Naomi N. Lugo

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About Naomi N. Lugo

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  • Birthday 06/10/1992

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    Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare

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    Minneapolis

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  1. First Person Shooters have a certain ability. They can raise our blood pressure, help us invent new ways to flip tables, but most of all they have the ability to bring us together. Aww. This is a phenomenon that the creators of the new Call of Duty entry WWII seem to be well aware of and made the center of their new trailer "“Reassemble!” which launched on October 15. In it, we see a tropey but self-aware story using the plotline of the gang getting back together for one more hit, but this time it's for the return of the game. "Haven't you heard? Call of Duty is going back to World War II baby," the inciting member says to a squad member, "we gotta get the guys back together," he replies. The ensuing scenes include the gathering of the squad through various settings. It's endearing and seems to be translating well for fans, at least so far. As of publishing this article, the like/dislike ratio sits at 17,000 likes to 1,000 dislikes. Significantly better than Call of Duty trailers have faired in the past. The Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Reveal Trailer currently has a bitter ratio of 581,000 likes to 3 million dislikes. Ouch. The WWII launch trailer is at 1 million likes to 97,000 dislikes, by the way, possibly showing tempered expectations. Call of Duty: World War II launches November 3 to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. How do you feel about Call of Duty returning to WWII? Are your hopes high for the latest installment? Let us know in the comments below. View full article
  2. First Person Shooters have a certain ability. They can raise our blood pressure, help us invent new ways to flip tables, but most of all they have the ability to bring us together. Aww. This is a phenomenon that the creators of the new Call of Duty entry WWII seem to be well aware of and made the center of their new trailer "“Reassemble!” which launched on October 15. In it, we see a tropey but self-aware story using the plotline of the gang getting back together for one more hit, but this time it's for the return of the game. "Haven't you heard? Call of Duty is going back to World War II baby," the inciting member says to a squad member, "we gotta get the guys back together," he replies. The ensuing scenes include the gathering of the squad through various settings. It's endearing and seems to be translating well for fans, at least so far. As of publishing this article, the like/dislike ratio sits at 17,000 likes to 1,000 dislikes. Significantly better than Call of Duty trailers have faired in the past. The Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Reveal Trailer currently has a bitter ratio of 581,000 likes to 3 million dislikes. Ouch. The WWII launch trailer is at 1 million likes to 97,000 dislikes, by the way, possibly showing tempered expectations. Call of Duty: World War II launches November 3 to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. How do you feel about Call of Duty returning to WWII? Are your hopes high for the latest installment? Let us know in the comments below.
  3. Gaming News:IGN Acquires Humble Bundle

    @herobyclicking added! Thanks for the catch, I thought I added that detail but I just linked it
  4. On October 13 it was announced that "pay what you want" platform Humble Bundle was acquired by media company IGN. Full details of the transaction have not been formally released, but the news has been confirmed by both parties. Humble Bundle elaborated on the acquisition in a blog post titled "Humble Bundle is Joining Forces with IGN!" Within the post, Co-Founder and CEO of the company Jeffrey Rosen stays relatively vague but offers insight into why they chose IGN and what resources they have gained. "We chose IGN because they really understand our vision, share our passion for games, and believe in our mission to promote awesome digital content while helping charity. I can’t think of a better partner than IGN to help Humble Bundle continue our quest," said Rosen. It seems as though Humble Bundle's outward motivation was gaining a support network that a huge company like IGN would definitely possess. "We will continue to bring you all of our humble products, but with more resources and help from IGN," said Rosen. Along that note, the company seems like it will still maintain its separate identity with the CEO saying, "we will keep our own office, culture, and amazing team with IGN helping us further our plans. We will raise even more money for charity." The way that Humble Bundle works, gamers are able to get games for a lower price but are incentivized to pay more than the base price with some of those dollars going to charity. Since their founding, HB states that they have been able to donate about $106 million. Some of the charities that they have