Jack Gardner

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  1. Feature: Review: Rime

    Rime begins with stormy seas, a red scrap of cloth buffeted by the wind whipping through the air, and a young boy washed up on the shores of an island covered in the ruins of a once mighty civilization. Without a word, players assume control of this child and help him to move through this world full of spirits, magic, and ancient technology. In fact, Rime contains not one line of dialogue – Tequila Works communicate their entire narrative through breathtaking visuals and an absolutely astounding score by David Garcia Diaz. Bright colors swirl across the landscape making everything feel alive and vibrant. The use of these popping colors make it all the more potent when the adventure inevitably descends into darkness and mystery. Majestic soundscapes weave an element of vanished magic into the game, as if the music itself was always grasping to reclaim just a little more of the lost glory the island’s ruined spires. The world of Rime is one that has been afflicted by something terrible. Something so destructive that it has shattered the very fabric of the world. This loss permeates every facet of the adventure. Weeping statues and grasping, shade-filled halls lay in the world’s forgotten corners. For every bright, shining moment in the sun, there is one in which the shadows envelop the red-caped protagonist. That ever-present conflict between light and dark? That escalating tension and deepening mystery? Those are the building blocks of every great adventure. The entire presentation readily draws comparisons to the work of Studio Ghibli, a similarity noted in other reviews of Rime. While I think the observation surprisingly apt for the audio-visual elements, Ghibli tends to make their work aimed squarely at children – Rime takes aim at an older crowd. While it can certainly be enjoyed by younger gamers, the themes and payoff will affect more seasoned players on a deeper level. The seemingly overplayed narrative carries an edge that cuts to the bone with loss and love. <a data-cke-saved-href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack" href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack">RiME (Deluxe Soundtrack) by David García Díaz</a> Each step of Rime’s journey presents an obstacle to be overcome, puzzles to be solved, or enemies to defeat. However, Rime isn’t about any one of those aspects on their own. There are some platforming sections, but it isn’t a platformer. Problems beg for solutions, but Rime isn’t a puzzle game. While sometimes enemies do make an appearance, few would ever describe Rime as a game about combat. Instead, Rime places its focus squarely on maintaining a sense of adventure and subtle storytelling. That emphasis on adventure smooths the gameplay experience. Few will need to grab a strategy guide or watch a walkthrough in order to find the solution to a puzzle. The platforming demands little in the way of reflexes. Combat is about as far from hack and slash as one can get; it’s more of a larger, faster puzzle than anything else. One might wonder how Rime manages to remain compelling with its gameplay when enjoyment doesn’t come from reflexive skill. The narrative hook of learning what happened to the island and our protagonist pulls the player relentlessly forward. Lacking any dialogue to explain the situation or internal monologue to learn what kind of a person the protagonist might be, all we learn about him is from what we can see during gameplay – how he chooses to interact with the world. Perhaps most informative interaction comes from the child’s ability to shout, which causes different interactions with objects throughout the world. Sometimes that shout is a call; other times it becomes a humming sing-song of a half remembered song; and as danger mounts it becomes a whimper. That one interaction can show our protagonist cry, laugh, and grieve. But through all those emotions, he continues to move through the world on his journey, leaving much up to the player’s interpretation. Rime certainly doesn’t overstay its welcome. A relatively focused playthrough can make it from beginning to end in about four hours. Tequila Works doesn’t reuse puzzles – though occasionally similar puzzles reappear as character-building moments. The short length works in Rime’s favor and lends itself to multiple playthroughs. Players who love to scour every inch of their game worlds will find a nice challenge in discovering all the knickknacks hidden away (which all serve a narrative purpose as well). There are certain tropes that fledgling story writers are taught to avoid at all costs: Never open a scene with an alarm clock going off; do not include a gunshot followed by a cut to black; and never ever end with the dreaded phrase, “it was all a dream.” The overuse of these storytelling devices drill them into the public consciousness and rendering them clichés. However – and this is one of storytelling’s biggest secrets - a story can use a cliché, provided that it works. For example, a house full of alarm clocks fills the opening of Back to the Future and that works because the movie revolves around our human relationship with time. The film makes appropriate use of the device in a refreshing way - it’s played as a joke that reinforces the central premise of the film - turning it from a cliché back into a trope, and tropes are just tools in a storyteller’s toolbox. In a gaming landscape filled to bursting with indies, many might take a look at Rime and imagine it to be the latest in a long line of Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw dubbed Small Child, Scary World (SCSW) games. Limbo, Ico, Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons, Braid, these games all take similar forms and tackle themes of being alone in an unknowable world that threatens danger at every turn. The storytelling trope of SCSW has certainly proven to be effective, but its overuse threatens to plunge into cliché territory. And while Rime certainly does fit into the same category, it turns the very concept on its head in a way that works beautifully. Conclusion: Some people might have certain expectations as to what Rime will be – Set those expectations aside and to go into it blind. While Rime certainly might seem to have the trappings of indie gaming tropes that are coming closer to cliché, Tequila Works subverts those expectations in a masterful fashion. 2017 has been a fantastic year for video games – so many quality titles, both big and small, have released. It is a testament to Rime’s quality that it stands as the best thing I have played so far amid the AAA giants that have flexed their gaming muscle over the past several months. It conjures up a mythical adventure that sweeps players up in its majesty. Rime expertly plays with emotion like a master pianist would compose a captivating solo. Rime ends on a haunting final note that doesn’t deliver the empowering resolution many might desire, but it leaves the player with something much better: A powerful artistic statement about how beautiful and terrible and lovely and difficult life can be – and how we can all recover from the worst tragedies and find peace. Rime is now available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC - a Switch version is scheduled to release later this year View full article
  2. Review: Rime

