Naomi N. Lugo

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About Naomi N. Lugo

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  • Birthday 06/10/1992

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    Minneapolis

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  1. It's official, the game that took 10 years to develop is one year old. Final Fantasy XV celebrated it's first birthday today and to celebrate Square Enix made a few announcements. To commemorate the event, Square Enix held what it called an “Active Time Report” which was a live stream with voice actors from the game and Kingsglaive and discussed "the past, present, and future of Final Fantasy XV." The biggest news to come from the stream was the details of December update. It was revealed that players will be able to switch between Noctis Ignis, Prompto and Gladio during the main campaign of the game. While there are some restrictions to this, notably the Chapter 9 Leviathan fight, this feature is available mostly in the open world. During the Japanese stream, it was revealed that there would be more episodic installments for the game with Episode Ardyn being confirmed as one of them. There was no word on the character focus for the other two, but there has been speculation that they might be about Aranea and Lunafreya. Yes please. The goal for release on these is 2018. In addition to all of that, we also got to see the first three opening minutes of the upcoming Episode Ignis which will be released Dec. 13. The multiplayer expansion Comrades made an appearance as well with the update on that coming out around the same time as Episode Ignis. Updates for Comrades are also planned for next year, with the possibility of a playable Noctis, Ignis, Gladio and Prompto. FFXV wouldn't be anywhere without its fans, and Square included its players in the celebration with a Moogle Fan Art Competition. "To help celebrate the one year anniversary of FFXV, we’ve made a limited number of handmade FFXV moogles, kupo!" said the announcement. The competition is open now until Dec. 31. View full article
  2. It's official, the game that took 10 years to develop is one year old. Final Fantasy XV celebrated it's first birthday today and to celebrate Square Enix made a few announcements. To commemorate the event, Square Enix held what it called an “Active Time Report” which was a live stream with voice actors from the game and Kingsglaive and discussed "the past, present, and future of Final Fantasy XV." The biggest news to come from the stream was the details of December update. It was revealed that players will be able to switch between Noctis Ignis, Prompto and Gladio during the main campaign of the game. While there are some restrictions to this, notably the Chapter 9 Leviathan fight, this feature is available mostly in the open world. During the Japanese stream, it was revealed that there would be more episodic installments for the game with Episode Ardyn being confirmed as one of them. There was no word on the character focus for the other two, but there has been speculation that they might be about Aranea and Lunafreya. Yes please. The goal for release on these is 2018. In addition to all of that, we also got to see the first three opening minutes of the upcoming Episode Ignis which will be released Dec. 13. The multiplayer expansion Comrades made an appearance as well with the update on that coming out around the same time as Episode Ignis. Updates for Comrades are also planned for next year, with the possibility of a playable Noctis, Ignis, Gladio and Prompto. FFXV wouldn't be anywhere without its fans, and Square included its players in the celebration with a Moogle Fan Art Competition. "To help celebrate the one year anniversary of FFXV, we’ve made a limited number of handmade FFXV moogles, kupo!" said the announcement. The competition is open now until Dec. 31.
