App. It installs in just a few seconds and allows you to opt-in to automatic status updates, upload Extra Life profile and cover pictures and ask your entire Facebook network for donations in just a few clicks. To start fundraising through the Extra Life Facebook App, login to to your Extra Life account, and click "Fundraise with Facebook" in the participant dashboard. Extra Life Mobile App Manage and share your Extra Life experience on the go with our new Extra Life mobile app. This free app lets you fundraise and connect with others through SMS, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn & Email. You can update your Extra Life page and check your fundraising progress all from the palm of your hand. Download the app here: iPhone | Android We’ve also spent the last couple of months improving the mobile experience on the Extra Life website so give the new apps a try. We want to hear what you think so send any feedback and ideas to community@extra-life.org or comment below and let us know! For The Kids, Mike Kinney Team Extra Life Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals
  16. Google has officially unveiled their new VR product. Titled Daydream View, their VR device operates similarly to Samsung's Gear VR. Customers insert their smart phone into the device and use it as the VR screen. It doesn't seem to be something that will be in direct competition with dedicated VR platforms like Oculus, PSVR, or the HTC Vive, but it comes with the significantly smaller price tag of $80. This puts it at a slightly cheaper price than Samsung's device that also makes use of smart phones. The Daydream View will come with a single, small motion-controller to help play VR games and apps. It's compatible with Google's recently announced Pixel phone or "any Daydream-ready phone." Google has been understandably cagey about that last part; they want to sell their Pixel phone after all. Turns out that not many smart phones on the market are ready for what Google considers Daydream-ready. In fact, only one phone has actually been given that stamp of approval: Google's own Pixel. Rumors are swirling that advanced phones like ZTE's Axon 7 will be made compatible at a later date, but when the Pixel launches it will be the first one ready for Google's Daydream View. Google has said that the device will have over 50 apps available by the end of the year and hundreds more in the future. Daydream View officially launches sometime in November. It will be interesting to see how successful a cheaper competitor to the Gear VR will fare on the open market this holiday season. While it won't have the horsepower to compete with its beefier PC and console cousins, Daydream could open the door to more casual, mobile VR experiences. What do you think? Will you be picking up one of these contraptions next month?
  17. Google has officially unveiled their new VR product. Titled Daydream View, their VR device operates similarly to Samsung's Gear VR. Customers insert their smart phone into the device and use it as the VR screen. It doesn't seem to be something that will be in direct competition with dedicated VR platforms like Oculus, PSVR, or the HTC Vive, but it comes with the significantly smaller price tag of $80. This puts it at a slightly cheaper price than Samsung's device that also makes use of smart phones. The Daydream View will come with a single, small motion-controller to help play VR games and apps. It's compatible with Google's recently announced Pixel phone or "any Daydream-ready phone." Google has been understandably cagey about that last part; they want to sell their Pixel phone after all. Turns out that not many smart phones on the market are ready for what Google considers Daydream-ready. In fact, only one phone has actually been given that stamp of approval: Google's own Pixel. Rumors are swirling that advanced phones like ZTE's Axon 7 will be made compatible at a later date, but when the Pixel launches it will be the first one ready for Google's Daydream View. Google has said that the device will have over 50 apps available by the end of the year and hundreds more in the future. Daydream View officially launches sometime in November. It will be interesting to see how successful a cheaper competitor to the Gear VR will fare on the open market this holiday season. While it won't have the horsepower to compete with its beefier PC and console cousins, Daydream could open the door to more casual, mobile VR experiences. What do you think? Will you be picking up one of these contraptions next month? View full article
  18. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Jeremy Brown flies solo this week with an episode talking about the show's first mobile game: You Must Build A Boat. A match-3 game from early 2015 that took the mobile world by storm, garnering accolades and perfect scores from across the industry. A sequel to 1000000, Touch Arcade stated that You Must Build A Boat "makes the original game feel like a demo. It’s absurdly fun and nearly impossible to put down." What earns it a spot worthy of highlighting on The Best Games Period as an Honorable Mention? Listen and learn. Outro music: Undertale 'Make Your Life Hell' by LongBoxofChocolate (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03424) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes (consider leaving a review!). A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  19. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Jeremy Brown flies solo this week with an episode talking about the show's first mobile game: You Must Build A Boat. A match-3 game from early 2015 that took the mobile world by storm, garnering accolades and perfect scores from across the industry. A sequel to 1000000, Touch Arcade stated that You Must Build A Boat "makes the original game feel like a demo. It’s absurdly fun and nearly impossible to put down." What earns it a spot worthy of highlighting on The Best Games Period as an Honorable Mention? Listen and learn. Outro music: Undertale 'Make Your Life Hell' by LongBoxofChocolate (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03424) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes (consider leaving a review!). A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! You can also follow the show on Twitter: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  20. A new and interesting take on augmented reality games, Mr. Robot:1.51exfiltratiOn allows players to interact with the world of Mr. Robot via a messaging app for iOS and