    Rime begins with stormy seas, a red scrap of cloth buffeted by the wind whipping through the air, and a young boy washed up on the shores of an island covered in the ruins of a once mighty civilization. Without a word, players assume control of this child and help him to move through this world full of spirits, magic, and ancient technology. In fact, Rime contains not one line of dialogue – Tequila Works communicate their entire narrative through breathtaking visuals and an absolutely astounding score by David Garcia Diaz. Bright colors swirl across the landscape making everything feel alive and vibrant. The use of these popping colors make it all the more potent when the adventure inevitably descends into darkness and mystery. Majestic soundscapes weave an element of vanished magic into the game, as if the music itself was always grasping to reclaim just a little more of the lost glory the island’s ruined spires. The world of Rime is one that has been afflicted by something terrible. Something so destructive that it has shattered the very fabric of the world. This loss permeates every facet of the adventure. Weeping statues and grasping, shade-filled halls lay in the world’s forgotten corners. For every bright, shining moment in the sun, there is one in which the shadows envelop the red-caped protagonist. That ever-present conflict between light and dark? That escalating tension and deepening mystery? Those are the building blocks of every great adventure. The entire presentation readily draws comparisons to the work of Studio Ghibli, a similarity noted in other reviews of Rime. While I think the observation surprisingly apt for the audio-visual elements, Ghibli tends to make their work aimed squarely at children – Rime takes aim at an older crowd. While it can certainly be enjoyed by younger gamers, the themes and payoff will affect more seasoned players on a deeper level. The seemingly overplayed narrative carries an edge that cuts to the bone with loss and love. <a data-cke-saved-href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack" href="http://music.greybox.com/album/rime-deluxe-soundtrack">RiME (Deluxe Soundtrack) by David García Díaz</a> Each step of Rime’s journey presents an obstacle to be overcome, puzzles to be solved, or enemies to defeat. However, Rime isn’t about any one of those aspects on their own. There are some platforming sections, but it isn’t a platformer. Problems beg for solutions, but Rime isn’t a puzzle game. While sometimes enemies do make an appearance, few would ever describe Rime as a game about combat. Instead, Rime places its focus squarely on maintaining a sense of adventure and subtle storytelling. That emphasis on adventure smooths the gameplay experience. Few will need to grab a strategy guide or watch a walkthrough in order to find the solution to a puzzle. The platforming demands little in the way of reflexes. Combat is about as far from hack and slash as one can get; it’s more of a larger, faster puzzle than anything else. One might wonder how Rime manages to remain compelling with its gameplay when enjoyment doesn’t come from reflexive skill. The narrative hook of learning what happened to the island and our protagonist pulls the player relentlessly forward. Lacking any dialogue to explain the situation or internal monologue to learn what kind of a person the protagonist might be, all we learn about him is from what we can see during gameplay – how he chooses to interact with the world. Perhaps most informative interaction comes from the child’s ability to shout, which causes different interactions with objects throughout the world. Sometimes that shout is a call; other times it becomes a humming sing-song of a half remembered song; and as danger mounts it becomes a whimper. That one interaction can show our protagonist cry, laugh, and grieve. But through all those emotions, he continues to move through the world on his journey, leaving much up to the player’s interpretation. Rime certainly doesn’t overstay its welcome. A relatively focused playthrough can make it from beginning to end in about four hours. Tequila Works doesn’t reuse puzzles – though occasionally similar puzzles reappear as character-building moments. The short length works in Rime’s favor and lends itself to multiple playthroughs. Players who love to scour every inch of their game worlds will find a nice challenge in discovering all the knickknacks hidden away (which all serve a narrative purpose as well). There are certain tropes that fledgling story writers are taught to avoid at all costs: Never open a scene with an alarm clock going off; do not include a gunshot followed by a cut to black; and never ever end with the dreaded phrase, “it was all a dream.” The overuse of these storytelling devices drill them into the public consciousness and rendering them clichés. However – and this is one of storytelling’s biggest secrets - a story can use a cliché, provided that it works. For example, a house full of alarm clocks fills the opening of Back to the Future and that works because the movie revolves around our human relationship with time. The film makes appropriate use of the device in a refreshing way - it’s played as a joke that reinforces the central premise of the film - turning it from a cliché back into a trope, and tropes are just tools in a storyteller’s toolbox. In a gaming landscape filled to bursting with indies, many might take a look at Rime and imagine it to be the latest in a long line of Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw dubbed Small Child, Scary World (SCSW) games. Limbo, Ico, Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons, Braid, these games all take similar forms and tackle themes of being alone in an unknowable world that threatens danger at every turn. The storytelling trope of SCSW has certainly proven to be effective, but its overuse threatens to plunge into cliché territory. And while Rime certainly does fit into the same category, it turns the very concept on its head in a way that works beautifully. Conclusion: Some people might have certain expectations as to what Rime will be – Set those expectations aside and to go into it blind. While Rime certainly might seem to have the trappings of indie gaming tropes that are coming closer to cliché, Tequila Works subverts those expectations in a masterful fashion. 2017 has been a fantastic year for video games – so many quality titles, both big and small, have released. It is a testament to Rime’s quality that it stands as the best thing I have played so far amid the AAA giants that have flexed their gaming muscle over the past several months. It conjures up a mythical adventure that sweeps players up in its majesty. Rime expertly plays with emotion like a master pianist would compose a captivating solo. Rime ends on a haunting final note that doesn’t deliver the empowering resolution many might desire, but it leaves the player with something much better: A powerful artistic statement about how beautiful and terrible and lovely and difficult life can be – and how we can all recover from the worst tragedies and find peace. Rime is now available on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC - a Switch version is scheduled to release later this year
  3. Disco Bear Will Dance into Your Heart