  3. Things have not been going well for Bungie and Destiny 2 lately. Fans have already been more than a little steamed at a lack of endgame content, a flawed loot system and a need for more of everything really. The latest revelation of a rigged XP system has only provided a tipping point. Reddit user EnergiserX exposed the XP discrepancies through testing and data calculation. To sum up their findings, "to get one thing clear: there is no cap to XP. You can keep earning XP as fast as you want, and you will always be making progress towards that next bright engram. You will just face dramatically diminishing returns the faster you go." Bungie responded initially in a blog post simply titled "XP in Destiny 2" but fans were not satiated. In another attempt to address their fan's concerns, Bungie announced via another blog post that they had canceled their stream scheduled for Nov. 29. The stream was planned to show off the upcoming DLC “Curse of Osiris” but will instead now focus on "delivering some higher priority information about Destiny 2." The post is short and vague, but lets players know that they'll hear from "studio leadership" about what they think of the game, goals, what's planned for future updates and reactions to feedback. Only time will tell if the information will be able to get players back on Bungie's side. "Curse of Osiris" is the first expansion for Destiny 2 and is set to release Dec. 5. Update: see the accompanying blog post with update list and message from Bungie by clicking here. Are you frustrated by Destiny 2 end game content? Do you think Bungie will be able to recover from this controversy? Let us know in the comment section below. View full article
  4. Things have not been going well for Bungie and Destiny 2 lately. Fans have already been more than a little steamed at a lack of endgame content, a flawed loot system and a need for more of everything really. The latest revelation of a rigged XP system has only provided a tipping point. Reddit user EnergiserX exposed the XP discrepancies through testing and data calculation. To sum up their findings, "to get one thing clear: there is no cap to XP. You can keep earning XP as fast as you want, and you will always be making progress towards that next bright engram. You will just face dramatically diminishing returns the faster you go." Bungie responded initially in a blog post simply titled "XP in Destiny 2" but fans were not satiated. In another attempt to address their fan's concerns, Bungie announced via another blog post that they had canceled their stream scheduled for Nov. 29. The stream was planned to show off the upcoming DLC “Curse of Osiris” but will instead now focus on "delivering some higher priority information about Destiny 2." The post is short and vague, but lets players know that they'll hear from "studio leadership" about what they think of the game, goals, what's planned for future updates and reactions to feedback. Only time will tell if the information will be able to get players back on Bungie's side. "Curse of Osiris" is the first expansion for Destiny 2 and is set to release Dec. 5. Update: see the accompanying blog post with update list and message from Bungie by clicking here. Are you frustrated by Destiny 2 end game content? Do you think Bungie will be able to recover from this controversy? Let us know in the comment section below.
  5. On Nov. 19 Niantic challenged the trainers of the world. Catch 3 billion Pokémon in a week. The rewards included short-time access to the previously region-locked Farfetch'd (worldwide) and Kangaskhan (in East Asia) as well as other in-game buffs. Players succeeded in the lofty goal on Sunday, catching 3.36 billion. As an added bonus, Niantic announced a surprise perk today, legendary Pokémon Ho-Oh can now be found at Raid Battles at Gyms. Ho-Oh will only be catchable for a limited time until Tuesday, Dec. 12. The Global Catch Challenge, as it was formally called ran alongside a campaign called Pokémon GO Travel. In the video series, enlisted community stars explored various locations in Japan hunting for Pokémon while giving the global community daily updates on the challenge process. This challenge was the first of its kind, but it's not the first time that legendary Pokémon have been in the game. Like Ho-Oh, these Pokémon are only attainable through raid battles and can be caught during a limited time. Articuno, Zapdos, Moltres and Lugia were available earlier this year. Raikou, Entei and Suicune are currently available until Nov. 30 in rotating regions. Mewtwo is available through exclusive invite-only raids. Have you caught any legendary Pokémon? Did you participate in the Global Catch Challenge? Let us know in the comments below. View full article
  6. On Nov. 19 Niantic challenged the trainers of the world. Catch 3 billion Pokémon in a week. The rewards included short-time access to the previously region-locked Farfetch'd (worldwide) and Kangaskhan (in East Asia) as well as other in-game buffs. Players succeeded in the lofty goal on Sunday, catching 3.36 billion. As an added bonus, Niantic announced a surprise perk today, legendary Pokémon Ho-Oh can now be found at Raid Battles at Gyms. Ho-Oh will only be catchable for a limited time until Tuesday, Dec. 12. The Global Catch Challenge, as it was formally called ran alongside a campaign called Pokémon GO Travel. In the video series, enlisted community stars explored various locations in Japan hunting for Pokémon while giving the global community daily updates on the challenge process. This challenge was the first of its kind, but it's not the first time that legendary Pokémon have been in the game. Like Ho-Oh, these Pokémon are only attainable through raid battles and can be caught during a limited time. Articuno, Zapdos, Moltres and Lugia were available earlier this year. Raikou, Entei and Suicune are currently available until Nov. 30 in rotating regions. Mewtwo is available through exclusive invite-only raids. Have you caught any legendary Pokémon? Did you participate in the Global Catch Challenge? Let us know in the comments below.