Android. The game takes place in real time over the course of a week as players talk with members of the underground hacker group, fsociety. In the game, players will use the E Corp messaging app to interact with original characters and characters from the USA show with the goal of recovering data vital to uncovering E Corp's plans. To create 1.51exfiltratiOn, Telltale Games teamed up with Night School Studio, the developer behind the recently released and well-received Oxenfree. The game through messaging app idea presented some very unique challenges, especially when extended over the course of a week in real-time. Players interact with the game by using the E Corp app and using its various features or selecting one of several responses to incoming messages to see how all of it plays out. While that not seem as fleshed out as allowing players to write their own messages, the hurdles of predicting text responses needed to be narrowed down. "Night School Studio is one of the most promising small developers in the industry, and seeing Telltale alumnus and writer Adam Hines writing alongside the team at UCP (Universal Cable Productions) and USA on an interactive story with our partners at NBCUniversal makes us proud to present this to MR. ROBOT and Telltale fans everywhere," said Steve Allison, the senior vice president of publishing at Telltale Games. "There's a distinct Telltale style to all of the character interactions that our fans will find familiar, and fans of the show will be engrossed all through the night as they race to help fsociety pull off the unthinkable." Mr. Robot:1.51exfiltratiOn is available now for iOS and Android devices.
  21. A new and interesting take on augmented reality games, Mr. Robot:1.51exfiltratiOn allows players to interact with the world of Mr. Robot via a messaging app for iOS and Android. The game takes place in real time over the course of a week as players talk with members of the underground hacker group, fsociety. In the game, players will use the E Corp messaging app to interact with original characters and characters from the USA show with the goal of recovering data vital to uncovering E Corp's plans. To create 1.51exfiltratiOn, Telltale Games teamed up with Night School Studio, the developer behind the recently released and well-received Oxenfree. The game through messaging app idea presented some very unique challenges, especially when extended over the course of a week in real-time. Players interact with the game by using the E Corp app and using its various features or selecting one of several responses to incoming messages to see how all of it plays out. While that not seem as fleshed out as allowing players to write their own messages, the hurdles of predicting text responses needed to be narrowed down. "Night School Studio is one of the most promising small developers in the industry, and seeing Telltale alumnus and writer Adam Hines writing alongside the team at UCP (Universal Cable Productions) and USA on an interactive story with our partners at NBCUniversal makes us proud to present this to MR. ROBOT and Telltale fans everywhere," said Steve Allison, the senior vice president of publishing at Telltale Games. "There's a distinct Telltale style to all of the character interactions that our fans will find familiar, and fans of the show will be engrossed all through the night as they race to help fsociety pull off the unthinkable." Mr. Robot:1.51exfiltratiOn is available now for iOS and Android devices. View full article
  22. Pokémon Go has been sweeping the world for the past several days. To say that the game, which allows players to search out Pokémon in the real world, capture them, and fight over gyms, has created a social craze would be a bit of an understatement Going to any centrally located Pokéstop or gym usually reveals dozens of small groups of players searching for Pokémon or vying for gym control. A certain spirit of camaraderie exists between players of the the mobile game, sheepish grins and conversation exchanged between those who bump into one another in public. A great deal of enjoyment and fun has been had with the app already with more to be had in the future. That being said, Pokémon Go has had a number of problems during its launch that developer Niantic could improve upon. Chief among them has been server stability keeping players from logging in to the app, preventing the app from refreshing Pokémon in the area, and cancelling the capture of Pokémon (c'mon, I was just about to catch that wily Ghastly). Players have also been noticing certain improvements that could be made with app compatibility, safety, and respect for certain areas. This has led to a number of petitions being filed for Niantic to improve or change Pokémon Go. The largest of these petitions asks for Pokémon Go to be made compatible with Windows 10 and Windows 10 mobile, which is currently sitting at over 43,000 signatures. The next largest seems to be the petition with almost 35,000 signatures asking for the app to run on phones that use Intel processors. Several other petitions exist that ask for a Windows phone compatible version of Pokémon Go. Regarding safety concerns, players have begun a petition for a feature that limits Pokémon Go while driving in order to protect against distracted driving, which is an actual problem. The petition's creator, Charles A, envisions an update for the app, "that can detect increased fast movement via the GPS on a user's phone and disabling certain features in the game." He also adds that, "the ability to disable this [...] if there happens to be passengers playing Pokemon Go and not the one operating the motor vehicle to prevent frustration should also be considered." One of the final petitions asks for Niantic to remove Pokéstops and gyms from cemeteries. For obvious reasons, having crowds of people wandering in and around cemeteries playing a game can be disruptive to those who want to pay respect to their deceased loved ones. One might think to themselves, "Oh, that's a silly thing to start a petition over. Of course no one would go into a cemetery and disrupt a funeral or the mourning of other people." Except that reading the comments on the petition clearly indicates that there are a lot of people who could care less. One of the signatures comes from Cheryl Tyiska, the manager of a cemetery in Washington D.C., who states that, "Pokémon Go players have disrupted funeral processions and put themselves in potentially dangerous situations with regards to the roads."