supported include GamesAid, Make a Wish, American Red Cross, Save the Children, War Child, Worldreader, WWF, Zidisha and of course Extra Life . Their current charity is SpecialEffect. Since the sale of games is involved, there easily could be an ethical line crossed by IGN in their game coverage. Polygon was able to get this statement from Executive Vice President and General Manager at IGN Mitch Galbraith, "editorial integrity is something we take very seriously at IGN, and I am confident that we will strike the right balance when it comes to our coverage of Humble Bundle and the games they sell. Our readers and customers have always come first — and that won’t change." Have you ever used Humble Bundle? What do you think of a media company acquiring a company that sells games? Let us know in the comments below. View full article
  5. IGN Acquires Humble Bundle

    On October 13 it was announced that "pay what you want" platform Humble Bundle was acquired by media company IGN. Full details of the transaction have not been formally released, but the news has been confirmed by both parties. Humble Bundle elaborated on the acquisition in a blog post titled "Humble Bundle is Joining Forces with IGN!" Within the post, Co-Founder and CEO of the company Jeffrey Rosen stays relatively vague but offers insight into why they chose IGN and what resources they have gained. "We chose IGN because they really understand our vision, share our passion for games, and believe in our mission to promote awesome digital content while helping charity. I can’t think of a better partner than IGN to help Humble Bundle continue our quest," said Rosen. It seems as though Humble Bundle's outward motivation was gaining a support network that a huge company like IGN would definitely possess. "We will continue to bring you all of our humble products, but with more resources and help from IGN," said Rosen. Along that note, the company seems like it will still maintain its separate identity with the CEO saying, "we will keep our own office, culture, and amazing team with IGN helping us further our plans. We will raise even more money for charity." The way that Humble Bundle works, gamers are able to get games for a lower price but are incentivized to pay more than the base price with some of those dollars going to charity. Since their founding, HB states that they have been able to donate about $106 million. Some of the charities that they have supported include GamesAid, Make a Wish, American Red Cross, Save the Children, War Child, Worldreader, WWF, Zidisha and of course Extra Life . Their current charity is SpecialEffect. Since the sale of games is involved, there easily could be an ethical line crossed by IGN in their game coverage. Polygon was able to get this statement from Executive Vice President and General Manager at IGN Mitch Galbraith, "editorial integrity is something we take very seriously at IGN, and I am confident that we will strike the right balance when it comes to our coverage of Humble Bundle and the games they sell. Our readers and customers have always come first — and that won’t change." Have you ever used Humble Bundle? What do you think of a media company acquiring a company that sells games? Let us know in the comments below.
  6. After a couple of delays, it seems like it's finally safe to be excited for the release of South Park: The Fractured But Whole. And last night's latest entry into the core TV series season 21, episode 4 "Franchise Prequel " all but solidified the fact that yes, the new South Park game is indeed coming out in less than a week. The new episode aired October 11 and starts out with a superhero audition and evolves into commentary about Facebook. Innocent enough right? We've had episodes with the gang running around in superhero garb before, but there was more than just a subtle nod to the upcoming game at the end of the episode. In the final scene, there was a dialogue that will seem familiar to anyone who saw the E3 2016 trailer since its almost the exactly same (save a few edits). We see the group splitting up into two "franchises" creating the conflict for the game. With all of this in mind, Matt and Trey are probably giving us a hint to who at least one of the in-game villains will be, Mark Zuckerberg. Some background, in the episode some alarming pictures show up on Facebook of the Coon and Friends, thanks to Professor Chaos' ingenious and devious plan to slander them via the web. The parents of the SP universe, as competent as ever invite Mark Zuckerberg to the tiny mountain town to resolve things. Zuckerberg proves to be more trouble than he's worth (and has a weird dubbed voice?) and refuses to be "blocked" out of town. And if you needed any more evidence that the episode and game are indeed tied together, South Park tweeted this out in anticipation of the airing. The game officially releases on Tuesday, October 17. It follows its 2014 predecessor South Park: The Stick of Truth. Both games feature RPG gameplay closely resembling the style of the show. Will you be playing The Fractured But Whole? How do you think gameplay will differ from The Stick of Truth? View full article