  7. First Person Shooters have a certain ability. They can raise our blood pressure, help us invent new ways to flip tables, but most of all they have the ability to bring us together. Aww. This is a phenomenon that the creators of the new Call of Duty entry WWII seem to be well aware of and made the center of their new trailer "“Reassemble!” which launched on October 15. In it, we see a tropey but self-aware story using the plotline of the gang getting back together for one more hit, but this time it's for the return of the game. "Haven't you heard? Call of Duty is going back to World War II baby," the inciting member says to a squad member, "we gotta get the guys back together," he replies. The ensuing scenes include the gathering of the squad through various settings. It's endearing and seems to be translating well for fans, at least so far. As of publishing this article, the like/dislike ratio sits at 17,000 likes to 1,000 dislikes. Significantly better than Call of Duty trailers have faired in the past. The Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Reveal Trailer currently has a bitter ratio of 581,000 likes to 3 million dislikes. Ouch. The WWII launch trailer is at 1 million likes to 97,000 dislikes, by the way, possibly showing tempered expectations. Call of Duty: World War II launches November 3 to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. How do you feel about Call of Duty returning to WWII? Are your hopes high for the latest installment? Let us know in the comments below. View full article
  8. First Person Shooters have a certain ability. They can raise our blood pressure, help us invent new ways to flip tables, but most of all they have the ability to bring us together. Aww. This is a phenomenon that the creators of the new Call of Duty entry WWII seem to be well aware of and made the center of their new trailer "“Reassemble!” which launched on October 15. In it, we see a tropey but self-aware story using the plotline of the gang getting back together for one more hit, but this time it's for the return of the game. "Haven't you heard? Call of Duty is going back to World War II baby," the inciting member says to a squad member, "we gotta get the guys back together," he replies. The ensuing scenes include the gathering of the squad through various settings. It's endearing and seems to be translating well for fans, at least so far. As of publishing this article, the like/dislike ratio sits at 17,000 likes to 1,000 dislikes. Significantly better than Call of Duty trailers have faired in the past. The Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare Reveal Trailer currently has a bitter ratio of 581,000 likes to 3 million dislikes. Ouch. The WWII launch trailer is at 1 million likes to 97,000 dislikes, by the way, possibly showing tempered expectations. Call of Duty: World War II launches November 3 to PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC. How do you feel about Call of Duty returning to WWII? Are your hopes high for the latest installment? Let us know in the comments below.