    Laughter filled a small corner of the crowded convention space. In the middle of the largest show aimed at putting gaming's biggest and flashiest on full display, laughter is often in short supply. Excitement? Oh, you better believe it! Smiles? All over the place. Cheers? Constantly ringing out. But laughter is a rarer thing. So when I heard laughter from around a tiny booth tucked away on the show floor of E3 2017, I knew I had to investigate. And that's when I found it - a game so pure and good that it improved my life with its simple existence. Disco Bear. Players control the titular disco bear, a polar bear who loves to dance. After suffering an embarrassing, traumatic incident in 1977, Bear leaves the dance floor for good. Five years later, he comes out of retirement to bust a move one last time to save the local roller skating rink. The characters are all still images of animals in various poses of varying ridiculousness. The gameplay isn't deep, merely using the arrow keys to boogie to the best of the player's ability. The idea appears simple on paper, but the humorous execution leaves players smirking and laughing along with the comedic narrative. Disco Bear isn't the most complex game ever created, but it is certainly an incredibly effective game at achieving its goals. While I watched people play it in that E3 booth, everyone was smirking and chuckling as they wiggled their way through Disco Bear's adventure. I can honestly say that my life is better for having played it, and that's not something that can be said for a lot of games that I've played throughout my life. I had an opportunity to talk with Katie Pustolski, a graduate student at the University of Southern California and one of the co-creators of Disco Bear. Here's what I learned. Could you tell me a little about Disco Bear? I don't think I've ever seen anything quite like it. Katie Pustolski: [Brian Handy and I,] we made this within a course of 15 weeks. The project is a heartfelt story about a bear being asked to dance again. It's an interactive narrative, it's very simple controls; it's only arrow keys, and there's no objective, no challenge, it's really just kind of a cute, silly experience. One of our experience goals was actually just to make people laugh, and smile, and it seems to be working really well! We've been getting a lot of positive feedback. The best thing about showing this game is seeing everybody's reactions. Certain people react differently, but there are certain points within the story where most people just burst out into laughter, or it's so unexpected--they weren't expecting the girl in the beginning to die. It's dark humor. So how did you actually go about and get pictures of the animals? Did you get those online? Pustolski: Yes. A lot of searching online; we tried our best to find images under creative commons licenses so that we can actually use them, cut them out and whatnot. Actually, during the credits, we have this giant wall of text that credits to all the pictures that we found online, and we did the same with sounds. We also have a music composer on the project who made the music, who is not here, but he is Bill Piyatut. He is not at the table at the moment, but yeah, other than that, we had Eileen Mary O'Connell who is a comedic consultant, so we asked her about comedy, and how do we try to make this funny, what can we do better? How did you decide on "Disco Bear"? That seems like a very specific thing, or alternatively, a very random thing. Pustolski: Oh yeah, so random. So during the ideation phase, when Brian and I were brainstorming, we knew we wanted to do something funny. Something with comedy, and spoil the space because this is a space within gaming and interactive media that's not touched on a lot. We're fans of awkward physics games like Octodad, but we didn't really want to do awkward physics, we wanted to experiment with other forms. Other forms of awkwardness? Pustolski: Awkwardness, and something to get a really good reaction from the player that's silly and fun and makes people smile. A little bit whimsical in a way. And we found through prototyping that simple interaction, such as playing with the arrow keys, was enough to get people smiling and laughing at a bear just dancing on the screen. One of the inspirations for this project was Colin's Bear. I'm not sure if you're familiar with it? It's like this small video on YouTube, I believe it's around 10 years old, but don't quote me on that because I'm not sure when it came out. This student made an animation project, but didn't feel like he got a lot out of his animation class, so he fulfilled all the requirements for the project within 20 or so seconds with this awkward dancing bear [laughs] and at the end it says 'Thanks for nothing.' That was one of the inspirations, and then of course, it just went from there, from that prototype of a dancing bear and simple interactions, expanded it, and it became what it is today. A lot of people approach video games and they have these grand visions of castles in the sky and giant wars and sweeping stories. So what made you focus on a dancing bear rather than a bigger, more hyperbolic experience? Pustolski: Brian and I worked on smaller projects together in the past for school, and we found that we have very similar humor. And again, during the ideation phase, we were trying to figure out what are we doing for this project? Ok, how about comedy? Ok, we we have a similar sense of humor, let's give it a go, let's try something in this area, because again, it's not touched on much. we wanted to experiment a little bit. So the base goal, just make people smile, make people laugh. Pustolski: I really like making people laugh and smile, so it just fit. How did you wind up at E3 with this game? Pustolski: It was actually Brian's idea to submit to IndieCade and we submitted it, and I guess they did some kind of judging and it was picked! And suddenly, we were here! And we're showing at E3, and this is great because this is my first time showing a game at a show or a festival; I'm a newbie at this. But Brian helped show a different project last year so he did something like this last year; he has more experience showing than I do. He's very good at showing games to people, and I'm still working on that. What is it like? Because not everyone gets to show off a game at E3. I'm sure there are good parts, and probably not so great parts. Pustolski: Good parts is networking with people, and obviously seeing people's reactions to the game. So far we've gotten a lot of positive feedback, positive responses and that's fantastic. Bad part, it's very tiring! And I go home, and my feet feel like they're on fire, but it's totally worth it. Would you ever considered making an expanded retail version of Disco Bear? Pustolski: We haven't discussed anything beyond what we already have, but this next year, Brian and I have to work on our thesis projects. Disco Bear can't be your thesis project!? Pustolski: Well, it doesn't count, because we have a full program, and a full year of working on our thesis. And it's individual too. So Brian has his own project he'll be working on, and I have my own project. How can people play Disco Bear? Is it out? Pustolski: Ah! Yes! It is out online right now at discobeargame.com. It is based in the browser. It's not mobile, it's only desktop/laptop because you need the arrow keys to play, but otherwise it's free, and you can go online right now and play it. --- Go out and play Disco Bear - it will at the very least improve your day with a ridiculous dancing bear.