  7. After a couple of delays, it seems like it's finally safe to be excited for the release of South Park: The Fractured But Whole. And last night's latest entry into the core TV series season 21, episode 4 "Franchise Prequel " all but solidified the fact that yes, the new South Park game is indeed coming out in less than a week. The new episode aired October 11 and starts out with a superhero audition and evolves into commentary about Facebook. Innocent enough right? We've had episodes with the gang running around in superhero garb before, but there was more than just a subtle nod to the upcoming game at the end of the episode. In the final scene, there was a dialogue that will seem familiar to anyone who saw the E3 2016 trailer since its almost the exactly same (save a few edits). We see the group splitting up into two "franchises" creating the conflict for the game. With all of this in mind, Matt and Trey are probably giving us a hint to who at least one of the in-game villains will be, Mark Zuckerberg. Some background, in the episode some alarming pictures show up on Facebook of the Coon and Friends, thanks to Professor Chaos' ingenious and devious plan to slander them via the web. The parents of the SP universe, as competent as ever invite Mark Zuckerberg to the tiny mountain town to resolve things. Zuckerberg proves to be more trouble than he's worth (and has a weird dubbed voice?) and refuses to be "blocked" out of town. And if you needed any more evidence that the episode and game are indeed tied together, South Park tweeted this out in anticipation of the airing. The game officially releases on Tuesday, October 17. It follows its 2014 predecessor South Park: The Stick of Truth. Both games feature RPG gameplay closely resembling the style of the show. Will you be playing The Fractured But Whole? How do you think gameplay will differ from The Stick of Truth?
  8. Review: Lock's Quest

    That last wave of Clockwork horrors has left me exhausted with my defeat looming imminent. The enemy infiltrated my barriers, and have begun their final push toward their objective. The stronghold will be destroyed within seconds once they break through, but I’ve got the next round planned. I’ve assessed my strategy and know how to hold the oncoming Clockwork army back until I can regroup. This round my plan will surely... wait, no! How did they get through there that fast? Wait! Lock’s Quest immerses players in tower defense gameplay with RPG elements sprinkled in. The game first hit the scene in 2008 when THQ released it on the Nintendo DS. At release, it enjoyed a bit of a cult status with mixed reviews from critics. On May 30, 2017, the remaster released on consoles with updated music, controls, and graphics, as well as the addition of extra content. The new graphics slap a new coat of paint on Lock's Quest that looks like an isometric mash-up of Pokémon and Stardew Valley. While music and UI got the remaster treatment, combat saw expansion. A new progression system, strategy elements, map, endless mode and other features were added to appeal to old fans of the series as well as "sophisticated gamers" according to the new features listed on the game's website. This beefing up affects build and combat gameplay (more on those modes later). The progression system now aligns with the plot, unlocking relevant goodies for build-mode. And the remaster also boasts speedier build/combat cycles so players can assess their strategy if necessary to tackle the next wave more effectively. While I did get frustrated when I failed a stage, I did appreciate the ability to reset and tackle the challenge with new knowledge. However, I did occasionally have issues with crashing when attempting to do so. Speaking of building and combat, 5th Cell structured gameplay around tower defense into two distinct modes: Build Mode and Battle Mode. Players have a time limit on their barricade planning in Build Mode. This barricade protects an objective and must withstand a barrage of enemies within the combat time limit. The tools and resources at your disposal correspond to progress as the enemies get more diverse and stronger. Structure options include walls, turrets, land mines, soldiers, and more. The currency you'll use to construct your barricade comes from defeating enemies and adds a depth to the difficulty. If you're not doing well in your planning it will carry over to the next level. During the battle phase you have control of Lock, and depending on your progress, he has different abilities. At the very beginning of the game though he has a vital skill called ratcheting where he repairs the damage done to structures. His other abilities range from attacks and energy drains to more advanced repair and money drops. The enemy, the Clockwork focus on attacking your infrastructure during this stage. Guiding Lock will help you save your defenses for future rounds and help earn some currency. The foundation for the civilization of the Kingdom where Lock's Quest takes place surrounds the discovery of an element called Source, aka that currency we were talking about earlier. Source doesn't really have an explanation, but people who have been dubbed Archineers found a