  9. Gaming News:IGN Acquires Humble Bundle

    @herobyclicking added! Thanks for the catch, I thought I added that detail but I just linked it
  10. On October 13 it was announced that "pay what you want" platform Humble Bundle was acquired by media company IGN. Full details of the transaction have not been formally released, but the news has been confirmed by both parties. Humble Bundle elaborated on the acquisition in a blog post titled "Humble Bundle is Joining Forces with IGN!" Within the post, Co-Founder and CEO of the company Jeffrey Rosen stays relatively vague but offers insight into why they chose IGN and what resources they have gained. "We chose IGN because they really understand our vision, share our passion for games, and believe in our mission to promote awesome digital content while helping charity. I can’t think of a better partner than IGN to help Humble Bundle continue our quest," said Rosen. It seems as though Humble Bundle's outward motivation was gaining a support network that a huge company like IGN would definitely possess. "We will continue to bring you all of our humble products, but with more resources and help from IGN," said Rosen. Along that note, the company seems like it will still maintain its separate identity with the CEO saying, "we will keep our own office, culture, and amazing team with IGN helping us further our plans. We will raise even more money for charity." The way that Humble Bundle works, gamers are able to get games for a lower price but are incentivized to pay more than the base price with some of those dollars going to charity. Since their founding, HB states that they have been able to donate about $106 million. Some of the charities that they have supported include GamesAid, Make a Wish, American Red Cross, Save the Children, War Child, Worldreader, WWF, Zidisha and of course Extra Life . Their current charity is SpecialEffect. Since the sale of games is involved, there easily could be an ethical line crossed by IGN in their game coverage. Polygon was able to get this statement from Executive Vice President and General Manager at IGN Mitch Galbraith, "editorial integrity is something we take very seriously at IGN, and I am confident that we will strike the right balance when it comes to our coverage of Humble Bundle and the games they sell. Our readers and customers have always come first — and that won’t change." Have you ever used Humble Bundle? What do you think of a media company acquiring a company that sells games? Let us know in the comments below. View full article
  11. IGN Acquires Humble Bundle

    On October 13 it was announced that "pay what you want" platform Humble Bundle was acquired by media company IGN. Full details of the transaction have not been formally released, but the news has been confirmed by both parties. Humble Bundle elaborated on the acquisition in a blog post titled "Humble Bundle is Joining Forces with IGN!" Within the post, Co-Founder and CEO of the company Jeffrey Rosen stays relatively vague but offers insight into why they chose IGN and what resources they have gained. "We chose IGN because they really understand our vision, share our passion for games, and believe in our mission to promote awesome digital content while helping charity. I can’t think of a better partner than IGN to help Humble Bundle continue our quest," said Rosen. It seems as though Humble Bundle's outward motivation was gaining a support network that a huge company like IGN would definitely possess. "We will continue to bring you all of our humble products, but with more resources and help from IGN," said Rosen. Along that note, the company seems like it will still maintain its separate identity with the CEO saying, "we will keep our own office, culture, and amazing team with IGN helping us further our plans. We will raise even more money for charity." The way that Humble Bundle works, gamers are able to get games for a lower price but are incentivized to pay more than the base price with some of those dollars going to charity. Since their founding, HB states that they have been able to donate about $106 million. Some of the charities that they have supported include GamesAid, Make a Wish, American Red Cross, Save the Children, War Child, Worldreader, WWF, Zidisha and of course Extra Life . Their current charity is SpecialEffect. Since the sale of games is involved, there easily could be an ethical line crossed by IGN in their game coverage. Polygon was able to get this statement from Executive Vice President and General Manager at IGN Mitch Galbraith, "editorial integrity is something we take very seriously at IGN, and I am confident that we will strike the right balance when it comes to our coverage of Humble Bundle and the games they sell. Our readers and customers have always come first — and that won’t change." Have you ever used Humble Bundle? What do you think of a media company acquiring a company that sells games? Let us know in the comments below.