  4. Laughter filled a small corner of the crowded convention space. In the middle of the largest show aimed at putting gaming's biggest and flashiest on full display, laughter is often in short supply. Excitement? Oh, you better believe it! Smiles? All over the place. Cheers? Constantly ringing out. But laughter is a rarer thing. So when I heard laughter from around a tiny booth tucked away on the show floor of E3 2017, I knew I had to investigate. And that's when I found it - a game so pure and good that it improved my life with its simple existence. Disco Bear. Players control the titular disco bear, a polar bear who loves to dance. After suffering an embarrassing, traumatic incident in 1977, Bear leaves the dance floor for good. Five years later, he comes out of retirement to bust a move one last time to save the local roller skating rink. The characters are all still images of animals in various poses of varying ridiculousness. The gameplay isn't deep, merely using the arrow keys to boogie to the best of the player's ability. The idea appears simple on paper, but the humorous execution leaves players smirking and laughing along with the comedic narrative. Disco Bear isn't the most complex game ever created, but it is certainly an incredibly effective game at achieving its goals. While I watched people play it in that E3 booth, everyone was smirking and chuckling as they wiggled their way through Disco Bear's adventure. I can honestly say that my life is better for having played it, and that's not something that can be said for a lot of games that I've played throughout my life. I had an opportunity to talk with Katie Pustolski, a graduate student at the University of Southern California and one of the co-creators of Disco Bear. Here's what I learned. Could you tell me a little about Disco Bear? I don't think I've ever seen anything quite like it. Katie Pustolski: [Brian Handy and I,] we made this within a course of 15 weeks. The project is a heartfelt story about a bear being asked to dance again. It's an interactive narrative, it's very simple controls; it's only arrow keys, and there's no objective, no challenge, it's really just kind of a cute, silly experience. One of our experience goals was actually just to make people laugh, and smile, and it seems to be working really well! We've been getting a lot of positive feedback. The best thing about showing this game is seeing everybody's reactions. Certain people react differently, but there are certain points within the story where most people just burst out into laughter, or it's so unexpected--they weren't expecting the girl in the beginning to die. It's dark humor. So how did you actually go about and get pictures of the animals? Did you get those online? Pustolski: Yes. A lot of searching online; we tried our best to find images under creative commons licenses so that we can actually use them, cut them out and whatnot. Actually, during the credits, we have this giant wall of text that credits to all the pictures that we found online, and we did the same with sounds. We also have a music composer on the project who made the music, who is not here, but he is Bill Piyatut. He is not at the table at the moment, but yeah, other than that, we had Eileen Mary O'Connell who is a comedic consultant, so we asked her about comedy, and how do we try to make this funny, what can we do better? How did you decide on "Disco Bear"? That seems like a very specific thing, or alternatively, a very random thing. Pustolski: Oh yeah, so random. So during the ideation phase, when Brian and I were brainstorming, we knew we wanted to do something funny. Something with comedy, and spoil the space because this is a space within gaming and interactive media that's not touched on a lot. We're fans of awkward physics games like Octodad, but we didn't really want to do awkward physics, we wanted to experiment with other forms. Other forms of awkwardness? Pustolski: Awkwardness, and something to get a really good reaction from the player that's silly and fun and makes people smile. A little bit whimsical in a way. And we found through prototyping that simple interaction, such as playing with the arrow keys, was enough to get people smiling and laughing at a bear just dancing on the screen. One of the inspirations for this project was Colin's Bear. I'm not sure if you're familiar with it? It's like this small video on YouTube, I believe it's around 10 years old, but don't quote me on that because I'm not sure when it came out. This student made an animation project, but didn't feel like he got a lot out of his animation class, so he fulfilled all the requirements for the project within 20 or so seconds with this awkward dancing bear [laughs] and at the end it says 'Thanks for nothing.' That was one of the inspirations, and then of course, it just went from there, from that prototype of a dancing bear and simple interactions, expanded it, and it became what it is today. A lot of people approach video games and they have these grand visions of castles in the sky and giant wars and sweeping stories. So what made you focus on a dancing bear rather than a bigger, more hyperbolic experience? Pustolski: Brian and I worked on smaller projects together in the past for school, and we found that we have very similar humor. And again, during the ideation phase, we were trying to figure out what are we doing for this project? Ok, how about comedy? Ok, we we have a similar sense of humor, let's give it a go, let's try something in this area, because again, it's not touched on much. we wanted to experiment a little bit. So the base goal, just make people smile, make people laugh. Pustolski: I really like making people laugh and smile, so it just fit. How did you wind up at E3 with this game? Pustolski: It was actually Brian's idea to submit to IndieCade and we submitted it, and I guess they did some kind of judging and it was picked! And suddenly, we were here! And we're showing at E3, and this is great because this is my first time showing a game at a show or a festival; I'm a newbie at this. But Brian helped show a different project last year so he did something like this last year; he has more experience showing than I do. He's very good at showing games to people, and I'm still working on that. What is it like? Because not everyone gets to show off a game at E3. I'm sure there are good parts, and probably not so great parts. Pustolski: Good parts is networking with people, and obviously seeing people's reactions to the game. So far we've gotten a lot of positive feedback, positive responses and that's fantastic. Bad part, it's very tiring! And I go home, and my feet feel like they're on fire, but it's totally worth it. Would you ever considered making an expanded retail version of Disco Bear? Pustolski: We haven't discussed anything beyond what we already have, but this next year, Brian and I have to work on our thesis projects. Disco Bear can't be your thesis project!? Pustolski: Well, it doesn't count, because we have a full program, and a full year of working on our thesis. And it's individual too. So Brian has his own project he'll be working on, and I have my own project. How can people play Disco Bear? Is it out? Pustolski: Ah! Yes! It is out online right now at discobeargame.com. It is based in the browser. It's not mobile, it's only desktop/laptop because you need the arrow keys to play, but otherwise it's free, and you can go online right now and play it. --- Go out and play Disco Bear - it will at the very least improve your day with a ridiculous dancing bear. View full article
  5. Earlier this year Atari announced that they were in the process of developing a new console for the first time in decades. There was a 20-second teaser that showed off vague contours of the console before fading into a logo for the classic gaming giant. Now we finally have a good look at the console and know a bit about what it will be able to do. Two different versions of the console will be available when it launches: A retro-inspired wood panel design and a more modern red and black option. Lights indicating the positions of various cable and card ports shine through the console's materials along with the company's logo. The Ataribox console will sport an SD card reader, an HDMI port, and four USB ports. Atari has stated that Ataribox will be supporting classic Atari games as well as more "current content." They did not elaborate as to what that more current content might be, but the concept of Atari pulling an NES Classic-type console that can also download and play more modern titles certainly comes across as intriguing. The company also did not clarify if the console would be limited to Atari titles, if there might be third party support, or if the console might be a more open-source device. Atari made all of this public in emails to their community stating that their goal with this Ataribox is “to create something new, that stays true to our heritage, while appealing to both old and new fans of Atari.” They seem to know that people want to know more about the device, so their email went on to clarify that, “We know you are hungry for more details; on specs, games, pricing, timing. We’re not teasing you intentionally; we want to get this right, so we’ve opted to share things step by step as we bring this to life, and to listen closely to the Atari community feedback as we do so.” What do you think? Are we ready for a new Atari console? Is there space in the market for one to succeed?