way to manipulate it. The magical stuff powers defense items, like what Lock builds and uses. Conflict came when one Archineer found that Source could replicate life and utilized this ability. The king banished this Archineer. This Archineer then became Lord Agony and created the Clockwork, "living" machines, in retaliation. Lord Agony disappeared seemingly defeated, but the details of the battle remain unclear to the world's inhabitants. This all happened before the events of the game. One thing is clear, however, the Clockwork have returned. Players participate in the current, battle-ridden world as the titular Lock, a young hero with an unclear past but a determination to pave his future. Lock lives with his sister Emi and grandfather Tobias. One day while making repairs to structures on the shore Lock and Emi come across a wounded Archineer who fled from a battle against the Clockwork. The wounded Archineer enlists Lock to help fend off an upcoming attack. In the chaos of the attack, Emi is lost, the town falls under the attack and Lock gets determined to defeat the Clockwork. What I could really get behind in terms of the story was the fact that it explained the gameplay. Lock's Quest's use of story makes it unique. Rather than arbitrarily running alongside the gameplay, the story seeks to explain the presence of the RTS gameplay. Lock has Archineer abilities and can manipulate source making him able to build turrets. This makes sense with this context. Rather than expecting players to just accept the mechanics of the game, the devs did a good job of weaving it into the story. Not a small feat for a tower defense. While Lock's Quest's strength shines in its storytelling, its weaknesses lie in combat. Isometric view is standard in games like this, but I found myself fighting with it during the battle sequences. Moving Lock around was painful. The slow movement became especially noticeable while fighting under the constraints of a time limit on a battlefield swarmed with enemies. I also had some issues with crashing and having to restart. I wasn't a happy gamer when I discovered that the cutscenes were unskippable. Conclusion: While frustrating at times, Lock's Quest provides engaging mechanics that makes you want to progress. I found it a little addicting to see how the enemy would interact with my builds, and the degree to which they would be successful. And like a good little gamer I was driven by the need to unlock new gear to fortify. Crashes and trouble finding Lock during a stressful attack sequence definitely detracted from my initial experiences, but overall this title had me pushing my left brain during combat and engaged my right with the world it managed to create. Lock's Quest was reviewed on Xbox One and is also available on PC, PlayStation 4, and Nintendo DS.
  9. Feature: Review: Lock's Quest

    That last wave of Clockwork horrors has left me exhausted with my defeat looming imminent. The enemy infiltrated my barriers, and have begun their final push toward their objective. The stronghold will be destroyed within seconds once they break through, but I’ve got the next round planned. I’ve assessed my strategy and know how to hold the oncoming Clockwork army back until I can regroup. This round my plan will surely... wait, no! How did they get through there that fast? Wait! Lock’s Quest immerses players in tower defense gameplay with RPG elements sprinkled in. The game first hit the scene in 2008 when THQ released it on the Nintendo DS. At release, it enjoyed a bit of a cult status with mixed reviews from critics. On May 30, 2017, the remaster released on consoles with updated music, controls, and graphics, as well as the addition of extra content. The new graphics slap a new coat of paint on Lock's Quest that looks like an isometric mash-up of Pokémon and Stardew Valley. While music and UI got the remaster treatment, combat saw expansion. A new progression system, strategy elements, map, endless mode and other features were added to appeal to old fans of the series as well as "sophisticated gamers" according to the new features listed on the game's website. This beefing up affects build and combat gameplay (more on those modes later). The progression system now aligns with the plot, unlocking relevant goodies for build-mode. And the remaster also boasts speedier build/combat cycles so players can assess their strategy if necessary to tackle the next wave more effectively. While I did get frustrated when I failed a stage, I did appreciate the ability to reset and tackle the challenge with new knowledge. However, I did occasionally have issues with crashing when attempting to do so. Speaking of building and combat, 5th Cell structured gameplay around tower defense into two distinct modes: Build Mode and Battle Mode. Players have a time limit on their barricade planning in Build Mode. This barricade protects an objective and must withstand a barrage of enemies within the combat time limit. The tools and resources at your disposal correspond to progress as the enemies get more diverse and stronger. Structure options include walls, turrets, land mines, soldiers, and more. The currency you'll use to