  12. After a couple of delays, it seems like it's finally safe to be excited for the release of South Park: The Fractured But Whole. And last night's latest entry into the core TV series season 21, episode 4 "Franchise Prequel " all but solidified the fact that yes, the new South Park game is indeed coming out in less than a week. The new episode aired October 11 and starts out with a superhero audition and evolves into commentary about Facebook. Innocent enough right? We've had episodes with the gang running around in superhero garb before, but there was more than just a subtle nod to the upcoming game at the end of the episode. In the final scene, there was a dialogue that will seem familiar to anyone who saw the E3 2016 trailer since its almost the exactly same (save a few edits). We see the group splitting up into two "franchises" creating the conflict for the game. With all of this in mind, Matt and Trey are probably giving us a hint to who at least one of the in-game villains will be, Mark Zuckerberg. Some background, in the episode some alarming pictures show up on Facebook of the Coon and Friends, thanks to Professor Chaos' ingenious and devious plan to slander them via the web. The parents of the SP universe, as competent as ever invite Mark Zuckerberg to the tiny mountain town to resolve things. Zuckerberg proves to be more trouble than he's worth (and has a weird dubbed voice?) and refuses to be "blocked" out of town. And if you needed any more evidence that the episode and game are indeed tied together, South Park tweeted this out in anticipation of the airing. The game officially releases on Tuesday, October 17. It follows its 2014 predecessor South Park: The Stick of Truth. Both games feature RPG gameplay closely resembling the style of the show. Will you be playing The Fractured But Whole? How do you think gameplay will differ from The Stick of Truth? View full article
  13. After a couple of delays, it seems like it's finally safe to be excited for the release of South Park: The Fractured But Whole. And last night's latest entry into the core TV series season 21, episode 4 "Franchise Prequel " all but solidified the fact that yes, the new South Park game is indeed coming out in less than a week. The new episode aired October 11 and starts out with a superhero audition and evolves into commentary about Facebook. Innocent enough right? We've had episodes with the gang running around in superhero garb before, but there was more than just a subtle nod to the upcoming game at the end of the episode. In the final scene, there was a dialogue that will seem familiar to anyone who saw the E3 2016 trailer since its almost the exactly same (save a few edits). We see the group splitting up into two "franchises" creating the conflict for the game. With all of this in mind, Matt and Trey are probably giving us a hint to who at least one of the in-game villains will be, Mark Zuckerberg. Some background, in the episode some alarming pictures show up on Facebook of the Coon and Friends, thanks to Professor Chaos' ingenious and devious plan to slander them via the web. The parents of the SP universe, as competent as ever invite Mark Zuckerberg to the tiny mountain town to resolve things. Zuckerberg proves to be more trouble than he's worth (and has a weird dubbed voice?) and refuses to be "blocked" out of town. And if you needed any more evidence that the episode and game are indeed tied together, South Park tweeted this out in anticipation of the airing. The game officially releases on Tuesday, October 17. It follows its 2014 predecessor South Park: The Stick of Truth. Both games feature RPG gameplay closely resembling the style of the show. Will you be playing The Fractured But Whole? How do you think gameplay will differ from The Stick of Truth?
  14. Review: Lock's Quest

    That last wave of Clockwork horrors has left me exhausted with my defeat looming imminent. The enemy infiltrated my barriers, and have begun their final push toward their objective. The stronghold will be destroyed within seconds once they break through, but I’ve got the next round planned. I’ve assessed my strategy and know how to hold the oncoming Clockwork army back until I can regroup. This round my plan will surely... wait, no! How did they get through there that fast? Wait! Lock’s Quest immerses players in tower defense gameplay with RPG elements sprinkled in. The game first hit the scene in 2008 when THQ released it on the Nintendo DS. At release, it enjoyed a bit of a cult status with mixed reviews from critics. On May 30, 2017, the remaster released on consoles with updated music, controls, and graphics, as well as the addition of extra content. The new graphics slap a new coat of paint on Lock's Quest that looks like an isometric mash-up of Pokémon and Stardew Valley. While music and UI got the remaster treatment, combat saw expansion. A new progression system, strategy elements, map, endless mode and other features