  6. Earlier this year Atari announced that they were in the process of developing a new console for the first time in decades. There was a 20-second teaser that showed off vague contours of the console before fading into a logo for the classic gaming giant. Now we finally have a good look at the console and know a bit about what it will be able to do. Two different versions of the console will be available when it launches: A retro-inspired wood panel design and a more modern red and black option. Lights indicating the positions of various cable and card ports shine through the console's materials along with the company's logo. The Ataribox console will sport an SD card reader, an HDMI port, and four USB ports. Atari has stated that Ataribox will be supporting classic Atari games as well as more "current content." They did not elaborate as to what that more current content might be, but the concept of Atari pulling an NES Classic-type console that can also download and play more modern titles certainly comes across as intriguing. The company also did not clarify if the console would be limited to Atari titles, if there might be third party support, or if the console might be a more open-source device. Atari made all of this public in emails to their community stating that their goal with this Ataribox is “to create something new, that stays true to our heritage, while appealing to both old and new fans of Atari.” They seem to know that people want to know more about the device, so their email went on to clarify that, “We know you are hungry for more details; on specs, games, pricing, timing. We’re not teasing you intentionally; we want to get this right, so we’ve opted to share things step by step as we bring this to life, and to listen closely to the Atari community feedback as we do so.” What do you think? Are we ready for a new Atari console? Is there space in the market for one to succeed? View full article
  7. This week our topic was a bit tricky - Mass Effect 3 released to critical praise in 2012 but also made a name for itself by being at the epicenter of one of the biggest fan backlashes in gaming history. In order to properly talk about the conclusion of the Mass Effect trilogy, we made the decision to split the podcast into two parts. In part one, we discuss everything but the DLCs and the ending. Next week we will return with another full episode dedicated to discussing the ending of Mass Effect 3 and the apocalyptic public response that it received. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Mass Effect 'Nova Siberia' by Big Giant Circles (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02036) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  8. This week our topic was a bit tricky - Mass Effect 3 released to critical praise in 2012 but also made a name for itself by being at the epicenter of one of the biggest fan backlashes in gaming history. In order to properly talk about the conclusion of the Mass Effect trilogy, we made the decision to split the podcast into two parts. In part one, we discuss everything but the DLCs and the ending. Next week we will return with another full episode dedicated to discussing the ending of Mass Effect 3 and the apocalyptic public response that it received. Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Mass Effect 'Nova Siberia' by Big Giant Circles (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02036) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  9. I've been spending a fair bit of time fighting on the massive, free-for-all battlefield of PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds. The Steam early access game has taken the indie world by storm since its release, garnering a playerbase of over 4 million in the handful of months since its March 2017 release onto early access. For those who haven't yet set foot into the battlegrounds, the concept is deceptively simple: Roughly 100 players are dropped from a cargo plane onto a sprawling island with cities, towns, and various types of terrain and then battle to be the last one standing. The game can be tackled solo, co-op, or in a three to four person squad. Players drop onto the island without any items or equipment aside from the clothing (or in some cases underwear) on their backs and must frantically scavenge for supplies while keeping an eye out for fellow scavengers. The island is, as mentioned before, massive. Even with 100 players, players find themselves facing long periods of silence, the occasional gunshot ringing out in the distance. In order to bring players together, the map will periodically flood everything outside of a white ring with blue energy, slowly killing everyone who doesn't make it to the safe zone. This white ring continues to collapse as the game progresses, forcing everyone into smaller and smaller spaces until the last player, or the last team, is standing. And winners? They get to feast upon delicious, delicious chicken. The message "WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER!" appears on screen to congratulate players on their victory - before booting everyone out of the match. I won my first chicken dinner alongside some trusty teammates just a few days ago. As the feeling of accomplishment swelled within me, I became curious about the lore of Battlegrounds. Why were all these people parachuting onto an island to battle to the death, day after day? How are the same player-created characters able to die, rise, and then die again? What is really going on? The various materials available online about PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds seem to have precisely nothing to do with the surrounding context of the events happening within the game. This lack of clarification could be explained with the old "it's just a game, don't think about it, too much" answer, but where's the fun in that? While pondering over the dreamlike quality of Battlegrounds' setting and internal game logic, I think I hit upon an explanation for the entire game: Valhalla. In Norse mythology, Valhalla was the golden hall where Odin and his Valkyries brought chosen warriors for their afterlife. Once there, those warriors would fight all day and then retire at night to drink, eat, and heal their wounds. They fought each day to hone their abilities and combat prowess to prepare for the coming end of the world when they would march forth from their otherworldly training ground to fight in the final battle alongside Odin. Why do I think that PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds is Valhalla? Let's look at the facts. Fact: There are no 100% night conditions in PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds. Fighting in the moonlight is not something that happens in Battlegrounds. Sure, there are maps with varied lighting conditions and even a rare version of the map that is played at sunset, but no outright nighttime versions of the island are playable. Why is this important? Because the night is when those who have gone to Valhalla feast and heal from the day's fighting! And who gets the finest portion of the feast? The day's winner in combat, of course! They eat to the tune of, "WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER!" Fact: The vast majority of player-characters rise from their mortal wounds to fight again. Now, true, this happens in a lot of multiplayer games. However, it is an important data point that each player character is the same character. This seems to fit with the first fact - we're not faceless killers, but people with names, styles, and personalities. Fact: The last authoritative text describing Valhalla was written in the 1200s. The authoritative sources on exactly what Valhalla is like come from ancient Norse poems and histories. The most useful of those sources comes in the form of Icelandic historian Snorri Sturluson who lived from 1179-1241. Valhalla was described as a golden hall thatched with the shields of heroes, spear shafts holding them aloft, and benches adorned with chainmail. You might notice that this bears no resemblance to anything seen in Battlegrounds. However, Valhalla being a heavenly realm - who is to say that over 800 years of advancement might not make the Valhalla of 1200 much different than the Valhalla of 2017? It seems to me warriors of today would keep pace with modern technology, so it stands to reason that they'd be magically transported to a cargo plane to drop onto a Soviet-esque island to do battle for the day before being whisked away for feasting and healing in the golden hall. Fact: Friendships and rivalries extended into the Valhallan afterlife. There are stories in the Norse Eddas of great heroes making their way to Valhalla only to encounter old allies and possibly forgotten enemies. In PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, I've gone into battle alongside numerous friends, but also encountered rivals who had killed me in the past. These smaller stories, the stories of minute to minute gameplay would constitute the conversation, laughter, and jokes told at night within Odin's hall. Many outlets have written about how Battlegrounds is a veritable factory of emergent stories friends share together. Fact: No one knows exactly why they are fighting on the island, they just know that they must fight or die. if you ask several people why people are fighting in PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds and you'll likely get several different answers. The only thing everything can agree on is that they are magically transported onto a small island, then into a cargo plane, and then trapped on a larger island until a magical blue energy field starts closing in - and if they don't survive to be the last person/group alive, they'll succumb to either the deadly blue energy or to the bullets of enemies. From all the hard, irrefutable evidence present in the game and the lack of information from the developers, PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds is definitely the mythological Norse hall of the slain, Valhalla. I rest my case. Do you have a theory that explains what's going on in PUBG? Share it in the comments and maybe we can all come up with an even better theory!