construct your barricade comes from defeating enemies and adds a depth to the difficulty. If you're not doing well in your planning it will carry over to the next level. During the battle phase you have control of Lock, and depending on your progress, he has different abilities. At the very beginning of the game though he has a vital skill called ratcheting where he repairs the damage done to structures. His other abilities range from attacks and energy drains to more advanced repair and money drops. The enemy, the Clockwork focus on attacking your infrastructure during this stage. Guiding Lock will help you save your defenses for future rounds and help earn some currency. The foundation for the civilization of the Kingdom where Lock's Quest takes place surrounds the discovery of an element called Source, aka that currency we were talking about earlier. Source doesn't really have an explanation, but people who have been dubbed Archineers found a way to manipulate it. The magical stuff powers defense items, like what Lock builds and uses. Conflict came when one Archineer found that Source could replicate life and utilized this ability. The king banished this Archineer. This Archineer then became Lord Agony and created the Clockwork, "living" machines, in retaliation. Lord Agony disappeared seemingly defeated, but the details of the battle remain unclear to the world's inhabitants. This all happened before the events of the game. One thing is clear, however, the Clockwork have returned. Players participate in the current, battle-ridden world as the titular Lock, a young hero with an unclear past but a determination to pave his future. Lock lives with his sister Emi and grandfather Tobias. One day while making repairs to structures on the shore Lock and Emi come across a wounded Archineer who fled from a battle against the Clockwork. The wounded Archineer enlists Lock to help fend off an upcoming attack. In the chaos of the attack, Emi is lost, the town falls under the attack and Lock gets determined to defeat the Clockwork. What I could really get behind in terms of the story was the fact that it explained the gameplay. Lock's Quest's use of story makes it unique. Rather than arbitrarily running alongside the gameplay, the story seeks to explain the presence of the RTS gameplay. Lock has Archineer abilities and can manipulate source making him able to build turrets. This makes sense with this context. Rather than expecting players to just accept the mechanics of the game, the devs did a good job of weaving it into the story. Not a small feat for a tower defense. While Lock's Quest's strength shines in its storytelling, its weaknesses lie in combat. Isometric view is standard in games like this, but I found myself fighting with it during the battle sequences. Moving Lock around was painful. The slow movement became especially noticeable while fighting under the constraints of a time limit on a battlefield swarmed with enemies. I also had some issues with crashing and having to restart. I wasn't a happy gamer when I discovered that the cutscenes were unskippable. Conclusion: While frustrating at times, Lock's Quest provides engaging mechanics that makes you want to progress. I found it a little addicting to see how the enemy would interact with my builds, and the degree to which they would be successful. And like a good little gamer I was driven by the need to unlock new gear to fortify. Crashes and trouble finding Lock during a stressful attack sequence definitely detracted from my initial experiences, but overall this title had me pushing my left brain during combat and engaged my right with the world it managed to create. Lock's Quest was reviewed on Xbox One and is also available on PC, PlayStation 4, and Nintendo DS. View full article
  10. Feature: Review: Slime Rancher

    Let me get one thing perfectly clear, Slime Rancher is absolutely adorable. The premise behind the game keeps things simple. You play as Beatrix LeBeau, a young Earthling who traveled a thousand light years to reach the Far, Far Range. Your mission: Ranch some slimes. Daily life consists of cultivating and caring for these critters as well as exploring the alien landscape. Some standard procedures apply here; you'll have to work your way from the bottom to make a profit. Generally, you feed the slimes various resources found in the world then harvest and sell the plorts they produce as the result. Yes, slime poo equals money. Any cash, aka newbucks, you make goes back into the farm and your equipment as you expand, upgrade, and unlock new areas. When not keeping up with daily duties at the slime ranch, players can venture out into the world to discover new slimes and the various foods that keep them fed. Beatrix has something called a vacpack with her at all times, a very handy tool that can suck up pretty much anything. Players use this to collect slimes and resources as well as for self defense. I first played Slime Rancher when it came out on Early Access to PC in 2016. I played... and I didn't stop until I had unlocked everything possible and made so many newbucks. In short, I utterly consumed the game and wanted more. Since then Monomi Park