  23. Pokémon Go has been sweeping the world for the past several days. To say that the game, which allows players to search out Pokémon in the real world, capture them, and fight over gyms, has created a social craze would be a bit of an understatement Going to any centrally located Pokéstop or gym usually reveals dozens of small groups of players searching for Pokémon or vying for gym control. A certain spirit of camaraderie exists between players of the the mobile game, sheepish grins and conversation exchanged between those who bump into one another in public. A great deal of enjoyment and fun has been had with the app already with more to be had in the future. That being said, Pokémon Go has had a number of problems during its launch that developer Niantic could improve upon. Chief among them has been server stability keeping players from logging in to the app, preventing the app from refreshing Pokémon in the area, and cancelling the capture of Pokémon (c'mon, I was just about to catch that wily Ghastly). Players have also been noticing certain improvements that could be made with app compatibility, safety, and respect for certain areas. This has led to a number of petitions being filed for Niantic to improve or change Pokémon Go. The largest of these petitions asks for Pokémon Go to be made compatible with Windows 10 and Windows 10 mobile, which is currently sitting at over 43,000 signatures. The next largest seems to be the petition with almost 35,000 signatures asking for the app to run on phones that use Intel processors. Several other petitions exist that ask for a Windows phone compatible version of Pokémon Go. Regarding safety concerns, players have begun a petition for a feature that limits Pokémon Go while driving in order to protect against distracted driving, which is an actual problem. The petition's creator, Charles A, envisions an update for the app, "that can detect increased fast movement via the GPS on a user's phone and disabling certain features in the game." He also adds that, "the ability to disable this [...] if there happens to be passengers playing Pokemon Go and not the one operating the motor vehicle to prevent frustration should also be considered." One of the final petitions asks for Niantic to remove Pokéstops and gyms from cemeteries. For obvious reasons, having crowds of people wandering in and around cemeteries playing a game can be disruptive to those who want to pay respect to their deceased loved ones. One might think to themselves, "Oh, that's a silly thing to start a petition over. Of course no one would go into a cemetery and disrupt a funeral or the mourning of other people." Except that reading the comments on the petition clearly indicates that there are a lot of people who could care less. One of the signatures comes from Cheryl Tyiska, the manager of a cemetery in Washington D.C., who states that, "Pokémon Go players have disrupted funeral processions and put themselves in potentially dangerous situations with regards to the roads." View full article
  24. Hey Extra Life Community - We have some exciting news to share! In an effort to help make fundraising more fun, more accessible and ultimately easier, we’ve added two new applications to the Extra Life experience. Now you can fundraise through Facebook or on the go from your phone! Extra Life Facebook App Fundraising has never been quicker or easier than with the new Extra Life Facebook App. It installs in just a few seconds and allows you to opt-in to automatic status updates, upload Extra Life profile and cover pictures and ask your entire Facebook network for donations in just a few clicks. To start fundraising through the Extra Life Facebook App, login to to your Extra Life account, and click "Fundraise with Facebook" in the participant dashboard. Extra Life Mobile App Manage and share your Extra Life experience on the go with our new Extra Life mobile app. This free app lets you fundraise and connect with others through SMS, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn & Email. You can update your Extra Life page and check your fundraising progress all from the palm of your hand. Download the app here: iPhone | Android We’ve also spent the last couple of months improving the mobile experience on the Extra Life website so give the new apps a try. We want to hear what you think so send any feedback and ideas to community@extra-life.org or comment below and let us know! For The Kids, Mike Kinney Team Extra Life Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals View full article
  25. Telltale concludes its Borderlands series next week and has one more trailer up their sleeves to build anticipation. The developer teases an unprecedented amount of explosions, revelations, and climactic tension as the cast of characters races for the riches of a vault with a nearly assembled key. Tales from the Borderlands Episode Five - The Vault of the Traveler releases on October 20 for PC, PlayStation 4, and PlayStation 3; October 21 for Xbox One and Xbox 360; and October 22 for iOS and Android.