  10. I've been spending a fair bit of time fighting on the massive, free-for-all battlefield of PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds. The Steam early access game has taken the indie world by storm since its release, garnering a playerbase of over 4 million in the handful of months since its March 2017 release onto early access. For those who haven't yet set foot into the battlegrounds, the concept is deceptively simple: Roughly 100 players are dropped from a cargo plane onto a sprawling island with cities, towns, and various types of terrain and then battle to be the last one standing. The game can be tackled solo, co-op, or in a three to four person squad. Players drop onto the island without any items or equipment aside from the clothing (or in some cases underwear) on their backs and must frantically scavenge for supplies while keeping an eye out for fellow scavengers. The island is, as mentioned before, massive. Even with 100 players, players find themselves facing long periods of silence, the occasional gunshot ringing out in the distance. In order to bring players together, the map will periodically flood everything outside of a white ring with blue energy, slowly killing everyone who doesn't make it to the safe zone. This white ring continues to collapse as the game progresses, forcing everyone into smaller and smaller spaces until the last player, or the last team, is standing. And winners? They get to feast upon delicious, delicious chicken. The message "WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER!" appears on screen to congratulate players on their victory - before booting everyone out of the match. I won my first chicken dinner alongside some trusty teammates just a few days ago. As the feeling of accomplishment swelled within me, I became curious about the lore of Battlegrounds. Why were all these people parachuting onto an island to battle to the death, day after day? How are the same player-created characters able to die, rise, and then die again? What is really going on? The various materials available online about PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds seem to have precisely nothing to do with the surrounding context of the events happening within the game. This lack of clarification could be explained with the old "it's just a game, don't think about it, too much" answer, but where's the fun in that? While pondering over the dreamlike quality of Battlegrounds' setting and internal game logic, I think I hit upon an explanation for the entire game: Valhalla. In Norse mythology, Valhalla was the golden hall where Odin and his Valkyries brought chosen warriors for their afterlife. Once there, those warriors would fight all day and then retire at night to drink, eat, and heal their wounds. They fought each day to hone their abilities and combat prowess to prepare for the coming end of the world when they would march forth from their otherworldly training ground to fight in the final battle alongside Odin. Why do I think that PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds is Valhalla? Let's look at the facts. Fact: There are no 100% night conditions in PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds. Fighting in the moonlight is not something that happens in Battlegrounds. Sure, there are maps with varied lighting conditions and even a rare version of the map that is played at sunset, but no outright nighttime versions of the island are playable. Why is this important? Because the night is when those who have gone to Valhalla feast and heal from the day's fighting! And who gets the finest portion of the feast? The day's winner in combat, of course! They eat to the tune of, "WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER!" Fact: The vast majority of player-characters rise from their mortal wounds to fight again. Now, true, this happens in a lot of multiplayer games. However, it is an important data point that each player character is the same character. This seems to fit with the first fact - we're not faceless killers, but people with names, styles, and personalities. Fact: The last authoritative text describing Valhalla was written in the 1200s. The authoritative sources on exactly what Valhalla is like come from ancient Norse poems and histories. The most useful of those sources comes in the form of Icelandic historian Snorri Sturluson who lived from 1179-1241. Valhalla was described as a golden hall thatched with the shields of heroes, spear shafts holding them aloft, and benches adorned with chainmail. You might notice that this bears no resemblance to anything seen in Battlegrounds. However, Valhalla being a heavenly realm - who is to say that over 800 years of advancement might not make the Valhalla of 1200 much different than the Valhalla of 2017? It seems to me warriors of today would keep pace with modern technology, so it stands to reason that they'd be magically transported to a cargo plane to drop onto a Soviet-esque island to do battle for the day before being whisked away for feasting and healing in the golden hall. Fact: Friendships and rivalries extended into the Valhallan afterlife. There are stories in the Norse Eddas of great heroes making their way to Valhalla only to encounter old allies and possibly forgotten enemies. In PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds, I've gone into battle alongside numerous friends, but also encountered rivals who had killed me in the past. These smaller stories, the stories of minute to minute gameplay would constitute the conversation, laughter, and jokes told at night within Odin's hall. Many outlets have written about how Battlegrounds is a veritable factory of emergent stories friends share together. Fact: No one knows exactly why they are fighting on the island, they just know that they must fight or die. if you ask several people why people are fighting in PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds and you'll likely get several different answers. The only thing everything can agree on is that they are magically transported onto a small island, then into a cargo plane, and then trapped on a larger island until a magical blue energy field starts closing in - and if they don't survive to be the last person/group alive, they'll succumb to either the deadly blue energy or to the bullets of enemies. From all the hard, irrefutable evidence present in the game and the lack of information from the developers, PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds is definitely the mythological Norse hall of the slain, Valhalla. I rest my case. Do you have a theory that explains what's going on in PUBG? Share it in the comments and maybe we can all come up with an even better theory! View full article
  11. Satoru Iwata Has Passed

    We are all at a loss today. Satoru Iwata, the president of Nintendo, is no longer with us. Nintendo officially released notice of his death today, noting that the sudden passing of the 55-year-old executive was the result of complications during surgery to remove a bile duct tumor. There are a lot of quotes and stories being exchanged in the world of gaming today. Many of the quotes are snappy and concise. Many of the stories are great testaments to Iwata's humility and character. However, we are all at a loss. There are no quotes, no stories, that can replace the man. Satoru Iwata built many of our childhoods in a profound way. He created Balloon Fight and EarthBound. He helped design Mario, Kirby, and Zelda titles. Along with Masahiro Sakurai, Iwata constructed the prototype for Super Smash Bros. He worked in the trenches, developing and designing games into his 40s. Without Iwata, video games would be a dimmer medium. In an era where many have become cynical and disillusioned with video game companies and the familiar PR lines, Satoru Iwata stood out. Instead of going bigger and flashier with Nintendo press conferences, he took them smaller and more intimate, using technology to talk directly to each person who supported Nintendo. He opened up Nintendo to the public, a company that had fiercely guarded its secrets and privacy. He changed the way a staple of the video game industry talked with its fans. That's incredible. Satoru Iwata was the kind of man who was willing to leave the corporate office and spend weeks personally fixing bugs and looking over code to make sure Super Smash Bros. Melee released on time. As CEO, Iwata took a 50% pay cut to allow people at Nintendo to keep their jobs. Throughout his life, Satoru Iwata displayed impeccable decency, dedication, and joy. Those things shown through in his work, the games he poured his life into, the games we played and laughed and bonded over. How do you properly send off someone like that? How do you say goodbye? The man was more than a corporate suit, more than a meme, and more than a creator of idle pastimes. People formed friendships over the fun infused into his games. Kids grew up with childhoods that were that much happier because they had spent time with his work. I believe that his good labor made us all better people and that his death leaves a little hole in all of us. In truth, there is no proper way to say goodbye. The world is a poorer place without Iwata. His effort meant so much to so many and now he is gone. Satoru Iwata leaves behind a legacy filled with countless smiles and happy memories. Some of those smiles and memories are mine and that's why I find myself wishing so hard that I was writing a story about a new Iwata banana meme instead of an obituary. It hurts when we lose someone with a good heart and Satoru Iwata had one of the best. Thank you, Iwata-san. May God watch over you as you rest in peace. We'll keep smiling for you.