has been adding content up to its full release on August 1. A majority of these updates include new areas of the map like the Ancient Ruins, Indigo Quarry and Glass Desert. With the new areas came new slimes, resources, story elements and other features. December last year the game saw a major gameplay mechanic addition with Slime Science, which allows players to craft various slime-related gadgets in their ranch's lab. This game feeds my brain in the same way that cat memes do. It's pretty much impossible to have any negative emotions while playing. The world has bright and colorful elements and the slimes make ridiculous noises. An achievement called "Boop!" is unlocked if you let the kitty slime "headbutt you right on the nose." Dawww. And good news for the cynics out there who might be allergic to this particular brand of game: Slime Rancher does cutesy right. It's not only adorable, it's also charming. Sure, pink blobs sprout kitty ears, but the whole game is centered around harvesting poo. Text throughout the game understands this tone. Take, for example, another achievement titled "You... Monster!" where you "send an adorable chick to a fiery end, the same place you're now destined to go." The world allows you set your own pace and project yourself into it. The "story" comes from what you seek out. If you wanted, you could just play the core farming and exploration loop. No cut scenes or voice acting interrupts you. The only time you'll see the protagonist is in the opening menu and when in the ranch house. To get the story, players will have to read Starmail, the Ranch Exchange, and notes that are found throughout the world. The main motivation in gameplay lies in unlocking new areas and features. The thrill of opening up new zones and abilities keeps the game going, however that comes with a caveat. Once you unlock a sizable piece of the content, the game kind of loses its luster. With everything unlocked and maxed out, making money remains the only thing left to do. Luckily, the lifespan of the game extends with the added content. Hopefully Monomi Park will keep updating and add new areas and slimes. Conclusion: Slime Rancher speaks to my soul. Sure, it might be in a gurgling slime language, but I'll take it. I can indulge my need to surround myself with cute things in this little segment of adorable escapism. While the game might not keep me entertained forever, it does a really good job as a mood enhancer in the meantime. A word to the wise, tearing away from the game will be tough. Plorts always need harvesting, so make sure to clear your schedule and allot a decent amount of time to get immersed in Slime Rancher. Slime Rancher was reviewed on Xbox One and is also available on PC. It is available for free download from now until Aug. 31 as a part of Xbox Games With Gold. View full article
  11. Review: Slime Rancher

    Let me get one thing perfectly clear, Slime Rancher is absolutely adorable. The premise behind the game keeps things simple. You play as Beatrix LeBeau, a young Earthling who traveled a thousand light years to reach the Far, Far Range. Your mission: Ranch some slimes. Daily life consists of cultivating and caring for these critters as well as exploring the alien landscape. Some standard procedures apply here; you'll have to work your way from the bottom to make a profit. Generally, you feed the slimes various resources found in the world then harvest and sell the plorts they produce as the result. Yes, slime poo equals money. Any cash, aka newbucks, you make goes back into the farm and your equipment as you expand, upgrade, and unlock new areas. When not keeping up with daily duties at the slime ranch, players can venture out into the world to discover new slimes and the various foods that keep them fed. Beatrix has something called a vacpack with her at all times, a very handy tool that can suck up pretty much anything. Players use this to collect slimes and resources as well as for self defense. I first played Slime Rancher when it came out on Early Access to PC in 2016. I played... and I didn't stop until I had unlocked everything possible and made so many newbucks. In short, I utterly consumed the game and wanted more. Since then Monomi Park has been adding content up to its full release on August 1. A majority of these updates include new areas of the map like the Ancient Ruins, Indigo Quarry and Glass Desert. With the new areas came new slimes, resources, story elements and other features. December last year the game saw a major gameplay mechanic addition with Slime Science, which allows players to craft various slime-related gadgets in their ranch's lab. This game feeds my brain in the same way that cat memes do. It's pretty much impossible to have any negative emotions while playing. The world has bright and colorful elements and the slimes make ridiculous noises. An achievement called "Boop!" is unlocked if you let the kitty slime "headbutt you right on the nose." Dawww. And good news for the cynics out there who might be allergic to this particular brand of game: Slime Rancher does cutesy right. It's not only adorable, it's also charming. Sure, pink blobs sprout kitty ears, but