were added to appeal to old fans of the series as well as "sophisticated gamers" according to the new features listed on the game's website. This beefing up affects build and combat gameplay (more on those modes later). The progression system now aligns with the plot, unlocking relevant goodies for build-mode. And the remaster also boasts speedier build/combat cycles so players can assess their strategy if necessary to tackle the next wave more effectively. While I did get frustrated when I failed a stage, I did appreciate the ability to reset and tackle the challenge with new knowledge. However, I did occasionally have issues with crashing when attempting to do so. Speaking of building and combat, 5th Cell structured gameplay around tower defense into two distinct modes: Build Mode and Battle Mode. Players have a time limit on their barricade planning in Build Mode. This barricade protects an objective and must withstand a barrage of enemies within the combat time limit. The tools and resources at your disposal correspond to progress as the enemies get more diverse and stronger. Structure options include walls, turrets, land mines, soldiers, and more. The currency you'll use to construct your barricade comes from defeating enemies and adds a depth to the difficulty. If you're not doing well in your planning it will carry over to the next level. During the battle phase you have control of Lock, and depending on your progress, he has different abilities. At the very beginning of the game though he has a vital skill called ratcheting where he repairs the damage done to structures. His other abilities range from attacks and energy drains to more advanced repair and money drops. The enemy, the Clockwork focus on attacking your infrastructure during this stage. Guiding Lock will help you save your defenses for future rounds and help earn some currency. The foundation for the civilization of the Kingdom where Lock's Quest takes place surrounds the discovery of an element called Source, aka that currency we were talking about earlier. Source doesn't really have an explanation, but people who have been dubbed Archineers found a way to manipulate it. The magical stuff powers defense items, like what Lock builds and uses. Conflict came when one Archineer found that Source could replicate life and utilized this ability. The king banished this Archineer. This Archineer then became Lord Agony and created the Clockwork, "living" machines, in retaliation. Lord Agony disappeared seemingly defeated, but the details of the battle remain unclear to the world's inhabitants. This all happened before the events of the game. One thing is clear, however, the Clockwork have returned. Players participate in the current, battle-ridden world as the titular Lock, a young hero with an unclear past but a determination to pave his future. Lock lives with his sister Emi and grandfather Tobias. One day while making repairs to structures on the shore Lock and Emi come across a wounded Archineer who fled from a battle against the Clockwork. The wounded Archineer enlists Lock to help fend off an upcoming attack. In the chaos of the attack, Emi is lost, the town falls under the attack and Lock gets determined to defeat the Clockwork. What I could really get behind in terms of the story was the fact that it explained the gameplay. Lock's Quest's use of story makes it unique. Rather than arbitrarily running alongside the gameplay, the story seeks to explain the presence of the RTS gameplay. Lock has Archineer abilities and can manipulate source making him able to build turrets. This makes sense with this context. Rather than expecting players to just accept the mechanics of the game, the devs did a good job of weaving it into the story. Not a small feat for a tower defense. While Lock's Quest's strength shines in its storytelling, its weaknesses lie in combat. Isometric view is standard in games like this, but I found myself fighting with it during the battle sequences. Moving Lock around was painful. The slow movement became especially noticeable while fighting under the constraints of a time limit on a battlefield swarmed with enemies. I also had some issues with crashing and having to restart. I wasn't a happy gamer when I discovered that the cutscenes were unskippable. Conclusion: While frustrating at times, Lock's Quest provides engaging mechanics that makes you want to progress. I found it a little addicting to see how the enemy would interact with my builds, and the degree to which they would be successful. And like a good little gamer I was driven by the need to unlock new gear to fortify. Crashes and trouble finding Lock during a stressful attack sequence definitely detracted from my initial experiences, but overall this title had me pushing my left brain during combat and engaged my right with the world it managed to create. Lock's Quest was reviewed on Xbox One and is also available on PC, PlayStation 4, and Nintendo DS.