  12. Naughty Dog has always been a company that took risks, and there's certainly an argument to be made that Crash Bandicoot was one of the biggest risks that the company ever took. The project set out to overcome the main problems that plagued early 3D game design, create what they hoped might become an unofficial PlayStation mascot, and took a chance on Sony's new platform, the original PlayStation. The remastered Crash Bandicoot trilogy has become the best selling game of the year so far, so that begs the question: Is Crash Bandicoot one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Crash Bandicoot 'All for Wampa' by Rexy (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02414) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  13. Naughty Dog has always been a company that took risks, and there's certainly an argument to be made that Crash Bandicoot was one of the biggest risks that the company ever took. The project set out to overcome the main problems that plagued early 3D game design, create what they hoped might become an unofficial PlayStation mascot, and took a chance on Sony's new platform, the original PlayStation. The remastered Crash Bandicoot trilogy has become the best selling game of the year so far, so that begs the question: Is Crash Bandicoot one of the best games period? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: Crash Bandicoot 'All for Wampa' by Rexy (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR02414) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  14. Oblivion released in 2006 bringing a massive open-world geared toward a mainstream audience to PC and console gamers alike. Players were able to explore Cyrodiil, a fantasy land full of kings and gods while experiencing a myriad of stories ranging from becoming the greatest thief in the land to stopping a full-blown demonic invasion. Does Oblivion stand on its own as one of the best games period or is it overshadowed by the likes of Morrowind and Skyrim? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion 'Beyond the Imperial Prison' by HyperDuck SoundWorks (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03522) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  15. Oblivion released in 2006 bringing a massive open-world geared toward a mainstream audience to PC and console gamers alike. Players were able to explore Cyrodiil, a fantasy land full of kings and gods while experiencing a myriad of stories ranging from becoming the greatest thief in the land to stopping a full-blown demonic invasion. Does Oblivion stand on its own as one of the best games period or is it overshadowed by the likes of Morrowind and Skyrim? Each week we will be tackling a video game, old or new, that at least one of us believes deserves to stand as one of the greatest games of all time. We'll dive into its history, development, and gameplay, while trying to argue for or against the game of the week. Sometimes we will be in harmonious agreement, other times we might be fighting a bitter battle to the very end. However each episode shakes out, we hope that everyone who listens will find the show entertaining and informative. Outro music: The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion 'Beyond the Imperial Prison' by HyperDuck SoundWorks (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03522) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  16. I really find the split people seem to have between all of the Fallout games to be really interesting. Some swear by the originals. Others adore 3. Then there are the New Vegas-ites. I think that 4 will eventually garner one of the largest followings, but I think it will take some time.
  17. Dubbed a "completely new game" by the RPG developer/publisher, Antique Carnevale was unveiled to the public in a new trailer aimed at the Japanese market. What kind of a name is Antique Carnevale? What does it mean? No one knows! Very few details have been revealed about the real game that is really titled Antique Carnevale, quite possibly the most JRPG-ish title of all time. A Japanese language site has been set up that provides a few tantalizing details and promises more information in the coming weeks. The site currently contains information describing the game's prologue and a description of a character named Bernhard. Below you can find both of those sections as translated by Gematsu: Prologue Have you thought about the differences between “things” and “living things”? Or the differences between “dolls” and “people”? If you ask, people will easily answer as such: dolls are “not able to move on their own,” right? However, that is an invitation to the labyrinth. Is a person unable to move by their own will not a “doll”? Is a doll able to move by its own will not a “person”? The explorers who wander around in search of an exit will find themselves deeply lost… And then, one boy visits that labyrinth by himself… He will listen. To the cries left behind by the “people” that have decayed in the labyrinth. He will understand. The desires of the “dolls” captured in the labyrinth. To that young man who stands in the space between people and dolls… I pray. May the blessings of the people of origin be with him. Bernhard (voiced by Natsuki Hanae) The personification of the summons beast Wyvern. He regularly guards the town as the young commanding knight of the Valamion. He has a strong sense of justice, but hates rushing to conclusions, and is often censured by those around him. Under the orders of the president, he is currently searching for the strongest masters of the next generation. The Antique Carnevale site teases more information releases for characters on July 7, 10, 12, and 14. Square Enix plans to unveil additional information, likely platforms and release date/window, on July 18. What do you think about this new IP? From the brief trailer and the strangely subdued fanfare of the announcement it seems like this might be an IP headed to smartphones, 3DS, or Vita rather than a AAA release for consoles. Any theories as to what this game might be about from the cryptic information provided by the prologue description?