the whole game is centered around harvesting poo. Text throughout the game understands this tone. Take, for example, another achievement titled "You... Monster!" where you "send an adorable chick to a fiery end, the same place you're now destined to go." The world allows you set your own pace and project yourself into it. The "story" comes from what you seek out. If you wanted, you could just play the core farming and exploration loop. No cut scenes or voice acting interrupts you. The only time you'll see the protagonist is in the opening menu and when in the ranch house. To get the story, players will have to read Starmail, the Ranch Exchange, and notes that are found throughout the world. The main motivation in gameplay lies in unlocking new areas and features. The thrill of opening up new zones and abilities keeps the game going, however that comes with a caveat. Once you unlock a sizable piece of the content, the game kind of loses its luster. With everything unlocked and maxed out, making money remains the only thing left to do. Luckily, the lifespan of the game extends with the added content. Hopefully Monomi Park will keep updating and add new areas and slimes. Conclusion: Slime Rancher speaks to my soul. Sure, it might be in a gurgling slime language, but I'll take it. I can indulge my need to surround myself with cute things in this little segment of adorable escapism. While the game might not keep me entertained forever, it does a really good job as a mood enhancer in the meantime. A word to the wise, tearing away from the game will be tough. Plorts always need harvesting, so make sure to clear your schedule and allot a decent amount of time to get immersed in Slime Rancher. Slime Rancher was reviewed on Xbox One and is also available on PC. It is available for free download from now until Aug. 31 as a part of Xbox Games With Gold.
  12. Immediately, Strange Brigade establishes the kind of game it wants to be. There’s a delightful narrator guiding your way and describing the various baddies you’re about to face. Those enemies materialize in the form of a deluge of classic movie/Skull Island monsters. Our heroes fight threats to civilization itself in a 1930’s “safari into danger.” It’s marvelously over the top and an homage to the films of yesteryear and adventure itself. At E3 2017 I got the chance to demo Strange Brigade in its early form. While playing, I spoke with the the developers about the film influences behind it as well as the tone they were going for. Movie series like Indiana Jones and The Mummy were cited, as well as the bold stylings of Saturday Matinee. Strange Brigade is not meant to be taken too seriously, and the devs stressed the mix of action, comedy and spookiness to create the ongoing atmosphere of an "upbeat action adventure." The map I played had a mixture of ruins with tombs and a whole lot of mummies and other undead. Puzzle elements were present with secret areas with extra loot to be found. Gameplay will be enjoyable for those well versed in taking on many enemies and finding creative ways to destroy waves of ‘em. I played solo, but could see the appeal of co-op. Strange Brigade may prove to be a game without any extraordinarily unique features, but the attention to aesthetic detail will keep it fun. It’s thoroughly charming, and the focus on co-op for up to four players will extend its playability. We don’t have a release date yet for Strange Brigade, but it will be coming to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. View full article
  13. Immediately, Strange Brigade establishes the kind of game it wants to be. There’s a delightful narrator guiding your way and describing the various baddies you’re about to face. Those enemies materialize in the form of a deluge of classic movie/Skull Island monsters. Our heroes fight threats to civilization itself in a 1930’s “safari into danger.” It’s marvelously over the top and an homage to the films of yesteryear and adventure itself. At E3 2017 I got the chance to demo Strange Brigade in its early form. While playing, I spoke with the the developers about the film influences behind it as well as the tone they were going for. Movie series like Indiana Jones and The Mummy were cited, as well as the bold stylings of Saturday Matinee. Strange Brigade is not meant to be taken too seriously, and the devs stressed the mix of action, comedy and spookiness to create the ongoing atmosphere of an "upbeat action adventure." The map I played had a mixture of ruins with tombs and a whole lot of mummies and other undead. Puzzle elements were present with secret areas with extra loot to be found. Gameplay will be enjoyable for those well versed in taking on many enemies and finding creative ways to destroy waves of ‘em. I played solo, but could see the appeal of co-op. Strange Brigade may prove to be a game without any extraordinarily unique features, but the attention to aesthetic detail will keep it fun. It’s thoroughly charming, and the focus on co-op for up to four players will extend its playability. We don’t have a release date yet for Strange Brigade, but it will be coming to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC.