  15. Feature: Review: Lock's Quest

    That last wave of Clockwork horrors has left me exhausted with my defeat looming imminent. The enemy infiltrated my barriers, and have begun their final push toward their objective. The stronghold will be destroyed within seconds once they break through, but I’ve got the next round planned. I’ve assessed my strategy and know how to hold the oncoming Clockwork army back until I can regroup. This round my plan will surely... wait, no! How did they get through there that fast? Wait! Lock’s Quest immerses players in tower defense gameplay with RPG elements sprinkled in. The game first hit the scene in 2008 when THQ released it on the Nintendo DS. At release, it enjoyed a bit of a cult status with mixed reviews from critics. On May 30, 2017, the remaster released on consoles with updated music, controls, and graphics, as well as the addition of extra content. The new graphics slap a new coat of paint on Lock's Quest that looks like an isometric mash-up of Pokémon and Stardew Valley. While music and UI got the remaster treatment, combat saw expansion. A new progression system, strategy elements, map, endless mode and other features were added to appeal to old fans of the series as well as "sophisticated gamers" according to the new features listed on the game's website. This beefing up affects build and combat gameplay (more on those modes later). The progression system now aligns with the plot, unlocking relevant goodies for build-mode. And the remaster also boasts speedier build/combat cycles so players can assess their strategy if necessary to tackle the next wave more effectively. While I did get frustrated when I failed a stage, I did appreciate the ability to reset and tackle the challenge with new knowledge. However, I did occasionally have issues with crashing when attempting to do so. Speaking of building and combat, 5th Cell structured gameplay around tower defense into two distinct modes: Build Mode and Battle Mode. Players have a time limit on their barricade planning in Build Mode. This barricade protects an objective and must withstand a barrage of enemies within the combat time limit. The tools and resources at your disposal correspond to progress as the enemies get more diverse and stronger. Structure options include walls, turrets, land mines, soldiers, and more. The currency you'll use to construct your barricade comes from defeating enemies and adds a depth to the difficulty. If you're not doing well in your planning it will carry over to the next level. During the battle phase you have control of Lock, and depending on your progress, he has different abilities. At the very beginning of the game though he has a vital skill called ratcheting where he repairs the damage done to structures. His other abilities range from attacks and energy drains to more advanced repair and money drops. The enemy, the Clockwork focus on attacking your infrastructure during this stage. Guiding Lock will help you save your defenses for future rounds and help earn some currency. The foundation for the civilization of the Kingdom where Lock's Quest takes place surrounds the discovery of an element called Source, aka that currency we were talking about earlier. Source doesn't really have an explanation, but people who have been dubbed Archineers found a way to manipulate it. The magical stuff powers defense items, like what Lock builds and uses. Conflict came when one Archineer found that Source could replicate life and utilized this ability. The king banished this Archineer. This Archineer then became Lord Agony and created the Clockwork, "living" machines, in retaliation. Lord Agony disappeared seemingly defeated, but the details of the battle remain unclear to the world's inhabitants. This all happened before the events of the game. One thing is clear, however, the Clockwork have returned. Players participate in the current, battle-ridden world as the titular Lock, a young hero with an unclear past but a determination to pave his future. Lock lives with his sister Emi and grandfather Tobias. One day while making repairs to structures on the shore Lock and Emi come across a wounded Archineer who fled from a battle against the Clockwork. The wounded Archineer enlists Lock to help fend off an upcoming attack. In the chaos of the attack, Emi is lost, the town falls under the attack and Lock gets determined to defeat the Clockwork. What I could really get behind in terms of the story was the fact that it explained the gameplay. Lock's Quest's use of story makes it unique. Rather than arbitrarily running alongside the gameplay, the story seeks to explain the presence of the RTS gameplay. Lock has Archineer abilities and can manipulate source making him able to build turrets. This makes sense with this context. Rather than expecting players to just accept the mechanics of the game, the devs did a good job of weaving it into the story. Not a small feat for a tower defense. While Lock's Quest's strength shines in its storytelling, its weaknesses lie in combat. Isometric view is standard in games like this, but I found myself fighting with it during the battle sequences. Moving Lock around was painful. The slow movement became especially noticeable while fighting under the constraints of a time limit on a battlefield swarmed with enemies. I also had some issues with crashing and having to restart. I wasn't a happy gamer when I discovered that the cutscenes were unskippable. Conclusion: While frustrating at times, Lock's Quest provides engaging mechanics that makes you want to progress. I found it a little addicting to see how the enemy would interact with my builds, and the degree to which they would be successful. And like a good little gamer I was driven by the need to unlock new gear to fortify. Crashes and trouble finding Lock during a stressful attack sequence definitely detracted from my initial experiences, but overall this title had me pushing my left brain during combat and engaged my right with the world it managed to create. Lock's Quest was reviewed on Xbox One and is also available on PC, PlayStation 4, and Nintendo DS. View full article