  18. Dubbed a "completely new game" by the RPG developer/publisher, Antique Carnevale was unveiled to the public in a new trailer aimed at the Japanese market. What kind of a name is Antique Carnevale? What does it mean? No one knows! Very few details have been revealed about the real game that is really titled Antique Carnevale, quite possibly the most JRPG-ish title of all time. A Japanese language site has been set up that provides a few tantalizing details and promises more information in the coming weeks. The site currently contains information describing the game's prologue and a description of a character named Bernhard. Below you can find both of those sections as translated by Gematsu: Prologue Have you thought about the differences between “things” and “living things”? Or the differences between “dolls” and “people”? If you ask, people will easily answer as such: dolls are “not able to move on their own,” right? However, that is an invitation to the labyrinth. Is a person unable to move by their own will not a “doll”? Is a doll able to move by its own will not a “person”? The explorers who wander around in search of an exit will find themselves deeply lost… And then, one boy visits that labyrinth by himself… He will listen. To the cries left behind by the “people” that have decayed in the labyrinth. He will understand. The desires of the “dolls” captured in the labyrinth. To that young man who stands in the space between people and dolls… I pray. May the blessings of the people of origin be with him. Bernhard (voiced by Natsuki Hanae) The personification of the summons beast Wyvern. He regularly guards the town as the young commanding knight of the Valamion. He has a strong sense of justice, but hates rushing to conclusions, and is often censured by those around him. Under the orders of the president, he is currently searching for the strongest masters of the next generation. The Antique Carnevale site teases more information releases for characters on July 7, 10, 12, and 14. Square Enix plans to unveil additional information, likely platforms and release date/window, on July 18. What do you think about this new IP? From the brief trailer and the strangely subdued fanfare of the announcement it seems like this might be an IP headed to smartphones, 3DS, or Vita rather than a AAA release for consoles. Any theories as to what this game might be about from the cryptic information provided by the prologue description? View full article
  19. Long ago in a time now forgotten by modernity, there existed a game. That game pitted mortals against unspeakable horrors from beyond the stars. At the time, many laughed at its premise and comical execution, but little did those who scoffed know that the developers of Earth Defense Force had read the signs and knew of the coming apocalypse. They knew that they would have a single chance and that just one game would be their warning to the world of the impending disaster. The year is now 2017 - the eve of the bug-pocalypse. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Sonic CD 'A World in Motion' by DusK (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03081) We also recorded our 66th episode - an E3 wrap-up that released last week, but never got posted here (sorry about that, family medical emergency!). You can listen to that below! What's an E3? Jeremy and Daniel explain! Outro music: Super Castlevania IV 'Selva Oscura' by Furilas, Jorito, and Tuberz McGee (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03540) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday
  20. Long ago in a time now forgotten by modernity, there existed a game. That game pitted mortals against unspeakable horrors from beyond the stars. At the time, many laughed at its premise and comical execution, but little did those who scoffed know that the developers of Earth Defense Force had read the signs and knew of the coming apocalypse. They knew that they would have a single chance and that just one game would be their warning to the world of the impending disaster. The year is now 2017 - the eve of the bug-pocalypse. With schedules being what they are, sometimes coordinating a full episode of The Best Games Period can be difficult. When we can't have a proper discussion, we will be breaking off to do these shorter mini-casts, Honorable Mentions, to talk about fringe games that we might not otherwise be able to talk about on a full episode. Outro music: Sonic CD 'A World in Motion' by DusK (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03081) We also recorded our 66th episode - an E3 wrap-up that released last week, but never got posted here (sorry about that, family medical emergency!). You can listen to that below! What's an E3? Jeremy and Daniel explain! Outro music: Super Castlevania IV 'Selva Oscura' by Furilas, Jorito, and Tuberz McGee (http://ocremix.org/remix/OCR03540) You can download or listen to the podcast over on Soundcloud, our hosting site, and iTunes. A YouTube version is (sometimes) available as well, so you can watch what we are talking about while we talk about it! If you want to have your opinion heard on air, share your opinion in the comments, follow the show on Twitter, and participate in the weekly polls: @BestGamesPeriod New episodes of The Best Games Period will be released every Monday View full article
  21. Extra Life at E3 2017: Day Five

    The second official day of E3 has come and gone (after a few unofficial days, that is)! We've been doing daily recaps of the action leading up to the show and we'll be doing the same for the show itself, so tune in to the Facebook Live broadcast or catch it later via other channels. You'll get a great rundown of what it is like to cover E3 along with the news of the day as told by the talented bunch of people we've collected to cover the year's biggest gaming trade show. Day five didn't have the major announcements, but instead we buckled down and saw the games. Super secret projects, major names, and indie games galore were found in droves at the show! Jack Gardner, Marcus Stewart, Naomi Lugo, and Aiden Strawhun cover the basic, need-to-know announcements from the day. Kick back, relax, and enjoy the show with us!
  22. The second official day of E3 has come and gone (after a few unofficial days, that is)! We've been doing daily recaps of the action leading up to the show and we'll be doing the same for the show itself, so tune in to the Facebook Live broadcast or catch it later via other channels. You'll get a great rundown of what it is like to cover E3 along with the news of the day as told by the talented bunch of people we've collected to cover the year's biggest gaming trade show. Day five didn't have the major announcements, but instead we buckled down and saw the games. Super secret projects, major names, and indie games galore were found in droves at the show! Jack Gardner, Marcus Stewart, Naomi Lugo, and Aiden Strawhun cover the basic, need-to-know announcements from the day. Kick back, relax, and enjoy the show with us! View full article
  23. Extra Life E3 2017 Daily Wrap-Up: Day 3

    Though E3 proper hasn't yet begun, the pre-E3 press conferences have! This year, we are going to be capping off each day with a podcast discussing the news of the day with the talented bunch of people we've collected to cover the year's biggest gaming trade show. Day three covered a lot of ground between Ubisoft and Sony. The two industry titans threw out some pretty exciting announcements, like a completely overhauled Shadow of the Colossus for the PS4 and confirmation that, yes, Beyond Good & Evil 2 exists. Jack Gardner, Marcus Stewart and Naomi Lugo cover the basic, need-to-know announcements from the day. Kick back, relax, and enjoy the show with us!
  24. Though E3 proper hasn't yet begun, the pre-E3 press conferences have! This year, we are going to be capping off each day with a podcast discussing the news of the day with the talented bunch of people we've collected to cover the year's biggest gaming trade show. Day three covered a lot of ground between Ubisoft and Sony. The two industry titans threw out some pretty exciting announcements, like a completely overhauled Shadow of the Colossus for the PS4 and confirmation that, yes, Beyond Good & Evil 2 exists. Jack Gardner, Marcus Stewart and Naomi Lugo cover the basic, need-to-know announcements from the day. Kick back, relax, and enjoy the show with us! View full article