  14. At E3 2017, independent UK studio Rebellion highlighted their upcoming Rogue Trooper Redux which releases Oct. 17. Rogue Trooper initially released in 2006 to PlayStation 2 and Xbox. Gameplay is in third-person shooter format and follows the titular hero Rogue as he navigates the world Nu-Earth, the last survivor of his unit of genetic infantrymen. Though his fellow GI’s lose their form as blue troopers, their engineering allows them to live on in Rogue’s gear through implanted biochips. The redux is a remaster and upgrades the 2006 graphics to HD, remodels assets, updates lighting, enhancing geometry along with other visual aspects. New features have been added as well that include additional difficulty settings, a revamped cover system, and modernized controls. I got the chance to experience the reboot first hand during a demo at E3. The demo took place during the first part of the game as each of Rogue’s squad members are getting attacked and “die.” After failing to save them, Rogue implants each into various pieces of his equipment. Each implant not only gave Rogue's arsenal multiple personalities but also new abilities. This was an interesting mechanic and it presented a dimension to gameplay. From the Rogue Trooper Redux website, “Gunnar turns your rifle into a sentry gun and boosts your accuracy under fire. Helm offers tactical advice and distracts enemies. Bagman can manufacture custom ammo, salvage parts, upgrade weapons and even lay minefields.” Gameplay is straightforward third-person fare with an extraterrestrial backdrop. There are plenty of explosions and over the top events with gameplay mechanics switching up to keep things interesting. What was most compelling to play around with was the aforementioned abilities implanted in the gear. Staying true to the source material was a priority for the team in 2006 and that remains true today. "We tried our best to take the inspiration of the comic and do it justice, and I think we really did achieve that," said Rich May, one of the original game's programmers. The reboot will be a chance for players who missed the game the first time around to jump into the Rogue Trooper universe. "It's really cool to see it out there again," said May, who went on to comment about how social media has allowed them to connect to a wide array of fans of the game as well as the comics. May also hopes for the game to reach a new audience. "It's one of my favorite things I've ever worked on," he said. Rogue Trooper Redux will release to Nintendo Switch (date TBD), PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC for $24.99. View full article
  15. At E3 2017, independent UK studio Rebellion highlighted their upcoming Rogue Trooper Redux which releases Oct. 17. Rogue Trooper initially released in 2006 to PlayStation 2 and Xbox. Gameplay is in third-person shooter format and follows the titular hero Rogue as he navigates the world Nu-Earth, the last survivor of his unit of genetic infantrymen. Though his fellow GI’s lose their form as blue troopers, their engineering allows them to live on in Rogue’s gear through implanted biochips. The redux is a remaster and upgrades the 2006 graphics to HD, remodels assets, updates lighting, enhancing geometry along with other visual aspects. New features have been added as well that include additional difficulty settings, a revamped cover system, and modernized controls. I got the chance to experience the reboot first hand during a demo at E3. The demo took place during the first part of the game as each of Rogue’s squad members are getting attacked and “die.” After failing to save them, Rogue implants each into various pieces of his equipment. Each implant not only gave Rogue's arsenal multiple personalities but also new abilities. This was an interesting mechanic and it presented a dimension to gameplay. From the Rogue Trooper Redux website, “Gunnar turns your rifle into a sentry gun and boosts your accuracy under fire. Helm offers tactical advice and distracts enemies. Bagman can manufacture custom ammo, salvage parts, upgrade weapons and even lay minefields.” Gameplay is straightforward third-person fare with an extraterrestrial backdrop. There are plenty of explosions and over the top events with gameplay mechanics switching up to keep things interesting. What was most compelling to play around with was the aforementioned abilities implanted in the gear. Staying true to the source material was a priority for the team in 2006 and that remains true today. "We tried our best to take the inspiration of the comic and do it justice, and I think we really did achieve that," said Rich May, one of the original game's programmers. The reboot will be a chance for players who missed the game the first time around to jump into the Rogue Trooper universe. "It's really cool to see it out there again," said May, who went on to comment about how social media has allowed them to connect to a wide array of fans of the game as well as the comics. May also hopes for the game to reach a new audience. "It's one of my favorite things I've ever worked on," he said. Rogue Trooper Redux will release to Nintendo Switch (date TBD), PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC for $24.99.